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N680SLI-DQ6 and Corsair Twin2x2048 8500C5D UNSTABLE


exodragon

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Currently im setup with the Gigabyte N680SLI-DQ6 mobo and the 8500C5D ram. I was wondering if anyone had some stable settings i might try out. Nothing is working and i keep getting the blue screen of death so please help me out and be specific on the settings thanks.....

 

p.s. This ram does not like my Striker extreme at all.........

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Please make sure that you have the latest Bios version and then load setup/optimized defaults and set the Dim Voltage to 2.2 volts and then set SLI Ready Memory to CPU 0% and set the CPC/CR to 2T, then test with http://www.memtest.org! If you still get errors, please follow the link in my signature “I think I have a bad part!” and we will be happy to replace them or it! However, if you get errors with both modules that would suggest some other problem and I would test them one up and or in another system or MB to be sure. In addition, with some MB's (Mostly ASUS) you have to disable legacy USB in the bios when running any memory test.
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  • 1 month later...
Although my problem is not the same I would think the two have common issues. First of all I buy this board with the understanding that it supports 1066mhz memory then I find out after I purchase the RAM that the voltage for my Corsair Dominator ram is not supported, so then I have to play the voltage tweaking game for over a week. The first memory kit I got was two 1GB sticks, well all things fine after I finally got my bios settings figured out. Well today I added an additional two sticks of the same for a total of 4GB in all 4 slots, well POST sees 4GB's but windows doesn't--it tells me I have 2.75GB RAM installed. When I checked NTune, it showed the same ram stick in all 4 slots so the RAM's there. It sure would be nice having Windows XP see it as well? Any ideas?
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Your computer has many methods in which to use memory. There are memory storage and caches all over the motherboard. These devices contain some of the below method of storage:

 

* RAM

* ROM

* Cache

* Dynamic RAM

* Static RAM

* Flash memory

* Virtual memory

* Video memory

* BIOS

 

 

For example, your sound, video, keyboard, chipset caches, I/O controller (IDE, SATA, etc) caches . . . Now these device with discrete and cache RAM need to have their "Addresses" so that the computer knows where they are in order to query and access them.

 

You computer also has System Resource Memory. Consider this as an index of addresses that tell the computer where everything is for access as mentioned above. The computer needs to know that a certain boundary of addresses will contain certain functions to perform when commanded.

 

Memory-mapped devices (such as your video card) will use some of that physical address space, as will the BIOS ROMs. After all the non-memory devices have had their say, there will be less than 4GB of address space available for RAM below the 4GB physical address boundary. Now a 32bit Operating system such as Windows XP 32bit and VISTA 32bit have the ability to access 2^32 bits = 4GB. Now if you have an 8800GTX with 768MB of DRAM, then that memory must be addressed in the space of the 4GB and you lose some of the system dram to the addressing. This continues with all other devices, leaving you with less than the 4GB. Since Windows can address up to 4GB, then with 3GB, there will be the 3 --> 4GB mapping so you should not lose that DRAM with 3GB unless your devices demand it. For example, SLi with 2 X 8800GTX 768MB will certainly take away from the 3GB.

 

No problem. Keep in mind that you have 1.5GB of Video card memory. Add that to the OS's needs which is usually 376MB or so on a clean system with your components. Then there needs to be address space for the Virtual Swap File and you are stuck at the 4GB plateau.

 

If you had a 2 GB system, then the addressing is done in the discrete video card DRAM.

 

In your system, the Video card ROM is accessed by the CPU and 1.5GB of DRAM is seen. There is no addressable space since you are at the 4GB plateau level. Thus the CPU reserves 1.5GB of that 4GB. In a 64bit OS, the 4GB is like the 2GB is in a 32bit OS and the CPU just addresses the Video cards discrete DRAM above the 4GB level. On a 64bit OS with 8GB, the Video cards discrete DRAM is addressed above the 8GB

 

Hope this helps to clarify things a bit.

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I think I get the gist of what you're saying but I still don't know if there's anything I need to do or should do? Should I go to a 64bit system or should I be content with how the OS is currently addressing memory?

 

Thanks,

Guy

 

At this point in time, I would just wait until VISTA SP1 is released. Then the move to VISTA 64 will be far smoother. If not, then I would advise you to create an image of your current OS or install another drive to test the VISTA 64Bit OS. You do not want to format a working system and end up with a less than robust install.

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My BIOS settings are TCL - 5, TRCD - 5, TRP - 5, TRAS - 15, TRC - 22 and the Command Per Clock - 2. The Memory Clock Mode - Unlinked, Memory MHz 1066, The Memory voltage is +0.4. I just recently purchased 2 additional 8500C5D chips and now my system is giving me problems. When I restart the system shuts down and will not restart until after 5 minutes or so. I've spoken to Gigabyte and they think it my be the chip set on the motherboard. This might require a BIOS update from Gigabyte they are going to investigate. I also spoke in length with Corsair support and they came to the conclusion that it must be the motherboard. Yes I've testing the system with a different PSU and Video card - still the same results. A word of caution to anyone thinking of adding additional chips to your system. Corsair doesn't recommend or guarantee that the 8500C5D go into a system unless you purchase a QUAD package. I was told that the fine print on the package suggests just that. Which is disappointing for me - I purchased and additional set to only find out later that I'm required to remove the 2 and find a supported QUAD set. The recommended QUAD set is Twin2X4096-6400C5DHX which is not even close to the 8500C5D's. So the conclusion is that I'm to wait for Gigabyte to provide a BIOS update and maybe it will fix the problem. I don't understand why Corsair would not have tested / certified their chips in all the memory slots on any particular motherboard - it doesn't make sense. Before purchasing the mem chips I went to the Corsair Website and did the memory configurator and went with Corsairs suggested chips. Did I mention that the chips have been RMA'd 3 times now? I will mention that Corsair has been very helpful and customer support very nice. Just don't understand the certification process.....
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Forgot to mention that the Motherboard has also been RMA'd 3 times. Always with the same results. Only later did I discover that it was the additional memory chips. The system works fine with 2 chips - 4 chips is when the system fails. I can purchase different chips or live with the issue. At least now I know what the issue is...
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