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TWIN2X1024A-6400, stability and reg for counter strike source


Soleft

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This is my memory

http://www.corsair.com/_datasheets/TWIN2X1024A-6400.pdf

 

I think I'm trying to achieve stability>performance.

 

I have uploaded my dxdiag, so you can see the system I am running.

 

Here is an extract from an article to get "reg" on a game called Counter strike source.

 

"Set memory voltage to 2.8 in bios default is 2.6 this makes system a lot more stable you can also lower ram timings i use 6-3-3-2 with my 1GB of corsair pro memory this varies on all memory try to find out ur memorys timings - lower timings seem to make recoil alot better"

 

800MHz at at 5-5-5-15 is the spec that the corsair data sheets give me. Could you recommend me another according to the article?

 

Thank you for your time

 

Soleft

DxDiag.txt

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That article was written for DDR memory, so it's not really relevant for you, I wouldn't adjust RAM timings unless you're having serious problems with some game... or you really feel like it ;):

 

In any case it'll probably help video quality in games a lot more if you overclock your graphics card. From your specs, I doubt you'd be having any issue with CS:Source at maxed settings.

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I wish that was the case, if my frames drop below 70 I can feel it. My FPS is another issue I will overcome by overclocking the CPU and graphics card. I think the reg issue is related to memory.

 

When I have my machine turned on for a long time, and I then play css my reg is awful. I can out right be shooting someone in the face and it will not register. I then restart my machine and everything is fine. I think it has something to do with memory.

 

I play for money, this is why I'm very anal about my system :P

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I see.

 

Mem settings depend, to a large extent, on whether you're willing to fry your RAM and how quickly you're willing to sacrifice it. Hardcore enthusiasts routinely run their RAM at 2.4+ V, which in most cases kills it off in a couple of months or less.

 

For a start, I'd say you could try 4-4-4-12-2T timings at the same speed you're at now. You may have to push the voltage up to around 2 or 2.1V to get it stable. If you can get that stable and if you think it makes a difference, you can try lowering latencies further or maybe raising frequency a little bit.

 

If you use something around 2.2V and maybe fiddle with northbridge voltages a little, you might get it stable at a 1T command rate around 800 MHz at CL4, which should make a significant difference to memory bandwidth.

 

I haven't worked with this exact model of RAM though, so take anything I say with a pinch of salt! :p:

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Well I'd like to use this computer for a 1-3 years still...

 

"If you use something around 2.2V and maybe fiddle with northbridge voltages a little, you might get it stable at a 1T command rate around 800 MHz at CL4, which should make a significant difference to memory bandwidth."

 

Okay you lost me there lol, I'll educate myself a little more so I can comprehend what your're saying.

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Lol, sorry about that. :p:

 

1T refers to the command rate for RAM, the only two options you have are 2T (1 command every 2 clock cycles) and 1T (1 command every clock cycle).

Maintaining a 1T command rate at high freq settings gets really really hard, but the performance benefits are pretty big.

 

Your northbridge could be referred to by different terms. If you have a motherboard based on a 680i chipset, it's called an SPP, if you have an AMD board, you don't have a northbridge, it's inside your CPU.

 

CL4 refers to a CAS latency of 4, where CAS is column address strobe, the first and most important in the set of four numbers that detail RAM timings. (E.g. 4-4-4-12, the first '4' is CAS). This is the number of clock cycles your RAM waits before moving on to the next memory block in a certain "row" of memory blocks. There's actually a wikipedia article that does a decent job at explaining these;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SDRAM_latency

 

Lemme know if I should clear something else up. :o:

 

Edit: Cleaned up some grammar...

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