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DELL dimension 1100 --- Corsair CMX1024-3200 2gb (1gbx2)??


ace1623

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Ok, so i used the corsair memory configurator upgrade thing. Put all the information in, and it says that the motherboard with this computer is a DDR400 (pc3200) motherboard, but in the ram upgrade it didnt give me the option to use CMX1024-3200 .... is this because its not compatable, or because this ram is "too good" for a system like this haha.

 

A little background. This is my buddy's comp and i had some of this ram sitting around. Just want to make sure if i sell it to him cheap he will be able to use it.

 

Thanks,

 

Arlis

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NO!

 

Dells are PICKY AS HELL when it comes to memory, as are most OEMs. They also don't let you change timings / voltage, which most Enthusiast memory requires.

 

That's why Corsair has their System Select line of memory, which meets OEM specs and doesn't need to be tweaked.

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Wired is 100% correct but I would add 1 thing here. You can always install the memory and see if it will work. I have had cases with most any OEM you can name where XMS memory will run in some models and not in others. It is NOT recommended due to the potential compatibility issues of course but you could always try it.
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As long as you properly physically install it correctly, you should not damage anything. If I had to guess, it is very likely that the computer is not going to boot with 4 DIMMs mixing XMS and OEM. If it does, test it for stability and go from there. I'd run http://www.memtest.org on it before trying to boot to Windows. If it is not stable with Memtest, DO NOT boot to the OS as it is possible to corrupt Windows if you have a significant memory instability.
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no i would not be filling all 4 dimms, i would actually replace the memory with the xms. I will give it a shot sometime in the next couple days, unless someone has a strong agrument on why i should waste my time

 

Ah sorry, I forgot it was the 2 x 1gb kit. That improves the chances somewhat IMO.

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To be honest, which CPU is that Dimension 1100 equipped with?

 

If it's a Celeron or a 2.4A or 2.8A P4, you have little choice but to use DDR333 (PC2700) memory. (The memory speed is supposed to downclock to DDR333 speed with a CPU that uses an effective FSB speed of 533MHz - but in practice, that downclocking only works properly with the originally installed OEM modules or a memory upgrade ordered directly from Dell for its own systems, while many third-party PC3200 memory modules, including Corsair's, get treated by the Dell BIOS as a straight DDR400 module that's "permanently locked" at DDR400 speed.) This is to comply with Intel's official specs for its DDR1 chipsets, which limit asynchronous memory operation to +/- 33.3MHz from the FSB speed (based on the actual, not effective, clockspeeds of both the memory and the FSB). In this case, the 533FSB is actually a quad-pumped 133MHz FSB, while DDR400 memory runs at an actual 200MHz - a difference of 67MHz, which is out of spec (according to Intel). Furthermore, most Dimension 1100's made came with such lower-end CPU's which cannot take full advantage of the system motherboard's maximum memory speed capabilities.

 

Thus, if you try the XMS modules on the Dimension 1100, but the system ends up failing to even POST at all, chances are that you have a mismatch between the CPU and memory - or more specifically, you have memory modules which are treated as being "permanently locked" at DDR400 speed when the system expects a memory speed of DDR333 or DDR266.

 

By the way, it's true that the Dimension 1100's motherboard is a DDR400 (PC3200) motherboard. But due to the limitations of Intel's DDR1 memory controllers and chipsets, you can use DDR400 (PC3200) memory only if your CPU runs on an effective FSB speed of 800MHz (there has never been an Intel CPU which uses an effective FSB speed of 667MHz). In other words, you've run into the realities of the low-end Intel-based market, where most such systems run on an effective CPU FSB speed that's much less than 800MHz.

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Wow, thats a lot of good information. The chip is a celeron, so the issue is there. Is it possible to just change the speed of the memory in the bios?

 

No, not on a Dell. "IF" and only "IF" the Dell bios has the ability to "automagically" interpret that SPD on the XMS memory and find a suitable CPU/DRAM ratio, it's probably not going to work. But, as I said initially, just plug it in and see what happens.

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So if i put this in the computer, and windows xp says there are 2gb there then i am ok? Is there any potential to cause damage to anything?

 

Even if it does work, the system may suffer from stability issues. This is because OEM system motherboards run at a voltage that's fixed at or slightly below the JEDEC reference for the memory type - but the XMS series modules often require a higher-than-reference VDIMM setting in order to work reliably.

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