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Little worried after reading here about new rig


diableri

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I just ordered the parts for my new computer and like a fool... I didn't read here first. I only checked for compatibility for RAM->MBoard->CPU etc.

 

After reading through the boards, can you guys give me some feedback as to whether or not I should try to cancel my order and look for a different solution?

 

My specs are in the little tool up near my user name but here it is just in case:

 

P5N32-E SLI (new)

e6600 Core 2 Duo (new)

TWIN2X2048-6400C4 (new)

eVGA 7800GTX (old)

Thermaltake Toughpower 650W PSU (new)

WD 120 gig SATA HD

WD 300 gig SATA HD

TDK CDR IDE

 

I plan on using the sound chip on the board and the NIC on the board.

 

I am just recovering from a bad experience with a Gigabyte AMD board/XMS Extreme RAM with some instability problems and I absolutely do NOT want to deal with that this time. I had hoped buying respectable memory and a higher end respected board would help be avoid that but there's already some posts about problems with similar combos...

 

Any advice guys? Thank you very much for any feedback you can provide.

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Unless you wish to go with SLi and do not care about a minimal overclocking then I advise you to move away from that board. I would move to either the Gigabyte 965p-DS3, Gigabyte 965p-DQ6 or the ASUS P5B-E Deluxe boards if you want a good overclock. All these boards have High Definition (HD) 8 channel audio and I personally find them more than adequate.

 

I have built many systems with these boards. They overclock well and are extremely stable. All have been built with Corsair DRAM, from the Value up to the 6400C4's with absolutely no issue.

 

I have personally found that Intel makes the best and most stable chipsets for their processors. Nvidia makes some decent boards on the Intel platform but they lack in stability and are not as good overclockers. The Nvidia Nforce 590 (880i) could well be the exception to this rule but it still lacks maturity in my opinion.

 

If you are not going to overclock, then it really doesn't matter. The Nvidia based board you have picked has shown to have problems at more than minimal overclocks.

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My recent experiences with Gigabyte have pretty much assured that I will never use one of their boards again.

 

My plan for this set up is to tide me over as a gaming machine for another 3-6 months. At that point I'll buy an 8800 level vid card(depending on what's out at the time), 1k-1100 W PSU (in prep for buying a 2nd video card within a year of that time) and one of the faster CPUs out at the time. All the replaced parts will retire into my 2nd machine as upgrades for it.

 

I have no plans to OC and never have. I've never had any reason to since I've been lucky enough to be able to stay relatively current with hardware. I do tend to play the newest games at 1600x1200 and it ticks me off to not be able to run them turned all the way up. That's why I've generally gone overboard on my game systems. It's my hobby and what I blow discretionary income on.

 

Since I don't plan to OC all I really want out of the systems is stability. It'll be cooled as much as it needs to stay within specs etc. I just don't want random reboots and crap like I've been fighting for the last year with my last rig.

 

Thanks for the input! I used to be far far more knowledgeable about all this stuff but my work has pushed my spare research time into software instead of hardware.

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