Jump to content
Corsair Community

Is Voyager Windows Readyboost Compatable?


malstar

Recommended Posts

Hi i'm trying to get my Corsair Voyager 2GB to work with the new ReadyBoost feature on Windows Vista - where it can use flash memory to boost system performance. I get an error message that says it does not meet the performance requirements?

 

Can anybody help?

 

Neil.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did you plug it into a USB 2.0 port?

 

ReadyBoost - Using Your USB Key to Speed Up Windows Vista

 

ReadyBoost FAQ

 

I'll email Ram Guy and Jack Flash w/ this info and see if they have done any testing on this. However, I seriously doubt they'll give it an official stamp of approval until Vista's gone gold, or at the least Microsoft has said that the ReadyBoost code is gold.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

Yeah I inserted it into a USB 2.0. Apparently microsoft measures random read and writes to the USB Falsh drive rather than the usual sequential. They state that some flash drives have great sequential rates but really poor random ones. I'm hoping this isn't the case with the Voyager!

 

Neil.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

OK, I managed to install Vista Beta 2 on my computer and like others, Vista said that my Flash Voyager USB key did not meet the performance requirements for Readyboost. Has anyone had sucsess with one yet?

 

I ran Sysoft Sandra to benchmark my Voyager flash drive and posted the results here: http://www.houseofhelp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=51518&page=2

 

I'm wondering if maybe there might be a correlation between the sequential read results reported there by Sandra and the random read results Vista supposedly tests. If so, then the reporting discrepency I identified in the other thread might be related to the cause of Vista's rejecting the device as Readyboost capable. Could it be a firmware problem with the USB key? I tried benchmarking with HDTach as well, but unfortunately that program does not benchmark random access file transfer bandwidth either and I have yet to find any programs that do...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ReadyBOOST is looking for a specifiic read/write performance at a 4K block size. The current Flash Voyager will not meet this spec. There is nothing you will be able to do to get your current Flash Voayger to meet this spec.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or to put it another way...

 

You are out of luck, dude. And as you've probably also learnt by now, write speeds under Vista when the drive is FAT formatted are 5-10x slower than they are under XP.

 

I read the performance needed for ReadyBoost is 2.5MB/sec throughput for 4K random reads and 1.75MB/sec throughput for 512[byte] random writes. Its the write performance of the Voyager that nails you, though be it 512B or 4k.

 

On the bright side, not just the Voyager but a lot (most?) flash memory won't work either.

 

As has been discussed elsewhere in the forum, it seems like a random access time of 1 millisecond or thereabouts is whats needed. Only a few on the market today will meet the readyboost specification.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its the write performance of the Voyager that nails you, though be it 512B or 4k.

How do you know, have you found a program that benchmarks random data transfer bandwidth?

 

On the bright side, not just the Voyager but a lot (most?) flash memory won't work either.

That's the bright side?!? LOL!

In that case, I find your lack of respect for the dark side most.... disturbing ;)

 

OH, BTW, I've learned that some ppl have had luck with Memorex, and I found one called Zion that looked promising from it's specs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most thumb drives out weren't designed to do what M$ wants, but they're all making new versions that will. Most are probably waiting for M$ to state that the ReadyBoost code is finalized to do their final testing.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed, so its hard to recommend going out and buying a USB flash drive right now on the slim chance it will work. Cute how MS didnt mention this. "Oh, btw, to use Readyboost you'll all have to go and buy new drives... <chuckle> which, um, are not even available yet." I for one got burnt. I dont regret getting my Voyager, but still its little disappointing.

 

Best to wait until the dust settles and it manufacturers start specifying compatibility.

 

"How do you know, have you found a program that benchmarks random data transfer bandwidth?"

 

No. Or yes but only indirectly. The write speeds under Vista when FAT formatted seem to top out at about 0.8 MB/s. That's about what the Voyager benchmarks for 4k file sizes under XP. So, I infer that Vista automatically transfers files to the USB drive in (random) 4k blocks even if the actual file size is much larger.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The write speeds under Vista when FAT formatted seem to top out at about 0.8 MB/s. That's about what the Voyager benchmarks for 4k file sizes under XP. So, I infer that Vista automatically transfers files to the USB drive in (random) 4k blocks even if the actual file size is much larger.

Sandra benchmarks sequential mode transfers, and the Sandra large file write benchmark (FAT32) seems to correlate fairly well with the real world file copy performance (FAT32 for XP and NTFS for Vista being equal). FAT32 for Vista is another story (anomylous but still about 1MB/sec). Flash drives are supposedly much better than HD's at small file random transfers; this is why Readyboost was developed (and tested on several flash devices -- wish I knew which ones). See this page for more info: http://blogs.msdn.com/tomarcher/archive/2006/06/02/615199.aspx

 

I concur on the risk of purchase though (personally I don't have $50 burning a hole in my pocket for something I don't know will work). Complicating the matter is a problem with flash disk controller variation within single models among some flash disk manufacturers. Controller variation means unreliable performance figures for various manufacturer's flash drives. The good news is that Readyboost will eventually enforce minimum standards since drives are going to be certified as being compatible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...