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WanderingWOW

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Nothing's 100% if that's what you're wondering.

 

 

http://www.houseofhelp.com/v2/showthread.php?t=47998

How secure is the passworded partition? Is this a serious security feature, or is it more intended to keep out casual browsers?

 

Can the partition be independently decrypted, meaning can I plug it into a totally unfamiliar computer and have the password prompt pop up?

 

What happens if I turn off the password popup? How do I get into the encrypted partition?

If the software is not installed they will not even know its there. If it is seen it will be unavailable with out the software and password.
I also have some concerns about this security partition...

 

Is it actually encrypted? How so? The way it is set up now, it would definately defeat someone who picked it up on the street after I lose it, but if a technically inclined individual who wanted to get at my info got his hands on it, how secure is secure?

 

Also, is there any way to take the flash voyager utility with you, so that you could execute it off of the unsecured partition to open the secured partition? If not now, are there plans to make that an option? Sure would be handy....

The secure partition is not encrypted. It is just a hidden partition. Any data stored can be recovered with the right equipment. Even 128-bit encrypted files can be decoded by those who know what they are doing given enough time. The utility can be transported on the unsecure partition and installed on any host computer so that you will have access to the secure partition. The utility can not be run from the drive itself. If the software is not installed you will not have access to the secure partition.
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Nothing's 100% if that's what you're wondering.

With proper encryption (and passphrase) it is. Please check the theories behind (proper) encryption. Also if you know of any practical (or even theoretical) attacks on: AES, Blowfish, Twofish, CAST-5, IDEA [etc.] I guess the cryptographic community (and scientists around the globe) are more than interested in hearing your ideas. ;):

 

Even 128-bit encrypted files can be decoded by those who know what they are doing given enough time.

This is pure bs. Noone -- not even the NSA -- can break proper 128-bit encryption (proper meaning there is no shortcut other than trying all 2^128 keys). Just do the math for yourself. Start with an insane amount of cpu's, an insane decryption rate per cpu and see how you still end up at several times the age of the universe.. :bigeyes:

 

@WanderingWOW

If I had found your drive I would be able to read your files almost immediately. If you're interested in encryption you may want to check out GnuPG and Truecrypt. In the future better learn how to discern snake oil from real encryption.

Truecyrpt is very good. I use it to crypt file on my USB drive, and I have personally checked the source code and compiled it myself from same source (a bit paranoid perhaps..).

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With proper encryption (and passphrase) it is. Please check the theories behind (proper) encryption. Also if you know of any practical (or even theoretical) attacks on: AES, Blowfish, Twofish, CAST-5, IDEA [etc.] I guess the cryptographic community (and scientists around the globe) are more than interested in hearing your ideas. ;):
I repeat, NOTHING is 100%. ANY encryption can be cracked given enough time. There's a big difference between impossible and improbable. Yes, I'm looking ahead to bigger, more powerful CPUs, quantum computing, etc, but never say never :) Paranoia is our friend! Just don't give him a gun, he's mean like that.

 

 

Noone -- not even the NSA -- can break proper 128-bit encryption (proper meaning there is no shortcut other than trying all 2^128 keys). Just do the math for yourself. Start with an insane amount of cpu's, an insane decryption rate per cpu and see how you still end up at several times the age of the universe.. :bigeyes:
Brute force, sure, it's damn near impossible. NSA and the like will look at the underlying encryption method for mathematical weaknesses, as well as the ones who encrypted it. The user's usually the weakest link (durrrr... my password is GOD / LOVE / SEX / PASSWORD / any number of derivates of them and/or fav subjects, etc.)

 

 

The real question that the security minded should be asking is: what type of encryption software does Corsair use in their software? Granted since it's only hidden, a decent bit reader (Ok ok, it's usually hex) with bit/byte analysis (e.g. comparison to known file header types) could make quick work of a hidden partition, but hey, who's counting? :) yeah yeah, BAD math joke, I know.

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