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D865PERL Compatibility Question (with thoughts of replacement)


RJLeong65

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Dear RAM GUY,

 

I currently have an Intel D865PERL motherboard with a 2.8C P4 Northwood CPU. From my experience, I've found the now-discontinued XMS3200LL modules to be incompatible with this motherboard due to the motherboard's lack of DDR voltage adjustments. Its replacement - two 512MB XXX PC3200 3-4-4-8 modules - also had errors on one stick. Then I've replaced them with the VS1GBKIT400 modules (which the BIOS version P21 detected by SPD as having CAS 2.5-3-3-8 timings), which worked fine. (I wonder why Corsair's site now lists the VS1GBKIT400 memory as being "rated" at CAS 2.5-3-3-6 timings?)

 

Today I decided to try the XMS TWINX1024-3200C2PT kit. When my system booted up, the SPD was detected as CAS 3-3-3-8 timings (as expected). So I manually adjusted them to 2-3-3-6. It went through three passes on Memtest86 with no errors.

 

So far for Memtest. Now I am considering replacing my motherboard (due to the potential issues that I mentioned above). However, that will also mean replacing the CPU, the video card and the power supply at once, along with the motherboard (since new motherboards for my current processor aren't being made any more).

 

Shall I go that replacement route?

 

Or, if I am forced to keep my current motherboard, which module would you personally recommend?

 

I certainly would appreciate your answer(s).

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VS512MB400 would be Cass 2.5-3-3-8 and please provide a link to where you saw that.

 

Actually, there is no direct link. :(:

You would have to go to Corsair's Web site itself, and then go to the memory configurator for the particular motherboard. I do know that the Value Select is designed to be used only with the SPD-detected timings (CAS 2.5-3-3-8 in the case of the VS512MB400/VS1GBKIT400). But someone put up "2.5-3-3-6" next to the VS512MB400 on the compatible memory results page, which is misleading (in fact, the spec sheet for the VS512MB400 lists only CAS 2.5 with no other numbers).

 

On the other hand, the CMX512-3200C2 does have different SPD timings for DDR400, DDR333 and DDR266: CAS 3-3-3-8 @ DDR400, CAS 2.5-3-3-7 @ DDR333 and CAS 2-2-2-6 @ DDR266.

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We actually do not publish the timings for Value Select so I will get this removed or corrected. Thank you for the information. And Yes we publish the timings for all of our XMS modules.

 

Thanks. The timings should have been listed as "2.5-x-x-x" (where the "x"'s are the SPD-detected timings), not "2.5-3-3-6". (In the case of the VS512MB400C3, the "3-3-3-8" timings are correct even though they should really have been listed as "3-x-x-x".)

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UPDATE:

 

I've found that the low voltage of the D865PERL's DDR slots is killing even generic memory. I've ran Memtest86 on each module individually - and almost invariably, I get errors on one stick when I use any readily-available store-bought memory. (And yes, even the Value Select modules began showing errors on one stick - even if very few errors - when used with that motherboard.) No wonder why that system built on that D865PERL motherboard did not run as stable as I would have liked, with occasional program crashes and errors.

 

And due to the lack of any DDR voltage adjustment at all whatsoever, I might have to go with the System Select modules (which will cost as much as most of the XMS series modules due to their strict adherence to JEDEC memory standards) for that motherboard. But since I've already done a major CPU/mobo/video card/power supply upgrade (to the one listed in the system specs link under my username), why bother?

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  • Corsair Employees
Our Value Select modules should run great in that MB, I have no problem replacing your modules if you like. Please follow the link in my signature “I think I have a bad part!” and we will be happy to replace them or it!
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Our Value Select modules should run great in that MB, I have no problem replacing your modules if you like. Please follow the link in my signature “I think I have a bad part!” and we will be happy to replace them or it!

 

Actually, I've retested those same Value Select memory modules in another PC (my current rig), and they checked out with no errors even after running them overnight through Memtest86. The Intel motherboard itself is likely to blame, in this case. Also, the memory chips which ran on that Intel motherboard came out unusually cool to the touch even after running them nonstop for a week. (It should have come out slightly hot to the touch.)

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O.K. well I would agree with you, it sounds like there is a porblem with that MB and or CPU.

 

It's the MB. When I removed it from the case, I noticed the part of the circuit board where the CPU socket sits on has sagged when it should have been flat.

 

I should have checked for that when I first installed it in the case (which, by the way, now houses my current AMD components). Another sign of trouble is that the boxed Intel CPU heatsink would not sit flat on the CPU no matter what I tried; it seems that only the corners of the CPU's heat spreader even contacted the TIM of the heatsink.

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  • 3 months later...

I found out that it was my power supply that's screwing things up on that system. Some Intel motherboards load-test the rails such that a single rail should never exceed 240VA (or 20A on the +12V rail). But the PSU which I used on that rig, an Antec TrueControl 550W (the original, not the 2.0) has a +12V rail rated at 24A. It has been used a lot over the past two years, weakening its stability. When I used that Intel system, it was never as stable as I had hoped for.

 

I have replaced that PSU with an Antec SmartPower 2.0 500W unit, and all is going smoothly with that rig. It is now going into my backup/guest rig (which previously ran an AMD Athlon XP 2000+ Palomino-core CPU with a VIA KT266A chipset).

 

Until recently, I did not know that the choice of a PSU can affect system stability with an Intel platform.

 

And to think that I was blaming the mobo for my problems, when it was my old, heavily-used PSU that's really to blame.

 

For the record, the specs on the new backup/guest rig are as follows:

  • 2.80C GHz Intel Pentium 4 Processor
  • Intel D865PERLL Motherboard with ICH5R and IEEE1394A
  • 1GB (2x512MB) Corsair Value Select VS1GB400 Kit (2.5-3-3-8)
  • BFG GeForce 6800GT OC AGP8x
  • WD1200JB Hard Drive
  • NEC DVD+R Drive pulled from a Dell Dimension 8300 system belonging to my brother (the Dell has since been upgraded with a Sony dual-layer DVD+/-R/RW drive)
  • Turtle Beach Santa Cruz Sound Card (yes, this system needs a legacy joystick port)
  • Antec SX1035B Case upgraded with SmartPower 2.0 500W Power Supply Unit

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  • Corsair Employees
Well yes the PSU is one of the most over looked components and these newer systems are more critical with power than before. But at least you found the problem. Please let us know if you have any more questions!
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