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Cpu cooling help


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I have the all in one water cooling kit with Corsair and I noticed in the cpu block some stuff in the fins. I used to idle at around 30c and max out games at around 50c now I'm at an idle of 60c. I honestly don't know the issue and if so little junk could cause such I temps. I'm trying to figure out if it's a software or hardware issue. Please refer to image.  (Image)

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It looks like small pieces of maybe plasticizer but there is nowhere near enough to block the flow of the cpu channels. If the cpu block or anywhere else in the loop is blocked, you will see elevated coolant temperature to match, likely in the 50-60C range. You also can sometimes demonstrate the block is heavily restricted by shifting from a moderate pump speed to maximum while under load. In a normal system you might only see a 1C drop between something like 2400 rpm and the 4800 rpm max. If you run something mild like the CPU-Z stress test and going from 2xxxx rpm to 4800 drops the cpu temp 5-8C in 1 second or so, you have a flow restriction at the block. 
 

If the coolant temp is normal (4-7C above room temp) and the flow check above results in no change, then you are likely looking at a physical contact or voltage issue. Voltage is the easier thing to check. Make sure your Vcore is not pegged at the maximum when it should be at idle. This is for the 5900X?

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1 minute ago, c-attack said:

It looks like small pieces of maybe plasticizer but there is nowhere near enough to block the flow of the cpu channels. If the cpu block or anywhere else in the loop is blocked, you will see elevated coolant temperature to match, likely in the 50-60C range. You also can sometimes demonstrate the block is heavily restricted by shifting from a moderate pump speed to maximum while under load. In a normal system you might only see a 1C drop between something like 2400 rpm and the 4800 rpm max. If you run something mild like the CPU-Z stress test and going from 2xxxx rpm to 4800 drops the cpu temp 5-8C in 1 second or so, you have a flow restriction at the block. 
 

If the coolant temp is normal (4-7C above room temp) and the flow check above results in no change, then you are likely looking at a physical contact or voltage issue. Voltage is the easier thing to check. Make sure your Vcore is not pegged at the maximum when it should be at idle. This is for the 5900X?

Yes Ryzen 9 5900x

Tbh temps and that was fine but now I play a game and temps increase to 70 and sometimes my pc shuts down but ik it's no from cpu temps because it won't shutdown with a 70c temp I'm going to stress test my cpu with default settings to see results of crashes or what not.

how do I check if my Vcore is maxed or not?

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Peak Vcore is going to be around ~1.40v. You can see this in CUE and other programs like cpu-Z as well. The processor is capable of dropping load at the hardware level, so 1.40v doesn’t necessarily mean it’s fully loaded. More likely a light load. So you then need to compare this to your cpu activity in the task manager. Be aware most users on Win 11 cannot get an accurate CPU% reading from non-Windows sources as Microsoft threw a curve ball into the 22H2 build. Really you’re checking to make sure your pc is not working hard on something it should not be — bad programming, malware, etc.  

 

 

Another way to look at this is how fast the temps get high. CPU overworking or contact issues are instantaneous and you can stop in the BIOS and see it pegged at 70C. Liquid loop or flow issues will start off fine but slowly and continuously build up. So cpu temp is at 40C when you first boot, but 20 min of wen browsing later and it sits at 60C. That’s a flow problem. The liquid temp will keep climbing in step with cpu temp. 

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48 minutes ago, c-attack said:

Peak Vcore is going to be around ~1.40v. You can see this in CUE and other programs like cpu-Z as well. The processor is capable of dropping load at the hardware level, so 1.40v doesn’t necessarily mean it’s fully loaded. More likely a light load. So you then need to compare this to your cpu activity in the task manager. Be aware most users on Win 11 cannot get an accurate CPU% reading from non-Windows sources as Microsoft threw a curve ball into the 22H2 build. Really you’re checking to make sure your pc is not working hard on something it should not be — bad programming, malware, etc.  

 

 

Another way to look at this is how fast the temps get high. CPU overworking or contact issues are instantaneous and you can stop in the BIOS and see it pegged at 70C. Liquid loop or flow issues will start off fine but slowly and continuously build up. So cpu temp is at 40C when you first boot, but 20 min of wen browsing later and it sits at 60C. That’s a flow problem. The liquid temp will keep climbing in step with cpu temp. 

I turned off the performance boost overdrive and my peek core voltage is around 1.0-1.05 with temps around 49c. At the stock icue setup when I turned everything maxed its around 46c. So from normal to max it dropped cpu temp 3c while stress testing. So it's not a block in the water cooling?

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1 hour ago, c-attack said:

It looks like small pieces of maybe plasticizer but there is nowhere near enough to block the flow of the cpu channels. If the cpu block or anywhere else in the loop is blocked, you will see elevated coolant temperature to match, likely in the 50-60C range. You also can sometimes demonstrate the block is heavily restricted by shifting from a moderate pump speed to maximum while under load. In a normal system you might only see a 1C drop between something like 2400 rpm and the 4800 rpm max. If you run something mild like the CPU-Z stress test and going from 2xxxx rpm to 4800 drops the cpu temp 5-8C in 1 second or so, you have a flow restriction at the block. 
 

If the coolant temp is normal (4-7C above room temp) and the flow check above results in no change, then you are likely looking at a physical contact or voltage issue. Voltage is the easier thing to check. Make sure your Vcore is not pegged at the maximum when it should be at idle. This is for the 5900X?

I think I found the problem but don't know how to fix it I turned precision boost over drive on. And re did the stress test. Please look at the image I'm about to put (Image) when I looked at multiple yt vids I'm pretty sure the ppt cpu power Tdc and edc are not supposed to be in the red or almost maxed out. Thoughts?

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Voltage looks normal. Most Ryzen cpu owners idle in the 40s or about 10C more than typical Intel. That part is OK. However, beyond that I can’t tell you much about the graphs since I don’t use AMD.

 

Do you have a temperature sensor in the loop?  Typically you put it in the pump/reservoir in an unused port. This would be the most helpful in identifying a flow problem. It’s possible if that is plasticizer there is more in the cooling fins I can’t see. This can happen with clear plastic tubing, but if you used hard line tubing then my presumption is wrong. 

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43 minutes ago, c-attack said:

Voltage looks normal. Most Ryzen cpu owners idle in the 40s or about 10C more than typical Intel. That part is OK. However, beyond that I can’t tell you much about the graphs since I don’t use AMD.

 

Do you have a temperature sensor in the loop?  Typically you put it in the pump/reservoir in an unused port. This would be the most helpful in identifying a flow problem. It’s possible if that is plasticizer there is more in the cooling fins I can’t see. This can happen with clear plastic tubing, but if you used hard line tubing then my presumption is wrong. 

I used hardline tubing and the temps for the water are exactly as they were when I built the pc.

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OK, then whatever that stuff is on CPU cooling fins is not plasticizer and not likely blocking flow in any meaningful way.  This means you most likely are looking for a BIOS or CPU setting that changed during this time and the CPU temp increase is "natural", resulting from changes in voltage, load, frequency, etc.  I know that's not very specific or helpful in narrowing it down.  I assure you it is better than trying to clean gunk out of the CPU block, radiators, tubing, and all your fittings, so this is a step forward.  

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3 minutes ago, c-attack said:

OK, then whatever that stuff is on CPU cooling fins is not plasticizer and not likely blocking flow in any meaningful way.  This means you most likely are looking for a BIOS or CPU setting that changed during this time and the CPU temp increase is "natural", resulting from changes in voltage, load, frequency, etc.  I know that's not very specific or helpful in narrowing it down.  I assure you it is better than trying to clean gunk out of the CPU block, radiators, tubing, and all your fittings, so this is a step forward.  

Ye thx so much first I went through an emotional roller coaster when I found out my pc was only picking up 6 of the 12 cores are people told me my cpu was faulty however I was able to fix that by just resetting the profile on a software. But the high temperatures are still there I think I'm just going to leave it and if my ox has problems I'll take it to a technician. Thanks so much for the help!

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