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ASUS P4P800 Deluxe VS1GBKIT400 Problem


rramesh

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Hi,

 

I am no MB hacker or some one lives tweaking PCs. But I am a HW designer and therefore, I kind of know how things work (Although a little less about SDRAM/DDR). I bought VS1GBKIT400 Corsair memory and have been having problem getting it to work with my P4P800 Deluxe mobo with 420W Antec truepower powersupply with stock BIOS. Here is a copy of the message I sent to ramguy@corsair.com looking for support before I learnt about the existance of this forum

 

Hi,

 

I purchased 1GB VS1GBKIT400 - Retail package of value ram based on the recommendation of compatibility from you (Corsair website/ramguy recommendation for compatibility) for my ASUS P4P800 Deluxe MB. However, installing the memory made the system not POST at all. No beep no prompt - nothing. However the system works (and has been working) flawlessly with my previous XXXXXX 512MB DDR333 DIMM. Intially I thought that it is just my installation error and tried several different things to get the system working with Corsair memory. However, I cannot get the DIMMS to work as expected. Here is what I did and found out. Please help me resolve this problem.

 

1. The system has been working flawlessly with a 512MB DDR333 memory from XXXXXX until I bought this memory.

2. I removed the XXXXXX 512MB and installed VS1GBKIT400 DIMMS and the system would not POST or beep. It is dead.

3. I installed one module from VS1GBKIT400 at a time and at all four slots and the results are unchanged. There is no POST not prompt and no beep. The computer appears dead. I cleaned the DIMM slots suspecting dust, but no change in the result. The system would not POST with Corsair memory.

4. I repeatedly swapped the memory module from VS1GBKIT400 with XXXXXX DDR333 memory and repeatedly the system would boot with XXXXXX DIMM but not with VS1GBKIT400 DIMM. All of the above testing are with stock BIOS setting of the MB.

5. I began changing BIOS setting very carefully. I just changed the DIMM voltage and increased it to 2.55V. With this I can install one Corsair DIMM and it would POST and work properly. However placing *both* DIMMs will make my system *not* POST. The same result was achieved regarless of the DIMM slot I used.

6. I tried bumping DIMM voltage to 2.65 no change in result. I bumped it further to 2.75V. I see that the system would POST (with both DIMM in teh Corsair kit installed) and tried to BOOT OS. However OS dies in the middle of BOOT with various kernel panic messages showing a lot of memory errors.

7. I bumped up the voltage to 2.85 (the maximum my mother board would allow) but still same result as in 6. Then I tried a combination of the XXXXXX DIMM and one Corsair DIMM. I could get the system work at 2.55V (just as if I installed just one Corsair DIMM like in item 5) in dual channel mode(!) but at DDR333 speed as the XXXXXX is a DDRR333 memory. This is the setting I have left my system for the past 24 hours and it seems stable.

 

Now here are my questions

 

1. Is the above indication of just a bad part and I should be ok if I RMA'ed for a new DIMM pair?

2. Are there other tests that I can do (I am an engineer, but have only limited knowledge of how DRAMs work) to understand the situation a bit better? Obviously, I do not want to do something that will break my MB.

3. Do you have any other advice for me to resolve the problem?

 

Please help.

 

Thanks and Regards

Ramesh

 

 

Thanks in advance for your help

Ramesh

 

PS. It looks like competitors name become XXXX. Well if that is the rule then that is fine.

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Ramesh,

Our email address is ramguy@corsairmemory.com.

And can you tell me the make and model of MB you have along with the CPU speed and it’s FSB as well? In addition, please tell me the bios settings you have set for both CPU and memory and any performance settings that you may have set?

 

I typed the e-mail wrong in my message. I did send to ramguy@corsairmemory.com.

 

I thought I mentioned the MB model right at the subject line. It is Asus P4P800 Deluxe and the CPU is genuine intel P4 2.40C (My invoice says intel Pentium 4 2.4C Northwood 800MHz FSB Socket 478 Processor Model BX80532PG2400D - Retail) My bios settings are unchanged from the standard setting except for the DDR voltage bumped up as my message describes. It is currently at 2.55V with just one stick from the VS1GBKIT400 and another 512MB stick DDR333 from XXX.

 

Please read my previous message, it describes in detail all of the info with the exception of processor details.

 

I have not overclocked or changed any BIOS setting except DDR voltage. Everything is at auto setting or stock values that came with the board BIOS.

 

If you need anything more specific, please ask. I will reboot my machine and get the exact info from the BIOS screen.

 

Regards

Ramesh

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You should not mix memory with most MB's, and I would just use our module and set the Dim Voltage to 2.75 Volts and then run http://www.memtest.org on them one at a time and you will need to disable legacy USB in the bios when running this program.

 

I understand that I should not mix memory. This mixing is part of the experiment I explained in my report. I will run memtest as soon as I get home as you desribe and post results for your further analysis.

 

Regards

Ramesh

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Have you tried to put your memories back and clear your MoBo CMOS? I saw this many times when changed memories, and a CMOS cleaning always helped me, even with all settings on AUTO.

 

BTW, if that worked and you managed to use those memories as Dual Channel, please run some 3D tests (like Aquamark or 3DMark) and tell me if you got visual artifacts too. I got these same MoBo and CPU and having some troubles. Only solved with a i875-based MoBo -- as everyone i found with this combo did.

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No problem, please let me know.

Ramguy,

 

I did what you said. That is did not mix the different rams, installed one ram at a time set the voltage to 2.75V and ran memtest. The memtest finished over three passes with no errors. However strange things happened after that

 

1) First reboot with the last installed stick into Linux booted ok until I started X windows. But when I did that, the system went dead.

2) I hit reset bu the system will not POST!!!!

3) Powerdown change the stick and reboot. The OS now has kernel panis trying to do illegal null pointer dereference.

4) On next boot file system got corrupted. At this poing I gave up experimenting and put back my original competitors memory and the system reboots properly

5) I reset DDR voltage to auto and fix the file system problem and the system is operational without Corsair memory.

 

Too bad a compatible memory is giving me so much trouble.

 

In the mean time I got a e-mail response from Corsair tech support (ramguy@corsairxxx.com) asking me to upgrade my BIOS and set most of the voltages manually and try running memtest.

 

Now I am really scared of flashing BIOS after what happened. Is flashing easy when instructions are followed?

 

Regards

Ramesh

 

 

Regards

Ramesh

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Have you tried to put your memories back and clear your MoBo CMOS? I saw this many times when changed memories, and a CMOS cleaning always helped me, even with all settings on AUTO.

 

BTW, if that worked and you managed to use those memories as Dual Channel, please run some 3D tests (like Aquamark or 3DMark) and tell me if you got visual artifacts too. I got these same MoBo and CPU and having some troubles. Only solved with a i875-based MoBo -- as everyone i found with this combo did.

 

What do you mean by clear Mobo CMOS? each time I have failure it says overclocking failed!! I am not overclocking anything. But still says so.

 

Now I am asked to update the BIOS version by Corsair tech support (that s also ramguy, although may be a different person). Is this safe to do? I am kind of scared updating BIOS. Any help appreciated.

 

Regards

Ramesh

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What do you mean by clear Mobo CMOS? each time I have failure it says overclocking failed!! I am not overclocking anything. But still says so.

 

Now I am asked to update the BIOS version by Corsair tech support (that s also ramguy, although may be a different person). Is this safe to do? I am kind of scared updating BIOS. Any help appreciated.

 

Regards

Ramesh

Clear CMOS is a safe procedure. You power off your machine, unplug power supply cord, locate a jumper way near CMOS battery and move it to position 1-2 for a couple of seconds. Then put it back in place (pos 2-3), plug your power supply cord back and turn on machine.

 

Upgrade your BIOS is also safe. Use AsusUpdate from your Asus install CD. To do that, you will need to first update your AsusUpdate then select latest STABLE BIOS 1019. All that is done inside Windows, there are some tips in this process, so chances to you do some mistake are barely minimal. If even this way something went wrong, you could put Asus install CD on your first CD-ROM unit and just after power on your machine press Ctrl+F2 to force motherboard itself to search for a working BIOS version from CD. Manual also explains this last step, so if you are in a hurry, take a look back to your motherboard manual.

 

If you still "too scared" to do that, take your machine at some techie store and ask them to do that for you.

 

About that overclocking warning message, it's normal on new Asus motherboards. this is the easy overlocking "feature". If you power on your machine, then while it still doing POST (memory counting, via raid initializing, etc) and you power it down, next time you power up it will show you that annoying warning. No need to worry by it.

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Clear CMOS is a safe procedure. You power off your machine, unplug power supply cord, locate a jumper way near CMOS battery and move it to position 1-2 for a couple of seconds. Then put it back in place (pos 2-3), plug your power supply cord back and turn on machine.

 

Upgrade your BIOS is also safe. Use AsusUpdate from your Asus install CD. To do that, you will need to first update your AsusUpdate then select latest STABLE BIOS 1019. All that is done inside Windows, there are some tips in this process, so chances to you do some mistake are barely minimal. If even this way something went wrong, you could put Asus install CD on your first CD-ROM unit and just after power on your machine press Ctrl+F2 to force motherboard itself to search for a working BIOS version from CD. Manual also explains this last step, so if you are in a hurry, take a look back to your motherboard manual.

 

If you still "too scared" to do that, take your machine at some techie store and ask them to do that for you.

 

About that overclocking warning message, it's normal on new Asus motherboards. this is the easy overlocking "feature". If you power on your machine, then while it still doing POST (memory counting, via raid initializing, etc) and you power it down, next time you power up it will show you that annoying warning. No need to worry by it.

 

Thanks for the detailed info. You are very helpful. My BIOS version is 1012 which is quite old by looking at the version number 1019. Also at the time I bough my motherboard (in 2003) DDR 400 and many of the memory modules were not very common. I also see a mention of MCH code rewrite in one of the BIOS version description. So I think BIOS update is needed. The current Asus website talks about AFUDOS as the recommended procedure for P4P800 MBs. Do you think Asusupdate is better (or easier?) what do you mean by update the Asusupdate? Download the latest version? or do you mean that AsusUpdate itself has a way of updating itself (like most of the selft updating software)? In any case I am a engineer and feel I need to be bold :): and should do the BIOS update myself. If I screwup may be I will learn more. BTW, I am a linux user (hacker to some extent) and not an expert in Windows. This also another reason why I am skeptical about working with anything to do with DOS/Windows - I just don't know enough.

 

BTW, I did not give you some info about running graphics intensive apps with the Corsair mem. Earlier, Ramguy had asked me to run memtest and I did what I was told (read my last messge to him) and when I rebooted after the test strange things happened. First the OS booted properly all the way to login prompt (I am a linux guy) and when I logged in and tried to start X window system the computer crashed (screen blank and no activity) after that it simply would not POST without powering it down and changing to another stick of the corsair. After that too the OS boot would fail with illegal null point reference. So, pretty much that access to Video card just killed everything and I had to go back to my old memory stick to get the system working. Now I am bit annoyed with Corsair for stating that their memory is compatible with P4P800 Deluxe.

 

BTW, are you running with Corsair VS1GBKIT400 in your system? If so is everything ok except for the video artifact that you allude to?

 

I greatly appreciate you taking the time to respond to me eventhough I am not doing anything in return.

 

Regards

Ramesh

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Clear CMOS is a safe procedure. You power off your machine, unplug power supply cord, locate a jumper way near CMOS battery and move it to position 1-2 for a couple of seconds. Then put it back in place (pos 2-3), plug your power supply cord back and turn on machine.

 

Upgrade your BIOS is also safe. Use AsusUpdate from your Asus install CD. To do that, you will need to first update your AsusUpdate then select latest STABLE BIOS 1019. All that is done inside Windows, there are some tips in this process, so chances to you do some mistake are barely minimal. If even this way something went wrong, you could put Asus install CD on your first CD-ROM unit and just after power on your machine press Ctrl+F2 to force motherboard itself to search for a working BIOS version from CD. Manual also explains this last step, so if you are in a hurry, take a look back to your motherboard manual.

 

If you still "too scared" to do that, take your machine at some techie store and ask them to do that for you.

 

About that overclocking warning message, it's normal on new Asus motherboards. this is the easy overlocking "feature". If you power on your machine, then while it still doing POST (memory counting, via raid initializing, etc) and you power it down, next time you power up it will show you that annoying warning. No need to worry by it.

 

Sorry, I have responded to you asking a bunch of questions without looking at the manual. Let me take a look at the manual and then ask questions. Please ignore my questions in my last message but read it for other information. I will do the BIOS update and clear CMOS and see what I get. After that I pose questions if I still do not have answers to the problem.

 

Hopefully, this way you won't get bored with trivial stuff. (By the way I took a look at your PC and it is awsome :!: )

 

Thanks and Regards

Ramesh

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And F.Y.I.

The Springdale chipsets in general have been in our lab at least not as good at over clocking as Canterwood chipsets. But the report of artifacts would suggest a bios issue and I would try the latest beta bios that posted on ftp.asus.com.tw (ONLY) stay away from the German site or any other non ASUS site. Except http://www.asusforums.org has some great people and a few ASUS employees hang out there as well.

But I would check the AGP settings and maybe try another Video card to test with and I would set the AGP apature to a minimum of 128 Meg as well.

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Clear CMOS is a safe procedure. You power off your machine, unplug power supply cord, locate a jumper way near CMOS battery and move it to position 1-2 for a couple of seconds. Then put it back in place (pos 2-3), plug your power supply cord back and turn on machine.

 

Upgrade your BIOS is also safe. Use AsusUpdate from your Asus install CD. To do that, you will need to first update your AsusUpdate then select latest STABLE BIOS 1019. All that is done inside Windows, there are some tips in this process, so chances to you do some mistake are barely minimal. If even this way something went wrong, you could put Asus install CD on your first CD-ROM unit and just after power on your machine press Ctrl+F2 to force motherboard itself to search for a working BIOS version from CD. Manual also explains this last step, so if you are in a hurry, take a look back to your motherboard manual.

 

If you still "too scared" to do that, take your machine at some techie store and ask them to do that for you.

 

About that overclocking warning message, it's normal on new Asus motherboards. this is the easy overlocking "feature". If you power on your machine, then while it still doing POST (memory counting, via raid initializing, etc) and you power it down, next time you power up it will show you that annoying warning. No need to worry by it.

 

Ok, I read the manual and tried my best. I do not know how to update the AsusUpdate itself.

 

Also, I am behind the firewall with dialup. I setup my connection wizard and connect using internet explorer after setting up the proxies. Now what is this proxy setting inside AsusUpdate?

 

While I am able to connect using explorer (in fact I am sending this message in explorer) to every where Asusupdate fails repeatedly and says "too many users try later" message. Is this normal or am I doing something wrong with the AsusUpdate utility?

 

I will try another hour or so. If that fails, I am going AFUDOS way.

 

Regards

Ramesh

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Ramesh

I also went back and read thru your posts. And what you have posted would suggest a possible power problem. Do you have another PSU you can test with and you should be using at least a 450 Watt PSU if its a name brand and 500 Watt if its generic.

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Ramesh

I also went back and read thru your posts. And what you have posted would suggest a possible power problem. Do you have another PSU you can test with and you should be using at least a 450 Watt PSU if its a name brand and 500 Watt if its generic.

 

To give you an idea of load, I have 3 hard disks (8GB IBM, 80GB Maxtor, 160GB seagate) 2 CD drives (1 CDRW/ 1 DVDRW) and 1 video card (Nvidia ti 4200) and one NIC (10/100mbit) apart form the assortment of things on that came with MB.

 

Given the above, do you think my Antec Truepower 420W is not enough? That is the best PSU I have. The only other one is a 300 watt (Antec xxx). You think even with just one stick I need 450W? (Remember the kind of troubles I had lately are with just one stcik and I was running fine for 24 hours with two mixed memory sticks - one Corsair and another XXXX)

 

BTW, when I was running with mixed set of sticks, I was running ony 320Mhz (DDR320). Should I try lower clock with Corsair sticks also? Alternatively I could try disconnecting some hard disks or CDROM drives or may be even case fans just to try out. Let me know.

 

Honestly, I will be really feeling bad if this 420W PSU won't be enough.

 

In the next hour or so I will be online after that I will try to flash the latest BIOS. Wish me luck.

 

Regards

Ramesh

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It would really depend on the system configuration. However, when over clocking you will want your PSU to have about 30% more power than you actually need to the power you do use is clean and stable. And with PSU's its not so much what they are rated at MAX as it is how much they can consistantly produce and most 400 Watt PSU's would be about 300 Watts max continous, and with your Configuration you would need about 350 Watts +.
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It would really depend on the system configuration. However, when over clocking you will want your PSU to have about 30% more power than you actually need to the power you do use is clean and stable. And with PSU's its not so much what they are rated at MAX as it is how much they can consistantly produce and most 400 Watt PSU's would be about 300 Watts max continous, and with your Configuration you would need about 350 Watts +.

 

I am not sure if 350+ need is with or without overclocking. I never overclock my system. BTW, it is 430W true power - not that 10W matters.

 

In any case, I should be able to get the memory working after I disconnect a few drives. I am sure 430W power supply would be enough to power CPU+2Disks+video+1GB Corsair memory. Don't you agree?

 

If you do, then let us get the memory working with that configuration. Then I will investigate if it is a PSU problem by additing other drives/services. Does this plan look reasonable to you?

 

BTW, I flashed my BIOS successfully to the latest version available on the ASUS website (http://www.asus.com.tw)

 

Regards

Ramesh

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It would really depend on the system configuration. However, when over clocking you will want your PSU to have about 30% more power than you actually need to the power you do use is clean and stable. And with PSU's its not so much what they are rated at MAX as it is how much they can consistantly produce and most 400 Watt PSU's would be about 300 Watts max continous, and with your Configuration you would need about 350 Watts +.

 

Ok, I flashed the BIOS to latest version, set the voltage to 2.75 and other SPD parameters as techsupport mail said (2.5-3-3-8 DDR400 with legacy USB support disabled etc) and gave a spin with memtest. This is what I found.

 

1) Both sticks failed miserably in test #4, #5 and #6 (I did not care to go after that). The errors were all over the address space with upper byte (of the 32bit tests) crapping out most of the time.

 

2) I disconnected one device at atime from power supply to check out the "PSU not adequate theory" and that did not change anything. Exact same errors in similar address spaces with similer upper 8 bits failing. Some times the reboot would fail memory test right at the BIOS level.

 

After this, I could not figure out why my previous memory tests were passing (before BIOS update). So I went back to my notes and checked. This is what I found

 

1) With old BIOS, the system had DDR auto frequency deduced to 198 Mhz (DDR396) (as reported by memtest) and may be this was marginally sufficient to pass the stand alone memtest but not a fullfledged OS.

 

2) In a mixed scenario (one Corsair and another XXX DDR333 DIMM), the system was running the whole memorey at 320Mhz. This is easily handled by Corsair memory - it is supposed to be DDR400. In fact, I ran the memtest with new BIOS forcing the DDR freq to 320Mhz and sure enougth the memtest passes.

 

Thus the memories do not run at 400Mhz as per my testing. Let me know if you agree with my analysis. Also, I like to get your suggestion on what I should do next.

 

Regards

Ramesh

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rramesh

While I would agree the memory is not running at DDR400, your conclusions I don’t agree with. Getting failures with both modules would suggest some other problem. No matter who's memory you were using I would suspect some other problem, just because it would be unlikely you got 2 failing modules, especially from us. But I have no problem replacing your modules if you want to try that.

Please follow the link in my signature “I think I have a bad part!” and we will be happy to replace them or it!

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rramesh

While I would agree the memory is not running at DDR400, your conclusions I don’t agree with. Getting failures with both modules would suggest some other problem. No matter who's memory you were using I would suspect some other problem, just because it would be unlikely you got 2 failing modules, especially from us. But I have no problem replacing your modules if you want to try that.

Please follow the link in my signature “I think I have a bad part!” and we will be happy to replace them or it!

 

In principle, I agree with the statement that "it is very unlikely both modules are defective". The probablity does not favor this kind of scenario. But probability works only in random selection. These are closely matched pieces - at least that is the impression I get, when you buy a 2x512MB kit. Therefore it is likely both are marginally less than DDR400 and thus both fail.

 

In spite of that what I said, I am willing to try any other suggestion that you have. Please suggest any other experiments that I can run without having to spend money (at least not a lot of money). I really want make this work. If you think replacement is the only experiment that I can do, I will try first with my e-tailer from whom I bought the memory. If he refuses to replace, then I will contact you.

 

But, please do let me know if there are any other experiments that I can do to identify where the problem is.

 

Regards

Ramesh

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Lets try replacing your modules, but again I think you may find its some other issue. Or if you have a friend that can help you test the modules in another system that would isolate the memory from your system and may tell us quickly if its the memory or not.
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  • 3 weeks later...
Lets try replacing your modules, but again I think you may find its some other issue. Or if you have a friend that can help you test the modules in another system that would isolate the memory from your system and may tell us quickly if its the memory or not.

 

Ramguy,

 

I could not replace the memory (due to my travel) and therefore I returned it in the hope that I will reorder. Before I reorder, I am wondering if an XMS kit will be better considering the kind of trouble I had. In particular, will I have better luck with TWINX1024-3200C2PT? This is more expensive (again, I do not overclock) but I do not mind if you know some specifics (that are not public) that makes you believe that this will have better compatibility. Please advise, if I am simply wasting money.

 

Thanks and Regards

Ramesh

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XMS modules are tested at a higher level and would be better memory with out a doubt. So yes if you can afford them I would suggest XMS. And you can follow the link in my signature for the tested settings of those modules.
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Sorry to latch on to the end of this, but my problem dates back a long time and I sort og gave up on it.

 

I built a system around a P4P 800 deluxe mobo and had 2 512 Mb sticks of Corsair RAM.

 

The ASUS website did not list Corsair as compatible at the time and I experienced symptoms of memory leaks (i.e. crashes out to hard re-boots).

 

I swapped the memory for Samsung (which the site said was compatible) but this is even worse, in that the computer will not even boot.

 

I thought RAM would either just work or not work, but from reading this forum it may have been my settings that were wrong (and may still be on the new RAM).

 

How do I go about determining what settings should be used in situations like this?

Should the Mobo and RAM just work?

 

I have a p4 2.8, Antec case, DVD writer and DVD/CDRW combo and 2 HDDs.

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