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100C: H60 & i7


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I have had an H60 installed on an ASUS Sabertooth x79 with an Intel i7 3820 for over 5 years. Since I moved the system runs so hot that it throttles (100 degrees Celsius on all 4 cores). What do you recommend?

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Check the pump is actually moving the liquid (touch the tubes), reseat CPU, repaste, reconnect everything basically.  Did you move the system without breaking it down or did you move the system to another case, etc?  Your post does not make it clear.  Also, which temps were you seeing before?

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I did not disassemble the system. It worked for a few months, but slowly, with temperatures in the low 60s. Yesterday the extreme heat started. One tube is noticeably warmer than the other. The radiator fan is working. The BIOS says the CPU fan 4500 RPM, CPU OPT fan 1600 RPM. Heat builds 1 degree every 1-2 seconds until the system stops.

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4 hours ago, mslinn said:

Heat builds 1 degree every 1-2 seconds until the system stops

That is usually the telltale sign of a complete flow blockage.

It's usually gunk building up somewhere in the pump block, it happens with age. Moving the build may have dislodged some of it and completely stopped the flow, despite the pump running correctly.

Sounds like retirement for that AIO unfortunately.

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Thanks for letting me know. Much as I do not like the news, I appreciate not wasting my time trying to ride on a dead horse.

The warranty is 5 years, and this unit is 5 years and 6 months old. Sigh.

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well it's actually still impressive to me given that your CPU is a 130W TDP chip, cooled with a 120mm AIO. the poor thing has been working overtime for 5 years.

If your case can accomodate a 240mm, it would likely have an easier life. 120mm AIOs are usually best suited for lower power chips, or small form factor cases where you can't fit bigger.

 

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In truth, this system has always struggled to perform. Not only does it not have enough cooling, but the drive C bandwidth maxes out a lot, so the system is not responsive. I just want to keep this box going until DDR5 becomes more mainstream. I hope December will show advances.

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I wonder if extreme dust is actually the problem:

0623221012_HDR_2.thumb.jpg.a9ecb5292eb113ac285dcfc2b1d590e5.jpg

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oh my f***..

YES it may have a SIGHT impact on airflow and cooling lol

that's one caked radiator. try with a clean rad and you may have saved yourself an AIO. no waterflow, or no air flow will in the end have the same effect.

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After cleaning, it booted and showed 75 degrees, when running without any load. However, while attempting to load Chrome, it hit 99 degrees on all cores.

I just pulled out a Cooler Master RR-B10-212P-G1 Hyper 212 Plus from another system that I am not using. Let's see if that works better.

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OMG, I have to completely disassemble both systems in order to move the backplate for the fan mount from the old system to the new. Hmm. Maybe it would be worth buying another AIO instead.

The Antec P184 chassis can only accommodate 120 mm fans, dual fans (240 mm) is not an option.

The failed unit is a Corsair H60 (2018) 57.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler. I think this is the same model.

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That is the 2018 H60 (white LED) which is the direct replacement for your older 2013 released H60. Both of those are non-software coolers. It needs SATA for power and a place on the MB to connect the fan. Be aware the 2018 H60 has a white led that will stay on when the unit has power. There also is a H60i XT with software control if you want a unit with controllable lighting and programmable fan curves. 
 

While that dust was having an impact on your cooling for sure, if you clear it and cpu temp still skip counts up to 75C in 30 seconds after boot, you still have a flow issue.  This is the inevitable demise of most “no maintenance” cooling systems. Eventually the flow path gets blocked at the narrowest point (cpu block) as anti-corrosives fall out of suspension over the years. It’s time for a new unit. 

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Posted (edited)

I replaced the H60 and temperatures are 40s-50s (C). Yay!

The long-standing issue with this system is the saturated drive C on boot, for 5-10 minutes: image.thumb.png.18683bcb44c7128827fdaf11284dffcd.png

Average response time: 68 ms!!!!! WTF? The drive is good. I have replaced it several times over the years, and this is consistent between all the drives. Must be due to some other system component.

Ideas why, and what I might do about that?

Thanks!
Mike

Edited by mslinn
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BTW, after the system settles down, Average response time is 4-12 ms.

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well your C drive is a HDD, not a SSD, so that's "normal".. spinning rust is slow and your boot takes forever because the CPU spends most of its time waiting for the drive to send it data.

Not much you can do besides replacing it with a SSD. That may be the biggest boost you can give to your system for the money

Edit : the 68ms may be due to the fact the drive is working hard booting windows, so you basically see skip time here, the time for the head to constantly move from sector to sector. the transfer speed is also slow because it's probably doing a hundred things at the same time. you're slowed down by mechanics.

For a boot drive : SSD 🙂

Edited by LeDoyen
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Posted (edited)

OK. I just bought a 2 TB SSD SATA3 for the same price as what I paid for a 60 GB SATA (original spec) back in the day. I ended up not using it because it was too small. I am looking forward to enjoying better performance with this old rig once the SSD replaces C:.

I just want this system to last until DDR5 becomes a little more mainstream, then leapfrog DDR4; This system (my main workstation) is DDR3; I want the next system to be DDR5... or so I think at the present time... subject to more information ....

Edited by mslinn
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for just a boot drive you can get 500Gb SSDs for under 50 bucks. Even when you'll have your new rig, this will give your current one a massive boost and give it a new lease of life. i'm talking boot times in seconds, no more 10 minutes of HDD grinding, apps opening instantaneously etc. just massively more snappy.

it's no slouch of a DDR3 rig you have, so it's totally worth it.

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Posted (edited)

I got a 2 TB SATA SSD, as a boot disk, then a 4TB NVMe on a,PCIE card, and it works much faster. Maybe I won't upgrade for a while, the system responds quite well now.  🙂

Edited by mslinn
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you can wait comfortably for 13th or 14th gen now 😛

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Yes, but I am concerned about the huge power drain those processors have. Seems they can draw over 200 watts. Rip-snortin' fer sure, but I wonder how linearly compute power scales with power draw.

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the huge power draw is to hit the boost frequency for short loads. on extended load, a 12900k i set to 125W.

It's not the power draw you should worry about but cooling 🙂 if you want to unlock the boost duration, the limit is cooling, and not electrical power.  Now is it worth it? depends on what you do. For gaming, it most likely isn't. For intensive calculation, it's worth considering.

Even "older" CPUs when unlocked can draw a lot of power.  but it scales very badly. my 10900k for example will boost two cores to 5.3Ghz at 125W. If i unlock to boost all cores at that frequency, i'll be around 300W for only a few more points in benchmarks.

Now, the new generations make overclocking a bit superfluous, and you better have more than an AIO to unlock them. To be honest you're good to go at base settings.

Also one thing to consider is how much cooling advanced since the generation you're on.

i used to overheat a 2700k over 80W.

the 8700K was notoriously hot for not much more power.

They introduced soldered IHS and the 9900k was easier to push because it cooled better

now the 10900k can take over 250W all day because of thinned die (but it was stil speced at 125W maximum)

The 12900k is spec'ed at 241w if your cooler can take it, then it would fall back to 125w.

Now, your 3rd gen i7 is... 130W 🙂 so technically, a pegged 12900k will use less power, run cooler and be orders of magnitude faster.

If you have good cooling, you can unlock boost duration, let it run at 240W and enjoy shorter calculation times. but no, twice the power won't make it twice faster. you'll gain a few % at best. Some people want all it can give and will do it, others will just prefer a cooler and silent system and leave intel limits on.

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