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Pump Fluctuations on H80i (2015) Question


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I've been wanted to say its been a year since I made a topic about CPU temps in stress testing, but I have decided to plug the usb dongle onto my h80i v1, and looking at the pump speed. In the bios, it was 2319rpm on cpu fan 1, but on Windows, the rpm was at 2219rpm. Sometimes the pump fluctuates like the rpm dipped at 2123 rpm, then backs up at 2200rpm. Most of the time it was around 2221 rpm. This is being read in Corsair version 4 as ICUE doesn't detect my cooler, even when using legacy hardware version of Icue. I'd also discovered that HWInfo64 detected my h80i and decided to keep an eye on the pump and coolant temp. I'd noticed something alarmingly as the pump's rpm dipped around 1918rpm, then a second later it went back to 2200rpm. I'm more worried about that drop as I had my h80i for like almost 7 years from now. I know HWinfo64 may have inaccurate sensors, but to my hunch, I decided to switch to Corsair Link 4 and keeping an eye on the pump's rpm for that 1918rpm. As such, I've been keeping an eye on this ever since I've plugged that dongle in. Despite such drop, does this seems kinda normal for a 7 year old h80i or is it time to die? I can try checking back into the bios for the pumps rpm and see if it drips there.

I still haven't decided about reapplying the thermal paste since the temps in normal usage are in the acceptable range and no coolant problems as when I'm playing GTA 5, the coolant temp rose to like 31.4-34c as well as cpu temps are in the late 50s - early 60s range. If the cooler fails, I'll look for a new cpu cooler. I'm just wondering if fluctations like I have are normal for a 7 year old AIO. ><

Edited by RyougaLolakie
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34 minutes ago, RyougaLolakie said:

the coolant temp rose to like 31.4-34c as well as cpu temps are in the late 50s - early 60s range.

You definitely do not have a cooling problem at this time.  Your room/environment temp is the base or lowest possible level of coolant temp, so if you are in the low 30s at load everything is working well.  Hard to say on the pump RPM.  The motherboard and Link may poll at two different times or it might be wobbling a bit.  However, most high speed devices are going to have some variance and it won't read 2300 flat all the time.  What will be more worrisome is if you star to see low and high speed fluctuations (2300-1900-2500-1900, etc).  That's usually a sign the pump is losing its grip.  More often its the flow path that becomes the limitation and you'll see elevated base temperatures with no load.  That is a definite sign its time to start looking for a replacement.  

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10 minutes ago, c-attack said:

You definitely do not have a cooling problem at this time.  Your room/environment temp is the base or lowest possible level of coolant temp, so if you are in the low 30s at load everything is working well.  Hard to say on the pump RPM.  The motherboard and Link may poll at two different times or it might be wobbling a bit.  However, most high speed devices are going to have some variance and it won't read 2300 flat all the time.  What will be more worrisome is if you star to see low and high speed fluctuations (2300-1900-2500-1900, etc).  That's usually a sign the pump is losing its grip.  More often its the flow path that becomes the limitation and you'll see elevated base temperatures with no load.  That is a definite sign its time to start looking for a replacement.  

What you mean is that the high speed fluctuations such as 2300-1900-2500-1900 etc are like in 1 second intervals or does it happen in a few seconds or few minutes at a time? Like, I did see the 1918 rpm fluctuation on HWinfo64 for one bit then it went back up to 2200s and it stayed there most of the time. Right now, I don't see that happening on corsair link 4 yet but will kept an eye out. The coolant temp right now is 26.5 as I'm typing to reply this thread and when that pump rpm fluctuation happened, the coolant temp didn't increase one bit. 

 

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13 minutes ago, RyougaLolakie said:

uch as 2300-1900-2500-1900 etc are like in 1 second intervals

Yes, like each time it polls.  I can't remember for the H80i and Link, but it's likely to be every 1-2 seconds for updates.  If you see a dramatically different number every 2 seconds, things are starting to wear out.  It's not uncommon to see the pump speed drop 100 rpm at uneven intervals, but return to a normal baseline.  It could be a bubble, pressure change, or something fairly ordinary.  However, pump overspeed mixed with drops is a definitely warning sign.  When users show up and their pump is running several hundred RPM too fast for the setting, you don't have a lot of time before a critical error occurs.  

 

In terms of consistency, I would stick with the Link reading.  It is the native sensor and software.  Most likely HWiNFO or the MB is reading it at a different time and it's taking a number of rotations for the 2 seconds (or whatever) and multiplying out by 30 to make it revolutions per minute.  That means fractional rev count changes are multiplied by 30 as well, so anything +-100 rpm is normal.  Also, be careful running HWiNFO at the same time as Link.  It is not as devastating as when paired with CUE 4, but they still can mess each other up trying to access the device at the same time.  If you need HWiNFO for other reasons, engage the Asetek protection in the safety tab or right click on the H80i and tell HWiNFO not to monitor the Corsair internal devices.  Wacky RPM reporting is a common byproduct of the two software programs stepping on each other.  

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12 minutes ago, c-attack said:

Yes, like each time it polls.  I can't remember for the H80i and Link, but it's likely to be every 1-2 seconds for updates.  If you see a dramatically different number every 2 seconds, things are starting to wear out.  It's not uncommon to see the pump speed drop 100 rpm at uneven intervals, but return to a normal baseline.  It could be a bubble, pressure change, or something fairly ordinary.  However, pump overspeed mixed with drops is a definitely warning sign.  When users show up and their pump is running several hundred RPM too fast for the setting, you don't have a lot of time before a critical error occurs.  

 

In terms of consistency, I would stick with the Link reading.  It is the native sensor and software.  Most likely HWiNFO or the MB is reading it at a different time and it's taking a number of rotations for the 2 seconds (or whatever) and multiplying out by 30 to make it revolutions per minute.  That means fractional rev count changes are multiplied by 30 as well, so anything +-100 rpm is normal.  Also, be careful running HWiNFO at the same time as Link.  It is not as devastating as when paired with CUE 4, but they still can mess each other up trying to access the device at the same time.  If you need HWiNFO for other reasons, engage the Asetek protection in the safety tab or right click on the H80i and tell HWiNFO not to monitor the Corsair internal devices.  Wacky RPM reporting is a common byproduct of the two software programs stepping on each other.  

I'll disable the monitoring of h80i coolant temp and pump in hwinfo64 as well as uncheck CorsairLink and Asetek Support from Corsair's site about hwinfo64/corsairlink conflcts. Here's the image of the coolant temp and pump speed while running RetroArch in the background and Edge. 

Reading on what you said about the overspeed pump rpms mixed with drops sounds really scary. And Looking at Link right now, I did see it dropped to 2068rpm and that kinda worries me, even though the coolant temp stays the same and it was just a drop. Does this seem normal at this time? I'd apologized for repeating the same questions.  . 

 

Clipboard02clinkpumpcoolant.png

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This looks pretty steady to me.  If you are experiencing the over/under speed condition, the jumps are going to be large.  Something like 2200->1900->2000->2500->2300->1900 every 2 seconds.  It's a roller coaster ride and most users hear the pump shifting up and down before they visually notice in monitoring.  Most dying pumps will audibly let you know there is trouble.  Also, this over-revving condition is most often found in relatively new pumps and is indicative of a production issue.  If your pump has lasted 7 years, it's obviously a very good sample and I think this type of behavior in highly unlikely for your unit. 

 

Most closed loop AIO units will come to an end because the the flow path becomes clogged over a period of years.  It is a 'zero maintenance' product and anything like that has a definite shelf life.  As the flow path narrows or become restricted in a certain spot, the flow rate slows as you will see elevated coolant temperatures, even when there is minimal load. After heating things up a bit through normal load, it will take an extremely long time for the coolant levels to come down -- possibly not until you shut down and reboot hours later.  For you this would look something like 34C coolant at idle and it keeps slowly creeping up.  Then maybe mid 40s when under load and it stays there after you quit.  Your temps look good and if the coolant temp quickly drops over 2-3 minutes after load stops, you have a fully functional, healthy system.  

Edited by c-attack
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39 minutes ago, c-attack said:

This looks pretty steady to me.  If you are experiencing the over/under speed condition, the jumps are going to be large.  Something like 2200->1900->2000->2500->2300->1900 every 2 seconds.  It's a roller coaster ride and most users hear the pump shifting up and down before they visually notice in monitoring.  Most dying pumps will audibly let you know there is trouble.  Also, this over-revving condition is most often found in relatively new pumps and is indicative of a production issue.  If your pump has lasted 7 years, it's obviously a very good sample and I think this type of behavior in highly unlikely for your unit. 

 

Most closed loop AIO units will come to an end because the the flow path becomes clogged over a period of years.  It is a 'zero maintenance' product and anything like that has a definite shelf life.  As the flow path narrows or become restricted in a certain spot, the flow rate slows as you will see elevated coolant temperatures, even when there is minimal load. After heating things up a bit through normal load, it will take an extremely long time for the coolant levels to come down -- possibly not until you shut down and reboot hours later.  For you this would look something like 34C coolant at idle and it keeps slowly creeping up.  Then maybe mid 40s when under load and it stays there after you quit.  Your temps look good and if the coolant temp quickly drops over 2-3 minutes after load stops, you have a fully functional, healthy system.  

Oh, I haven't encountered the over/under speed condition. The pump's rpm has been steady 2200 rpm and the drop happen for like a second then it gets back up to 2200 rpm and there's no rpm increase. Only slight drops. It's like you're riding in a car in a steady road and you encountered a huge speed bump for a second, then you resume to ride in a steady road again.  You say that over 100 rpm +/- may consider it normal for the 1 second drops, then as I'm replying to this thread, the pump spead rpm drops to 1921 rpm for one second then it goes back to the steady 2200 rpm. So the reading from the hwinfo64 earlier was true. 

Despite all of this, after I exited out on Retroarch and right now the coolant temp is at 25.9c. It seems the one second drops doesn't seem to affect the coolant temp at the slightest. Still, would these 1 second rpm drops be considered normal for this now especially when it drop to like 1921rpm for one second? It seems the system looks functionally healthy, but the drops like that seem to worry me at the slightest. :X

I'll definitely keep an eye out for possible future cooler failures in the meantime and that means I'll look for a different cooler since my case is HAF 922 Cooler Master case and I'll decide whether a new AIO or a decent Air cooler would fit better, except for the G.Skill Ripjaws Z 8GBx4 1600mhz ram I had installed in my mobo.

Edited by RyougaLolakie
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Alright, this is what the drop looks like and today I saw an rpm drop to 1908 rpm. Most of the time its still steady at 2200 rpm. Though the max of coolant temp today was 30.1c and temps are still good. I dunno if that drop's gonna affect the pump's life that way, even for a 7 year old h80i. I'm ocd'ing too much about this. >< 

Thank you for the information about the overspeed/drops and more info about the pump's life and such, C-Attack! If the 1908rpm drop still counts as normal, then I guess I just have to accept this until the thing fails out after 7 long years. 🙂

Clipboard01clinkpumpcoolantpumprpmdrop.png

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I think it’s just a “hiccup” until it starts happening on a regular per minute basis. A pump is a high speed device and the sample rate is taken over 1 or 2 seconds before it is multiplied out. This makes a tiny variance look larger than it really is. Your pump would need to drop 1000 rpm for 5-10 seconds consecutively to impact your temperatures. So I don’t see any kind of performance issue on that end and your coolant temp is excellent, so I think you are still in good shape. 

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6 hours ago, c-attack said:

I think it’s just a “hiccup” until it starts happening on a regular per minute basis. A pump is a high speed device and the sample rate is taken over 1 or 2 seconds before it is multiplied out. This makes a tiny variance look larger than it really is. Your pump would need to drop 1000 rpm for 5-10 seconds consecutively to impact your temperatures. So I don’t see any kind of performance issue on that end and your coolant temp is excellent, so I think you are still in good shape. 

That's really good to know. 🙂 

I tested out CPU-Z stress test and seeing core 1 top it off at 72c (last time it was at steady 68c) while rest of the cores top off at 68, 66, and 60. The coolant temperature tops it off at 30.5c and pump speed's chugging at 2217rpm. To tell you the truth, when I got this pc built by Ironside Computers, the radiator fans themselves were hooked on the motherboard instead of being hooked on the cooler as the fans were at 2k rpm. I think its why the coolant temp maxes out at 30.5c during cpu-z cpu stress testing. I haven't bothered to switch the fans to the cpu cooler, but I was wondering if those fans at 2k speed affected the coolant temp that much.

After a couple of minutes later after I stopped the CPU-Z stress test, the coolant temp drops back to 26.6c

Edited by RyougaLolakie
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  • 11 months later...

I'm sorry for reviving this thread but I'm getting concerned about a similar, different problem. Last 2 weeks ago, I was attempted to upgrade the stock fans to noctua nf-f12 ippc 3000rpm fans but the results were AWFUL so I have to switch back to the stock fans to get the temps back to normal. With noctua temps increased like 10-15c tops.

Right now, Im currently testing the CPU test part on aida 64 for 20 mins. Pump speed was slowly down to 2200 rpm from 2209 rpm after boot. However, in bios, the pump speed is still around 2300. Not to mention, CPU temps average about 56c-62c. When I install the noctua fans, I had to lay the PC horizontal on a tile floor and I tried my best not to screw the pump in the process. This process literary made me feel regret about doing this in the first place. 

Sorry for uploading this from my phone.  Highest coolent temp right now is 30.7 without the side fan and bottom intake fans. The pump right now just hanging about 2202-2201rpm as I type this and I saw the pump went to 2198rpm 

Do you think the pump was slightly damage even though I took very careful steps while installing the fans on the radiator?

Edit: After I stop the test, the pump speed slowly climbs up as the coolant temp climbs down.

PXL_20230410_042233883.jpg

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Edited by RyougaLolakie
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It’s very unlikely the pump is damaged. Usually when a pump is having mechanical difficulties, it becomes very obvious in terms of noise and wild rpm fluctuations. You don’t seem to have either. 
 

However, it’s not too uncommon for some users to have issues with older AIO units after taking the radiator down it changing position. At this point in the life cycle there is a bit more air then there used to be and some may have anti-corrosive elements that have dropped out of solution and can create a blockage. Your coolant temp seems to be relatively normal, so it’s not likely there is a full block. You may have dome air trapped in the cooling fins if you are sitting at 50C in the bios. While the PC is running lift up or tilt one end so the inlet/outlet hoses rise up just above the cpu block/pump. This will help any air trapped in there to release out the cooling fins pump area where it causes problems. 
 

There is a small chance the block got knocked off its mount when moving things around. If you no longer have good contact between the cpu and cold plate you’ll see very erratic and high cpu temps as voltage loads and unloads. The cpu temp may jump instantly between 40 and 100C as you open and close programs. However, it’s far more likely things got shifted around as described above. 
 

You don’t want to use Industrial 3000 rpm fans on most Corsair coolers with internal fan controllers. Besides the extreme high speed most users will never utilize, the high current on the fan will blow out the fan controller if given the chance. Most units from the H80i to GTX/v2 to Pro era won’t be able to control them all when connected to the pump’s controller. 

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13 hours ago, c-attack said:

It’s very unlikely the pump is damaged. Usually when a pump is having mechanical difficulties, it becomes very obvious in terms of noise and wild rpm fluctuations. You don’t seem to have either. 
 

However, it’s not too uncommon for some users to have issues with older AIO units after taking the radiator down it changing position. At this point in the life cycle there is a bit more air then there used to be and some may have anti-corrosive elements that have dropped out of solution and can create a blockage. Your coolant temp seems to be relatively normal, so it’s not likely there is a full block. You may have dome air trapped in the cooling fins if you are sitting at 50C in the bios. While the PC is running lift up or tilt one end so the inlet/outlet hoses rise up just above the cpu block/pump. This will help any air trapped in there to release out the cooling fins pump area where it causes problems. 
 

There is a small chance the block got knocked off its mount when moving things around. If you no longer have good contact between the cpu and cold plate you’ll see very erratic and high cpu temps as voltage loads and unloads. The cpu temp may jump instantly between 40 and 100C as you open and close programs. However, it’s far more likely things got shifted around as described above. 
 

You don’t want to use Industrial 3000 rpm fans on most Corsair coolers with internal fan controllers. Besides the extreme high speed most users will never utilize, the high current on the fan will blow out the fan controller if given the chance. Most units from the H80i to GTX/v2 to Pro era won’t be able to control them all when connected to the pump’s controller. 

Last time I checked the bios, it was around 44c-45c, but in windows it was around 24c-27c on 4 cores at cold start-up. As I was starting up, it started on 2225 rpm, then it starts to drop to 2,215 rpm. So, I get that the pump speed is fixed in varience around 5%/10% (2000-2300), so this situation I'm currently having is normal, is it? Well, I'd guess I felt relieved that the pump isn't damaged, to say the least.

Dome air? Are those like air-bubbles that are formed inside the pump and gets trapped between the radiator and/or block? I may try your suggestion as I had the radiator/pump above the cpu block and radiator is placed on the back of my pc.

Last time I switched the fans, the block didn't get knocked off its mount and the temps are still good, not jumping erratically when loading up microsoft edge browser and steam. 

I'd already returned the industrial 3000 rpm fans and I can't decide which one will have similiar performance/temp ratio to stock fans, either noctua nf-a12x25, corsair ml120, or just grab another 2 stock fans I found on ebay. I don't mind about the noise, as I'd kinda like it as a good white noise for sleep. I may have to consider trying out the quiet fans so that I can tune the case fans down from full speed to silent. I don't want to make this an off-topic, so @c-attack, which fans would you prefer on the h80i for push-pull? 

 

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Ok, it seems like you are back to normal.  Those pump speed readings would be typical for a new pump, let alone one with a lot of years of use. Perhaps the pump cleared the partial block on its own. If the radiator is up top toward the rear, all you need to do is lift the front of the case up about three inches so the hose insertion points come up just a bit from the cpu block. Usually your hear the blockage clear with a change to a smooth, even tone. It doesn’t seem like you need to do this now, but just FYI for future events. 
 

You’ll be happy with either the ML120 or NF-A12. When the ML first came out, old “i” and GTX/v2 owners were very happy to get those ML on. I have no love for the old SP-L fans that came with those units. Loud and coarse in tone. The AF12 is very quiet at low to medium speeds compared to similar fans. It has more of a hybrid blade like the new Corsair AF that gives up some low end pressure for mid-range airflow and less noise. 

Edited by c-attack
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3 hours ago, c-attack said:

Ok, it seems like you are back to normal.  Those pump speed readings would be typical for a new pump, let alone one with a lot of years of use. Perhaps the pump cleared the partial block on its own. If the radiator is up top toward the rear, all you need to do is lift the front of the case up about three inches so the hose insertion points come up just a bit from the cpu block. Usually your hear the blockage clear with a change to a smooth, even tone. It doesn’t seem like you need to do this now, but just FYI for future events. 
 

You’ll be happy with either the ML120 or NF-A12. When the ML first came out, old “i” and GTX/v2 owners were very happy to get those ML on. I have no love for the old SP-L fans that came with those units. Loud and coarse in tone. The AF12 is very quiet at low to medium speeds compared to similar fans. It has more of a hybrid blade like the new Corsair AF that gives up some low end pressure for mid-range airflow and less noise. 

Last night I played a bit of TF2 and the pump slowly drops to 2204 rpm from 2213rpm and coolant temps raised up til 29. Temps are in the mid to high 40s to low 50s, even. When I'm done playing, the pump speed slowly rises back up to 2212 and coolant temp rises back down to 26c. I had to let the PC run overnight for white noise. Right now, pump speed hangs around 2213-2214 rpm and coolant temp hangs around 25.5c at idle. Highest pump speed rpm I've seen is 2218rpm. I still get some sudden drops like I had about almost a year ago but performance is still the same. Just to be clear on this and sorry if I ask the same question, is it normal for the pump to drop some rpm while the coolant temp rises abit during gaming load? 

I checked the specs of both fans and the ml had more static pressure than nf-a12x25's when putting into max speed, so is more static pressure more important nowadays compared to a decade ago when aios becoming mainstream? I may get 2 chromax black nf-a12x25 fans for aesthetics when I get the refund back. 

So far, thank you for your input @c-attack! 🙂

 

Edited by RyougaLolakie
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  • Solution

You won’t be able to notice a performance difference between the two fans. You can choose based on appearance. The A12 is going to be slightly quieter between 1000-1500 rpm because of the difference in blade design. Above 1500 everything is somewhat loud. 
 

Remember the pump speed you are shown is a running prediction based on the revolutions recorded in a 2 second interval. So if it records 73 revolutions in 2 sec, that’s 2190 rpm and 74 in 2 sec is 2220 rpm. These are small fractions of a very high speed device. No pump reads 2200-2200-2200-2200 every 2 seconds. That level of precision is not needed in a product like this nor does change the actual flow rate which is really what matters. A significant pump drop is several hundred rpm indicating the pump clearly slowed down, lost power, or is fighting against noticeable pressure (continued operation under expected speed). 

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8 hours ago, c-attack said:

You won’t be able to notice a performance difference between the two fans. You can choose based on appearance. The A12 is going to be slightly quieter between 1000-1500 rpm because of the difference in blade design. Above 1500 everything is somewhat loud. 
 

Remember the pump speed you are shown is a running prediction based on the revolutions recorded in a 2 second interval. So if it records 73 revolutions in 2 sec, that’s 2190 rpm and 74 in 2 sec is 2220 rpm. These are small fractions of a very high speed device. No pump reads 2200-2200-2200-2200 every 2 seconds. That level of precision is not needed in a product like this nor does change the actual flow rate which is really what matters. A significant pump drop is several hundred rpm indicating the pump clearly slowed down, lost power, or is fighting against noticeable pressure (continued operation under expected speed). 

Ohhhhhh....right. ^^; So that's why the pump's rpm drops or gain by 1, 50, or 100 rpm based on the revolutions recorded in a 2 second interval. That makes alot of sense. I can imagine icue app's graph look alot similiar of how it functions on newer aio coolers. 😮 My bad for not reading that part further.

Ah....good to know about the performance, cause I feel like I wasted money on nf-12 ippc 3000 fans and disappointed on the results of temperature performance. I'll definitely check it out the fan reviews on Youtube before I made the final decision on getting the 2 nf-a12x25 fans. 

So far, thank you very much for your insight on the matter, @c-attack! :)

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

So today, I turned on my PC and I heard air bubbles. So, I tilt the back of my PC then tilt the front of the PC very slowly and can hear it sloshing. Also I was on the bios temperature menu to see notice the change of the pump speed. I did see a brief 2600rpm then returns to the usual 2300rpm while trying to eliminate the air bubble. Temps didn't seem to change as it hangs around in the low 40s in bios. Note that the hoses were at the top of the pump to the back of the PC. That rad position was like this since I bought the PC in April/may of 2015 without problems until I replaced the stock fans. Would it be too late to change the position of the hoses to bottom if the air bubbles present?

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It’s normal for the pump to have a speed blip as you tilt and the bubbles release. Once they move out of the pump/block, they usually don’t come back unless the cpu is highest point in the loop. I would change any position unless you have another reason to do so. 

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38 minutes ago, c-attack said:

It’s normal for the pump to have a speed blip as you tilt and the bubbles release. Once they move out of the pump/block, they usually don’t come back unless the cpu is highest point in the loop. I would change any position unless you have another reason to do so. 

Here's the inside of my PC where the h80i is positioned.  

The air bubbles lasted about a few secs after I turned it on from cold boot. When I hear those bubbles again after I turn on the PC from like after an hour of being off, I tried tilting the back and front slowly again, and I don't hear any more of those bubbles.

I would love to change the hose position from top to bottom, but I'd afraid the hose would land on the gpu's back pcb, which means it won't have any clearance.

I'll turn on the PC again about another hour, without side case so I can hear if those air bubbles are back. The top CPU fans already giving a buzzing resonance so it's a bit hard to hear if it's actual bubbles slushing.

PXL_20230423_020700850.jpg

Edited by RyougaLolakie
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You are likely to run into GPU collision issues if you flip the radiator and the position you have it in now is the ideal one.  Part of the problem is the unit is aging and over time there is going to be some level of evaporation/permeation through the tubes.  More air in the loop, more chances to pass little bits through the pump and create the noise and speed blip.  It's a short loop so the bubbles may pass through several times before they settle up at the top of the radiator.  If lifting the back end up does not work, you can try rocking the case backwards (large rear panel side toward the desk).  That will also make the CPU the lowest point and may be more effective based on the hose position.  However, ultimately this is a somewhat typical for an aging AIO.

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5 hours ago, c-attack said:

You are likely to run into GPU collision issues if you flip the radiator and the position you have it in now is the ideal one.  Part of the problem is the unit is aging and over time there is going to be some level of evaporation/permeation through the tubes.  More air in the loop, more chances to pass little bits through the pump and create the noise and speed blip.  It's a short loop so the bubbles may pass through several times before they settle up at the top of the radiator.  If lifting the back end up does not work, you can try rocking the case backwards (large rear panel side toward the desk).  That will also make the CPU the lowest point and may be more effective based on the hose position.  However, ultimately this is a somewhat typical for an aging AIO.

True, it's the design of the mobo that makes a really short distance between the CPU and the gpu hence changing the tube position is impossible. And yeah, I think you're right that the tube position is at right now is the ideal one. My old x58 build had the tubes position at the bottom instead of the top as it had some clearance space between the CPU and the gpu. 

I did some google fu on those bubbles in closed loops and yeah, I guess it sucks that these bubbles happen in closed or custom loops. And I guess it's a matter of time before the cooler croaked itself to death. 😞

I'll try out your suggestion if I ever encounter another air bubble the next time I turn it on from cold boot but here's an update from last night til now.

After an another hour of PC turned off, I turned it on again without side case and I don't hear air bubbles. Decided to test aida64 CPU only test, temps stay only in the high 50s/low 60s with water temp of 29c/30c. Idle during start up started in 25c. After test, water temp quickly drops to 26c I decided to turn it off for the night.

When I woke up in the morning, I turned it on without side case again and no sign of air bubbles, just quiet and hum. I'll let it run throughout the day as I had some stuff to do. Right now, coolant temp is still as cool as a cucumber, idling at 26c and it's still quiet and hum. Temps were stable too, no overheating.

Last time the air bubble happened was yesterday afternoon. I did let the PC running for 2 days then I have to turn it off as I had to leave the house. When I came back home, I turned the PC on, I hear the air bubbles, but it only lasts for 3 seconds and it's quiet. It's like a trickle type of water sound for an air bubble.

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After one day of letting the system run, I'd turned off the PC for a few hours. Later then, I turned it on and there's that air bubble. I recorded an audio on my phone when it happened. I did tilted backwards and upwards to get rid of it. Pump speed blipped during the process and all I can hear was the impeller air bubble from the pump block on both sides. I did tried resting on the side and it made it bit worse until I put it back to it's original position and it settled down. 

Here's an audio recording of the air bubble:

https://recorder.google.com/share/f37df589-5e17-493f-9050-3e00a6af0fef

If unable to view said file, I'll put it up on my Dropbox. 

@c-attack, listen from 0:00 to 0:11 to hear an air bubble. Do you think it sounds like an air bubble or is it something else?

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So far, I tried tilting both front rear and back rear again and I can still hear the trickling bubble sloshing and I tilted back and forth of both rear sides and I don't hear it any more but having tilted the PC higher the pump makes the noise. So I tilted back down and it stops. Somehow it doesn't change the temps and I dunno if I should let the PC run or not.

I'd apologized for bumping this thread. 

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I don't hear much in the recording, but then these things can be difficult to capture.  If you are tilting the case and the pump tone changes, there could be a larger air bubble in the pump area.  Small ones tend to tick and pop.  You often get that after moving things around.  The larger bubble could be a result of the decrease in fluid over time and may be better described as an air pocket.  That can be harder to work out.  You'll have to make a judgment based on the noise.  If it's irritating, then you should probably take action.  If this is more curiosity, you can let it run.  Nothing in that recording suggests the pump is going fail tomorrow or the next day.  Mechanical issues are usually quite obvious.  

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