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H100i AIO fan curve help


SleepyNev
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Hi, I recently built a new pc. The specs are ryzen 7 5800x and rtx 3060ti. I bought a Corsair H100i AIO for the build and it's been working pretty well so far! I just have a few questions about it. So I built this at my home a few days ago and the coolant temps were around 33-37/38 from idle-gaming. I moved back into my dorm room and it's been around 35/36-38/39 idle-gaming. I just wanted to know if this was normal, I'm just worried since it's my first time making a pc and figuring out temps and stuff. Another question I have is I am messing around with the fan curves to see what is most optimal. I have the curve set to monitor and adjust around my coolant temp. My AIO is a 240mm radiator mounted on the top of the case so should I set the 2 fans to go off coolant temp and keep the 3 fans on the front of my pc case and the 1 fan in the back to go off something else or still coolant temp? Also wondering again if these coolant temps are fine, I'm trying to keep noise as low as I can while keeping temps good because the noise usually annoys me a lot as I have pretty sensitive ears.

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On 3/15/2022 at 11:13 PM, SleepyNev said:

the coolant temps were around 33-37/38 from idle-gaming. I moved back into my dorm room and it's been around 35/36-38/39 idle-gaming. I just wanted to know if this was normal

Fairly normal.  Most people will see an idle coolant temp of +4-7C over the ambient temperature, but there are several things that affect the baseline coolant temp.  The first and most significant is local environmental temperature.  If it is 20C in your room and the idle coolant is 27C, then you will see coolant of 32C if the room temp goes up to 25C.  Ambient temp is the lowest possible coolant temp and coolant temp is the lowest possible CPU temp with 0v on the Vcore.  More specifically it is the case internal temperature that determines that lowest possible level and so you will also see small temp shifts based on where you place the radiator in the case.  Top exhaust is going to warmer than front intake, but then there are other non-related factors for placing rads in whatever position you choose.  GPU waste heat is the largest contributor to interior case temp in most builds.  That therefore affects the coolant temp as well.  You will see coolant temp go up dramatically during gaming, even though CPU wattage may be moderate or lower. Some CPUs will add a bit more watts to the cooling system based on design, your BIOS settings, and Windows power levels, not to mention the obvious stuff like what you are doing on the desktop.  Small degree shifts here or there, but part of the overall value.  Some times the room itself matters or where you have placed the case.  Dump in in a corner and it will slowly heat up the surrounding space.  Unless things have changed quite a bit in the college world, dorm rooms are still small, cramped, will hard walls and limited ventilation.  It's not surprising baseline temps went up.  

 

So for fan curve control I have two suggestions.  First, make a editable copy of the presets so you can see and alter behavior.  Easy to do.  Cooling tab and + to create a new custom curve.  Graph appears below.  Select any of the shape tools in the lower corner that correspond to each of the three presets (Quiet/Balanced/Extreme).  Make sure you change the sensor choice to H100i Temp and then change the fans above to run the new 'custom 1' curve.  If you can't lower coolant below 36C at any fan speed, then there is no reason to blast them at idle.  You can shift the baseline temp up to your normal 35-37C and then extend the curve from there.  It's next to impossible to make a universal preset for this since we all have such varying conditions.  In Winter my coolant temp would never make it to the 31C baseline in the presets even after hours of load, yet that's close to the mark for idle on hot Summer night.  

 

Second, leave the top radiator fans on the custom curve, then you can make a choice for rear exhaust.  1) Copy the custom curve (copy function in drop down box) and rename it.  Make the curve a bit more aggressive and then assign it to the rear exhaust fan alone.  This should cause it to trigger when under GPU load but without having to make the radiator fans more aggressive.  You'd prefer the waste heat went out the back and not through the radiator.  Option 2 is make a custom curve and use GPU temp or motherboard temp as the control variable.  This is likely an easier value for most people to work with, but be aware this will not work when CUE is not running.  It requires the software to fetch the temp data from the other components.  For that reason, option 1 may be better or it can be done by adding a 10K thermistor probe to the temp slot on the Commander Core to take exhaust air readings.  Water temp will work too in most circumstances.  

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37 minutes ago, c-attack said:

Fairly normal.  Most people will see an idle coolant temp of +4-7C over the ambient temperature, but there are several things that affect the baseline coolant temp.  The first and most significant is local environmental temperature.  If it is 20C in your room and the idle coolant is 27C, then you will see coolant of 32C if the room temp goes up to 25C.  Ambient temp is the lowest possible coolant temp and coolant temp is the lowest possible CPU temp with 0v on the Vcore.  More specifically it is the case internal temperature that determines that lowest possible level and so you will also see small temp shifts based on where you place the radiator in the case.  Top exhaust is going to warmer than front intake, but then there are other non-related factors for placing rads in whatever position you choose.  GPU waste heat is the largest contributor to interior case temp in most builds.  That therefore affects the coolant temp as well.  You will see coolant temp go up dramatically during gaming, even though CPU wattage may be moderate or lower. Some CPUs will add a bit more watts to the cooling system based on design, your BIOS settings, and Windows power levels, not to mention the obvious stuff like what you are doing on the desktop.  Small degree shifts here or there, but part of the overall value.  Some times the room itself matters or where you have placed the case.  Dump in in a corner and it will slowly heat up the surrounding space.  Unless things have changed quite a bit in the college world, dorm rooms are still small, cramped, will hard walls and limited ventilation.  It's not surprising baseline temps went up.  

 

So for fan curve control I have two suggestions.  First, make a editable copy of the presets so you can see and alter behavior.  Easy to do.  Cooling tab and + to create a new custom curve.  Graph appears below.  Select any of the shape tools in the lower corner that correspond to each of the three presets (Quiet/Balanced/Extreme).  Make sure you change the sensor choice to H100i Temp and then change the fans above to run the new 'custom 1' curve.  If you can't lower coolant below 36C at any fan speed, then there is no reason to blast them at idle.  You can shift the baseline temp up to your normal 35-37C and then extend the curve from there.  It's next to impossible to make a universal preset for this since we all have such varying conditions.  In Winter my coolant temp would never make it to the 31C baseline in the presets even after hours of load, yet that's close to the mark for idle on hot Summer night.  

 

Second, leave the top radiator fans on the custom curve, then you can make a choice for rear exhaust.  1) Copy the custom curve (copy function in drop down box) and rename it.  Make the curve a bit more aggressive and then assign it to the rear exhaust fan alone.  This should cause it to trigger when under GPU load but without having to make the radiator fans more aggressive.  You'd prefer the waste heat went out the back and not through the radiator.  Option 2 is make a custom curve and use GPU temp or motherboard temp as the control variable.  This is likely an easier value for most people to work with, but be aware this will not work when CUE is not running.  It requires the software to fetch the temp data from the other components.  For that reason, option 1 may be better or it can be done by adding a 10K thermistor probe to the temp slot on the Commander Core to take exhaust air readings.  Water temp will work too in most circumstances.  

Hi, thanks for the help. I'll give the suggestions you listed out a try, hopefully it helps me out. I was gaming for a few hours yesterday and I found that around 50% fan speed which I consider the most tolerable during gaming the temps on the coolant would hover steadily around 40-40.50. Should I be worried if the temps ever hit 40C? I'm still new to pc's as a whole and AIO's so not sure what the normal coolant temp for an aio should be. I changed the fan curve to quiet as well while gaming which jumped the rpm considerably, only difference it made was bringing the coolant temp to to around 39-40 still. So for now I'll take your advice and leave the curve at around 40-40.50 at 50% speed since there's no point in blasting the fans if they won't change it much.

So for my 2 questions:

1: should I change my 3 fans in the front of the case to match the "custom curve 1" that the radiator fans currently follow or should I set another fan curve for them?

2: At what coolant temp should I be worried. What I mean is I've heard the AIO hitting 40C is bad and you want to keep it 2-3C below that ideally. My AIO in my dorm room currently hits that coolant temp while gaming (39-40.50 C)

currently not sure what baseline I should use for measuring what a good coolant temp is.

Once again, thanks for the help. Please bear with me since I'm new to this and AIO's especially, so some of my questions might seem dumb. I just want the best noise to cooling ratio possible since it would be a pain for me while working to have loud fans under idle and my roommate as well would probably be annoyed by loud fans.

Also below I have included a picture of my where I have my pc placed, it's usually further into the corner if you have any suggestions or just wanted to see where I have it placed currently.

 

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7 minutes ago, SleepyNev said:

Should I be worried if the temps ever hit 40C?

No.  The 40C=100% fan line comes from an expected baseline of normal room temp or approximately 23C.  Thus 40C represents a +17C gain and that is pretty sizeable.  Regardless of baseline temp, 40C coolant is where some users may start to run up against CPU temp limits.  Your CPU has a 'coolant to CPU temp' differential that is based on its physical properties and voltage settings.  The typical light overclock on any CPU in the last 10 years (or most recent boards with auto-overclocking in the BIOS) will give you a +50C CPU to Coolant differential.  So if your coolant is 40C and your max out the CPU, then the CPU should be at 90C in that state.  This is a bigger issue for people doing heavy CPU professional loads, mining, etc.  For gaming, you are not going to sustain any type of maximal CPU load and so you shouldn't see those kind of peak temps. 

 

As far as the AIO is concerned, 50C is where you need to be concerned.  Aside from a further +10C to component temps, if you are over 50C on a regular basis some changes need to be made.  Most people need a combination of bad factors to reach that level.  Most manufacturers list 60C as their hardware limit.  No AIO should ever hit 60C and if it does you need to stop until you know why.  

 

You are going to have limited options on your room control and placement.  No getting around those issues.  Common sense stuff applies here.  If you slide the case under a closed desk, it will trap the heat around it.  On the desk or a small table is about the best you can do.  You're not going to have a lot of room temp control either.  Just remember +1C to coolant = +1 to CPU, so there is no reason to sweat the small changes.  They won't matter for your use.  Fan noise is something else and that should be tolerable.  Nothing in your system fails or produces less performance because you are at 42C vs 39C.  

 

Manual fan control is another option for hot spaces.  You set it to a tolerable speed before gaming and leave it.  Drop it back to the custom curve when done.  

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31 minutes ago, c-attack said:

No.  The 40C=100% fan line comes from an expected baseline of normal room temp or approximately 23C.  Thus 40C represents a +17C gain and that is pretty sizeable.  Regardless of baseline temp, 40C coolant is where some users may start to run up against CPU temp limits.  Your CPU has a 'coolant to CPU temp' differential that is based on its physical properties and voltage settings.  The typical light overclock on any CPU in the last 10 years (or most recent boards with auto-overclocking in the BIOS) will give you a +50C CPU to Coolant differential.  So if your coolant is 40C and your max out the CPU, then the CPU should be at 90C in that state.  This is a bigger issue for people doing heavy CPU professional loads, mining, etc.  For gaming, you are not going to sustain any type of maximal CPU load and so you shouldn't see those kind of peak temps. 

 

As far as the AIO is concerned, 50C is where you need to be concerned.  Aside from a further +10C to component temps, if you are over 50C on a regular basis some changes need to be made.  Most people need a combination of bad factors to reach that level.  Most manufacturers list 60C as their hardware limit.  No AIO should ever hit 60C and if it does you need to stop until you know why.  

 

You are going to have limited options on your room control and placement.  No getting around those issues.  Common sense stuff applies here.  If you slide the case under a closed desk, it will trap the heat around it.  On the desk or a small table is about the best you can do.  You're not going to have a lot of room temp control either.  Just remember +1C to coolant = +1 to CPU, so there is no reason to sweat the small changes.  They won't matter for your use.  Fan noise is something else and that should be tolerable.  Nothing in your system fails or produces less performance because you are at 42C vs 39C.  

 

Manual fan control is another option for hot spaces.  You set it to a tolerable speed before gaming and leave it.  Drop it back to the custom curve when done.  

Hi, thanks for the fast response and the help. I understand a lot more clearly now. I'll take the suggestions you listed in your 2 replies above and apply them to my system. Thanks again for the help!

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