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Corsair Hydro-x series watercooling high-temps on Ryzen 9 5900X cpu when added GPU to loop


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Hi all

  I would like your advice regarding high-temperatures on this issue I am facing. I have been using a Corsair Hydro-X custom water-loop solution for cooling my Ryzen 9 5900X cpu since Christmas 2021. It was working fine with idle temps between 47 and 51 degrees. Yesterday, I added my 3090 GPU to the waterloop with a waterblock. Since then and when I am using my GPU for mining my cpu can reach up to 80C even when idle (12% utilization). I only have a single 360mm Corsair radiator. Do you think I need a second one?

Regards,

George

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ouch... yes you need at least a second one.

Rule of thumb, you can count  a maximum of about 300W worth of TDP per 360mm radiator. It was fine for a single CPU, but it's not enough for the GPU alone.

At least two 360 will get you up and running. if your case can accomodate more radiators, you will be able to slow down your fans, by having more cooling headroom.

In the meantime, keep an eye at your water temperature. Watercooling gear is given for a max temp of 60°C but you want to stay well below that.

Maybe create a more agressive fan curve based off water temp to make the fans work harder and try to lower the GPU power limit until you install the second radiator.

 

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Your data suggests a load coolant delta of +30C. That’s a bit high even for a theoretical 500W for mining. You absolutely need a second radiator to help with the 350-400W from the 3090, but as suggested above there seems to be another factor. 

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You need as much radiator as you can stuff into that case. The 3090 will put off a TON of heat and the direct-die contact puts that heat straight into the loop. While that is exactly what you want to happen, you need to deal with it too and get that heat out of the loop.

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Thank you all for the information. The thing is that I have ample space for a second radiator but I already have 14mm fans there. Will these fit on a 360mm radiator?

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14mm or 14cm? 😛

thin fans, forget it, they don't have enough static pressure.

14cm fans won't fit a 360 ^^ a 280mm radiator is very close in surface area to a 360 so you could use that and keep 140mm fans for it.

 

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That would be best. There are converters for 140->120, but it’s usually inefficient. You be ignoring a large portion of the radiator surface area. 
 

Still a bit concerned about the +30C coolant rise when on a single radiator, although keeping the fans pinned down under 1000 rpm would explain it. 

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Which case do you have? If you have 3x 140mm fans, do you have room for a 420mm radiator?

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Just some status update. I have ordered another radiator 420mm and will mount the fans on it. The next question is will my PUMP have enough pressure for proper liquid flow with the 360mm and 420mm radiator? I am using Thermaltake 140mm fans but I don't think that would cause a problem. I can control their speed via the Thermaltake TT RGB plus instead of iCue.

  Currently, I have the fans on the 360mm running at 1700rpm and the liquid temp ranges from 34 to 36C when idle (desktop usage). During gaming it can go over 40C. So I clearly need the second radiator.

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3 hours ago, divined2004 said:

Currently, I have the fans on the 360mm running at 1700rpm and the liquid temp ranges from 34 to 36C when idle (desktop usage). During gaming it can go over 40C

Ok, that’s more in the expected range, so no reason to suspect deeper lying problems. 
 

Flow rate is dependent on the pump power (generally the same across models of the same type) and the total resistance in the loop (highly variable and unique). CPU blocks are often the most restrictive but the XC7 is average in that regard. Radiators vary so it will depend on the exact model, but even in a worst case scenario every D5 pump can handle 2 radiators, cpu + gpu blocks, and some twists as turns. It’s only when you start to combine very restrictive blocks and moderately restrictive radiators that you might see some performance decline.
 

You can get some idea if flow rate is an issue by setting up a cpu or gpu desktop stress test (cpu-Z or the OC test in Afterburner are good for this) and then change the pump speed from your normal “medium speed” up to 4500-4800. An 1-2C improvement at the cpu/gpu temp would be normal. If you drop 5C+, then water is lingering in the block a bit too long. 

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.. and water flow doesn't play a big role at all in cooling performance.. only if it's way too low will it have a drastic impact.

Just to give an example, from the tests i've done on my loop, if the flow falls below 70 - 80 L/h the 3090 temp starts to jump up suddenly.

above those flows, the temperature drops very marginally. 100 - 120 L/h being a good all round value for gaming and idle alike.

With 3 slim radiators CPU, GPU and GPU active backplate, that flow was attained around 50-60% PWM on a D5. And the steep temperature rise was like under 30% PWM.

So the XD5 should be more than capable of pushing water without breaking a sweat on your rig.

 

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Thank you all for your responses. Glad to know that the XD5 is capable of handling this.

I have one more question, if you might. The fact is that I run my PC 24/7 and I am using Corsair soft-tubes for the plumbing. What is the risk that the soft-tubing might fail resulting in a catastrophic failure, assuming normal liquid temperatures?

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As low as it can possibly be.  Soft tubing is less human error prone than hard.  Materials failure is near impossible absent some extraordinary circumstances.  I just discovered I failed to re-tighten one of my compression rings on one build.  It ran that way for a month, most often at high pump speed.  Not a dribble.  The biggest risk of leaking is human error when you try to take shortcuts.  Aside from that, you don't see problems like this.  If you are still a bit concerned, you can try to route tubes away from expensive areas.  I don't do passes over the PSU or the RAM if I can help it.  Going across the GPU is inevitable, but not a problem with a solid backplate.  

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Thank you for your reply. That is my opinion as well. Soft-tuning seems to be solid and much easier to set up as opposed to hard-tubing. Not to mention that I am not that adept with custom mechanical work. I use standard Corsair soft-tubes, they should be good enough.

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  • 2 months later...

Hi all

 

I return to this topic because there has been a change in my system.

  Thing is, that my 3090 developed a problem and I have disconnected it from power but left it in the water loop, until I can find some time to make adjustments. Currently, I am only cooling the CPU with the custom water loop (two 360mm radiators but only one with Corsair fans (intake), the second has Thermaltake 14mm outake fans) . Idle liquid temperature is 34C  but it can reach up to 54C when gaming  (3080 GPU). Is this normal? I was expecting lower temps with only the CPU loading the water loop.

This is my custom curve:

image.thumb.png.814edb1779d52176b54be62d1c9227c7.png

 

I also attach a screenshot of my fan settings.

 

image.png.7bffadc8387f01fa16f4f836cff2d480.png

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IMPORTANT UPDATE:

After doing some adjustments to my system fans, I now saw a considerable improvement in my temperature delta when the CPU is under load. Now it only fluctuates between 34C and 36C, which is much more acceptable. The Ryzen 5900X CPU still reached a peak of 81C at times when running the 3DS Max CPU test, but I suppose that is to be expected.

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with an aircooled GPU in the case, it's doom for your CPU loop if you have fans set as exhaust on rads.

The waste heat from the aircooled GPU will heat up the water considerably. I had to go through the same thing when waiting for the 3090 blocks, and the CPU only loop was way hotter than when the GPU was finally added to it.

There's not much you can do besides maybe slowing down the exhaust fans that are mounted to rads, and try to use the back exhaust at higher speed for example to have as little hot air as possible on the radiators, and exhaust it cleanly out of the case.

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I am not sure I understand.  The GPU is not working, but still plumbed in.  While doing something, you saw a +20C increase in coolant temp from the CPU alone???  That is an extraordinary amount in system with moving liquid.  Maybe with fans off.  Is it possible the pump slowed way down (sub 1500 rpm) while you were maximally loading the CPU?  That could cause the coolant to linger in the CPU block for too long and take way too much heat.  

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Yes, exactly, the GPU is not working since yesterday but still plumbed in. I will remove it probably next weekend when I have time.

It seems that this was some sort of outlier and I can see that the coolant temperature is at 30.6C while idle after fiddling with the fans settings, Need to do more tests but I think that I am more or less good now.

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Is the liquid temp sensor in the XD5-reservoir?  I’ve seen momentary abnormal readings from inline sensors but it would be unusual in the reservoir which is generally not subject to momentary fluctuations. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry for the late reply.

 

  The liquid temp sensor is set to Commander Pro Temp. All my FANS are dependent on the Custom curve I have set. However, although the XD5 pump is currently running at 4.700 RPM I can barely see any flow in my soft-tubing. It would be nice if I had a liquid flow gauge.

In short I fear there is eventually something wrong with my RIG since I have an idle liquid temp of almost 37C.

image.thumb.png.b235ccee3eece151aa64167598ec461c.png

When I initially setup the water loop, I had not connected the XD5 temp sensor to the Commander Pro and I could see the PUMP having the liquid flow at full speed. However, is this normal to have such a low liquid flow under normal operating conditions (pin 6 of Commander Pro connected to XD5 temp sesonr)?

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Questions onslaught : what's the temperature in the room? the GPU and CPU are very close to 0% usage? no bugged program loading the system without you knowing?

With the pump at almost full speed you have lots of flow unless you're very unlucky and you have bent or twisted thin wall soft tubing collapsing at the pump inlet. Maybe have a look if it's alright there. check all your bends to make sure none kinked

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Some more info about my config. I use two 360mm radiator. One is vertically mounted with 3x Corsair 12mm intake fans and the other one is horizontally placed on the bottom of my case and uses 3x Thermaltake 14mm outake fans.

I am not sure if I would have better results if the Thermaltake fans were also intake. If so I would need to invert another set of fans to outtake. Would you recommend so?

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