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Hi All hope to get some recommendation on my loop. Im adding my Evga 3080 ti ftw3 with a water block finally and want to see what everyone thought in my layout for everything fans and waterblock if I should change anything. So I have the following Hardware. The fans are setup as the following 3 in front pulling air in, 3 on side with 360 rad pulling air thru, 3 Top mount pushing air thru 360 rad, 1 Exhaust. Should I keep this layout with adding the 3080 ti to the loop?

Corsair 5000x RGB

Corsair Hydro Kit 

2 Corsair 360 Rads One Top mounted and the other Side Mounted

AMD 5800x Cpu With Corsair water block

1tb Samsung 980pro with corsair ssd waterblock

10 Corsair 120mm QL Fans

EVGA RTX 3080 ti FTW3 

EKWB Waterblock that cooling both sides of the card. Probley didnt need to cool the backplate but go big right!

2 Commander Pro XT to control fans and rgb

Right Now the loop goes like this Pump out to the rad on the side comes out goes up to the cpu, out cpu to m.2 out to the top rad and back to the pump. My thought and not sure if it makes a difference but thinking coming out of the first rad going to the 3080 ti and then to cpu then the m.2 cooler and then to the top rad and back to pump/res. 

Water temp 29c

Exhaust temp 30.4c

Center of case between the 3080 stand up and the mother board 28.9c

Package temp at idel 32-40

All fans set to quite right now

Pump set to Pump profile   

3088 ti fan cooled at the moment is 33.72

Thoughts? Anything I should change, move ect. Hope I made sense lol

 

Thanks,

 

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You are about to add 300-400W to the loop, so things are going to change quite a bit.  There are a couple of different options for radiator layout.  Either you need 2 radiators intake (front + side/rear MB wall) or you need two exhaust (MB wall + top).  The difference in terms of performance is likely small with -1 or 2C coolant temp traded for an increase in case ambient temp that is passed on to air cooled components like RAM, chipsets, etc.  However, I am wondering about the physical capacity to stick a radiator on the side and the front.  Where those two meet may be very tight and additionally add some very short runs between pump/res and the two radiators.  That can be difficult.  I would lean toward top + side wall exhaust.  That gives you a bit more room to maneuver and also likely blows the heat away from you.  

 

Loop order doesn't really matter too much.  You might pick up 1-2C in coolant temp as it passes through CPU or GPU, so putting one directly after the other adds 1-2C to the second component.  However, if you are within 1-2C of your threshold, you likely are in trouble anyway.  With exhausting radiators I tend to favor going to both CPU and GPU, then directly to the top radiator.  The one above the motherboard is going to have warmer intake air (from MB and general waste heat) and so you can get the most out of it my running the warmest coolant through it first.  This is min/maxing to be sure, but water cooling improvements are usually measure in terms of 1 degree here and another fraction from something else.  The one component that you might consider putting upstream is the m.2 drive.  It adds little heat to coolant stream, but it is temperature affected.  Putting it directly after CPU and GPU would boost its minimum temp by potentially 2-4C.  That probably does not impact it's performance, but then why water cool it if you are not trying to optimize its temperature.  That is one component I would put before the big heat pick up from the CPU+GPU.  

 

In the end, you have to physically run the tubes from one point to the next.  Being forced into some twisted mess of a pathway likely is more upsetting than increasing your components temps by 1C.  Whatever you decide, make sure it is pleasing, reasonable, and accessible.  Getting yourself into a set-up that is overly difficult to access can be regrettable.  

Edited by c-attack
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On 11/2/2021 at 7:36 AM, c-attack said:

You are about to add 300-400W to the loop, so things are going to change quite a bit.  There are a couple of different options for radiator layout.  Either you need 2 radiators intake (front + side/rear MB wall) or you need two exhaust (MB wall + top).  The difference in terms of performance is likely small with -1 or 2C coolant temp traded for an increase in case ambient temp that is passed on to air cooled components like RAM, chipsets, etc.  However, I am wondering about the physical capacity to stick a radiator on the side and the front.  Where those two meet may be very tight and additionally add some very short runs between pump/res and the two radiators.  That can be difficult.  I would lean toward top + side wall exhaust.  That gives you a bit more room to maneuver and also likely blows the heat away from you.  

 

Loop order doesn't really matter too much.  You might pick up 1-2C in coolant temp as it passes through CPU or GPU, so putting one directly after the other adds 1-2C to the second component.  However, if you are within 1-2C of your threshold, you likely are in trouble anyway.  With exhausting radiators I tend to favor going to both CPU and GPU, then directly to the top radiator.  The one above the motherboard is going to have warmer intake air (from MB and general waste heat) and so you can get the most out of it my running the warmest coolant through it first.  This is min/maxing to be sure, but water cooling improvements are usually measure in terms of 1 degree here and another fraction from something else.  The one component that you might consider putting upstream is the m.2 drive.  It adds little heat to coolant stream, but it is temperature affected.  Putting it directly after CPU and GPU would boost its minimum temp by potentially 2-4C.  That probably does not impact it's performance, but then why water cool it if you are not trying to optimize its temperature.  That is one component I would put before the big heat pick up from the CPU+GPU.  

 

In the end, you have to physically run the tubes from one point to the next.  Being forced into some twisted mess of a pathway likely is more upsetting than increasing your components temps by 1C.  Whatever you decide, make sure it is pleasing, reasonable, and accessible.  Getting yourself into a set-up that is overly difficult to access can be regrettable.  

So you saying change the fans on the side rad to exhaust that is pretty easy to do. what about the rear fans should that still exhaust? I have the 3 intaking on the front right now. For the order your saying have from the pump to the m.2 first, then cpu,gpu top rad. side rad and the pump if I read that right? None if these bends are going to be fun to do but I'm learning.

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On 11/2/2021 at 2:36 PM, c-attack said:

Loop order doesn't really matter too much. 

That's what you can take out of it😉

Do what's easiest in terms of tube routing. As long as you have enough water flow, the temperatures will be fairly close between waterblocks.

The GPU is the component that is usually the most sensitive to temperature (boosting higher as temperature decreases, and vice versa). the M.2 doesn't need watercooling so you can connect it wherever it fits, and the CPU will be fine as long as it's below its throttling temperature.

 

Typically in a traditional style case like the 5000 you'll have the pump at the bottom, feeding water to the waterblocks from bottom to top, then return through the rads to the reservoir. That's the usual layout, but being custom loop, you can customize it any way you like.

I see you're going to use the active backplate on the GPU, if you haven't pmounted it yet, take your time 😛 EK released a video showing how to install it, maybe watch it and don't rush that part. It can be pretty fiddly to install the manifold.

As for temps, it will help a little, but it mostly benefits 3090s. And hey, it looks cool 🙂

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8 hours ago, mikea213 said:

So you saying change the fans on the side rad to exhaust that is pretty easy to do. what about the rear fans should that still exhaust? I have the 3 intaking on the front right now.

You don't want to dump exhaust from one radiator into the other.  It nullifies the cooling effect on the one radiator, which at that point you might as well just run 1.  Running top and side wall radiators as exhaust will dump the waste heat directly out.  The front intakes supply most of the air.  I would probably leave the rear slot open with no fan.  The top fan will draw in air from the back.  If you prefer a fan there, you can run it as exhaust to maybe pull some MB component heat away from the the top, but with no more GPU dumping heat into the center it doesn't need to work very hard.  

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On 11/4/2021 at 11:26 AM, c-attack said:

You don't want to dump exhaust from one radiator into the other.  It nullifies the cooling effect on the one radiator, which at that point you might as well just run 1.  Running top and side wall radiators as exhaust will dump the waste heat directly out.  The front intakes supply most of the air.  I would probably leave the rear slot open with no fan.  The top fan will draw in air from the back.  If you prefer a fan there, you can run it as exhaust to maybe pull some MB component heat away from the the top, but with no more GPU dumping heat into the center it doesn't need to work very hard.  

Awesome thank you for the help I really appreciate it. I didnt think about the heat dump makes a lot of sense

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On 11/4/2021 at 5:50 AM, LeDoyen said:

That's what you can take out of it😉

Do what's easiest in terms of tube routing. As long as you have enough water flow, the temperatures will be fairly close between waterblocks.

The GPU is the component that is usually the most sensitive to temperature (boosting higher as temperature decreases, and vice versa). the M.2 doesn't need watercooling so you can connect it wherever it fits, and the CPU will be fine as long as it's below its throttling temperature.

 

Typically in a traditional style case like the 5000 you'll have the pump at the bottom, feeding water to the waterblocks from bottom to top, then return through the rads to the reservoir. That's the usual layout, but being custom loop, you can customize it any way you like.

I see you're going to use the active backplate on the GPU, if you haven't pmounted it yet, take your time 😛 EK released a video showing how to install it, maybe watch it and don't rush that part. It can be pretty fiddly to install the manifold.

As for temps, it will help a little, but it mostly benefits 3090s. And hey, it looks cool 🙂

I have thought about removing the m.2 water block as I'm not sure how much it really helps and you really don't see it back there with the video card and it makes the run a little more difficult to run those tight bends kick my but.

I haven't mounted it yet as the one they sent wasn't correct so Im back to the wait game. I'll have to go and see about that video on it thanks for the info. On temps I didnt think it would help alot but with you it looks cool.

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