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h115i overheating Ryzen 7 1700x - no cooldown - shuts down at 90°


W0nderW0lf
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Hello everyone,

I recently cleaned up my PC from all dust, rebuild it professinally with better cable management etc.

Now after all my PC boots up, but it doesnt take long after logging in to windows that it's slower than before. Wen I open up Corsair Link only, I see that the CPU Package reaches 75°. As soon as I open up the browser the CPU jumps to 80°+ until it reaches 90° and shuts itself down.

I checked the thermal paste multiple times. It's thin layered and has contact with the pump. Fans are spinning and the pump is vibrating slightly in my hand. The upper pipe that leads to the fans is warm and the pipe below is cold. Seems ok for me.. I checked the screws and the backplate multiple times. It's really tight screwed. No chance that it has no contact. I have even made extra pressure on the pump to the CPU by pressing it down with my hand while its running. It wont cool down. Only for once I managed to get it to 50°, but only for a short time.

Any idea what could be wrong?

I can set pump and fans to 100% and it wont cool it down... so frustrating..

 

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14 hours ago, W0nderW0lf said:

The upper pipe that leads to the fans is warm and the pipe below is cold.

Unfortunately this is a strong warning sign you have a blocked flow path inside the cooler. Typical temperature drop after passing through the radiator is 0-1.5C or below touch sensitivity. The tubes should be indistinguishable. In this case the cpu is heating the stagnate water in the block and it’s naturally radiating in both direction. In Link it likely shows the H115i temp as 60C+ or a good 20C past normal operating range. That is coolant temp and the minimum possible cpu temp. The trapped warm liquid is keeping the cpu at elevated temperature. 
 

You can try tipping the case (inlet/outlet higher than the block) while it’s running. Just maybe whatever is blocking things will let go. However, this is how a no-maintenance AIO eventually comes to an end. If you are still in the 5 year warranty contact Corsair or start looking at replacements. Even if the tipping solves it, that is likely to be a temporary solution. 

Edited by c-attack
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Thanks m8... After a little bit of try and error, I came to the conclusion that there must be air bubbles inside the pump. I heard quietly water bubling. seems like I have to service it. I dont know if I had a 5yr warranty, but I dont think so.

This AIO Cooler was builtin since maybe 2016 or 17 and have not been unmounted until yesterday. maybe because of my cleanup the air went up to the pump and caused this.

I gonna open this up and try to pump the air out.

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often it's gunk accumulating in the pump block or in the tubes. everything works fine until you move the AIO. Then after the startup, all the dislodged particles clog the pump and you have the situation you are experiencing.

refilling wouldn't help much. You'd have to take the pump apart entirely, clean the coldplate's fins, drain the circuit, purge it, put the pump back together, refill with new coolant.. and maybe it would work if it's not leaking and the pump isn't damaged.

I believe all corsair AIOs have a 5 year warranty, so if it's still within 5 years of purchase, you could get in touch with Corsair support, and maybe get a replacement.

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Depends. Not always there is gunk stuff inside. I life the no waste policy. As soon as Corsair would take the old one they would throw it on the garbage. Everything is serviceable. It would be my first time, but its not impossible. 🙂 Thats why they all got screws on their heatplates.

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If you are willing to give it a go i imagine it would void the warranty, if it's still valid that is.

Otherwise i'm totally with you on that 🙂 i am almost certain you'll find that green goo clogging the fins but nothing patience and elbow grease can't solve.

Dead for dead it's worth trying, and why not taking pictures too. me is curious about a "how to revive a dead clogged AIO"

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If it’s just bubbles you can probably fix this with the case tilt. Get the inlet and outlet slightly above the block. If you have a massive case, this can be more problematic. 

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Well... Today the new liquid arrived so I wanted to start to dismantle the pump and then I realised that these screws are the most cheapest Corsair could use. None of my small screwdriver fitted so well that I could screw them out without damaging the heads. So this means I wont be able to put everything back together 😞

I wrote the support a couple of minutes ago. I hope I can get replacement screws somewhere. Would be a shame if it would get unusable because of missing screws for the copper plate :/

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Unfortunately that is part of the design. The cold plate screws are extremely difficult to manage. This is one of several reasons most people should avoid dismantling. The refill can be difficult to avoid excess air in the system. 

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So it seems that this was my last AIO I bought from corsair.

I got a reply from support, telling me that their AIO Systems are "Maintenance-Free" and doesn't require service.. But sending me 2 links about how to shake your AIO cooler in different directions and how to mount it correctly.

Very unfortunate..

I just wanted these screws...

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giving out parts to repair them would be like shooting themselves in the foot, business-wise

If you want something that you can maintain, repair, with easy to find parts, well that's what custom loop is for.

The first purchase can be a bit steep, but after that, as you upgrade your PC you only have water blocks to change, and for the CPU, depending on the good will of Intel and AMD, you can reuse the same block on several generations.

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Well, it seems that everything is repairable and serviceable with enough patience.. I went to my local hardware store which has a good selection. In germany it's called "hornbach". I found an almost identical screw. with 95% same size. It's just a bit sharper and the head is like 0,1 mm bigger, but thats easy to fix with the right tools such as a file. It seems to have a better quality and it fits bigger screwdrivers for future services 😄

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you could still lap the whole coldplate once the screws are in place, sticking a sheet of very fine sandpaper to a flat surface, and get the screws level with the rest.. or file the screwheads yes 🙂

 

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I just checked. The Corsair H115i does have a 5 year warranty.

I just upgraded my Ryzen 1700X to a Ryzen 3700X a few days ago. My Corsair H60 is still working fine after 4-1/2 years. My idle temp is 40-45C.

I also have a 9 year old Corsair H60 in another computer. It is also still working OK.

When either of them fails I am just going to replace them with another cooler. For what they cost it is not worth trying to fix them. Besides that is why Corsair has these AIO coolers. They are not meant to be worked on.

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