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Is Hydro X performing as it should?


Biege_Beast
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Hi all,

I'm completely new to water cooling, and new to the forum, so please be gentle.

I recently installed a Hydro X XH305i kit, featuring an XC7 CPU block and A-N-other brand of GPU block. The flow path of the system is pump/res > GPU > 360 rad > CPU > 360 rad > pump/res.

Could anyone give me a steer on the temps I should be seeing. Honestly, given that my CPU temp was maxing out in the 50's with my AIO, I was expecting better. I'm also concerned about the coolant temps.

I have a feeling that my setup may be sub optimal because I have the case in a fairly enclosed area. Ambient temp is ~22C and all fans are exhausting.

image.png.8db3bd0d717564cd5b3262d19013444c.png

Specs are:

  • 5600x
  • 6800XT
  • 32gb RAM
  • P500a Case
  • 2 x 360 rads
  • XC7 CPU block
  • XD5 pump

Thanks in advance for the help. Ignore the temps on the sensor panel. I have started to test the effects of increasing airflow with a tower fan.

PC1.jpg

PC2.jpg

PC3.jpg

Edited by Biege_Beast
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with the case enclosed there, your water temp will skyrocket.

You basically have aircooling temperatures there on your components. You really have to get the case out in the open, maybe on top of the desk, or it will keep recirculating hot air back in constantly.

The tower fan may help but it won't be magical.

 

Maybe redo your tests with the case on the desk, and see what the loop CAN actually achieve ?

With ambient at 22, i'd be surprised if water goes beyond 40°

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To add to it, as i had to run iRL ^^ , when you had your AIO, it was only cooling the CPU, and there was only one radiator in the case, so the front fans were bringing fresh air in. The GPU was affecting it but not by much probably.

Now the front fans pull fresh air through the radiator and blow warm air in the case. that warm air goes through the top radiator, not really helping to cool the water by much in this one.

As the front fans keep getting warmer air because of the enclosed space, you get close to thermal runaway where the loop keeps heating itself up.

Your current build can be seen as a ~500W heater, that you try to cool down in a box basically 🙂

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1 hour ago, LeDoyen said:

with the case enclosed there, your water temp will skyrocket.

You basically have aircooling temperatures there on your components. You really have to get the case out in the open, maybe on top of the desk, or it will keep recirculating hot air back in constantly.

The tower fan may help but it won't be magical.

 

Maybe redo your tests with the case on the desk, and see what the loop CAN actually achieve ?

With ambient at 22, i'd be surprised if water goes beyond 40°

Thanks for the advice LeDoyen.

I have repeated the tests with the PC out in the open. Results are below. I should say that the fan curves have been set to Hydro X at all times. Fixed speeds would probably have been a bit more of an apples to apples comparison.

image.png.2abcd9852ee30727974c3c263cbbdd99.png

So the temps are better. I think the coolant temp is the critical result here. An ~11C decrease resulted in the fans running slower, which is why there is only a 6/7C decrease in CPU and GPU temps.

I guess my next question would be - are the second set of results what you would expect to see?

Thanks.

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1 hour ago, LeDoyen said:

To add to it, as i had to run iRL ^^ , when you had your AIO, it was only cooling the CPU, and there was only one radiator in the case, so the front fans were bringing fresh air in. The GPU was affecting it but not by much probably.

Now the front fans pull fresh air through the radiator and blow warm air in the case. that warm air goes through the top radiator, not really helping to cool the water by much in this one.

As the front fans keep getting warmer air because of the enclosed space, you get close to thermal runaway where the loop keeps heating itself up.

Your current build can be seen as a ~500W heater, that you try to cool down in a box basically 🙂

So this is actually the second iteration of this build in less than a week. My first config was as you described; front intake and top exhaust. At the moment, this config is all exhaust.

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all exhaust iscertainly better 🙂

The second test looks a lot better. you can fine tune it by using custom fan and pump curves. The default ones aren't exactly stellar. 34°C water temp at idle with 22° ambient is quite a lot, but it's certainly due to very slow fans and pump speeds.

From there it's mostly personal preference, if you want to favor silence or temperatures.

Usually there's not much need to change pump speed by a lot. The default profiles tend to slow it way down on occasions. the GPU is more sensitive to it because of the huge die size. moderate to high load, with slow pump can get you higher temperatures. I tend not to go below 50 - 60%PWM on the pump, and increasing a bit as water temp increases.

For the fans, it's mostly a noise thing. You can create a custom fan curve and set it by loading the GPU, and trying to hold it at a temperature that you like.

If at 65° the fans were still quiet, you can increase the speed to a comfortable noise level, and see where the temperatures stabilize.

Under full load, with two 360 rads, i wouldn't be surprised if you could hold the water 5°C cooler. The 6800XT outputs 300 - 320W of heat and the 5600X is pretty much negligible, so you have a lot of headroom with two large radiators.

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Unfortunately environment always has the final say in overall performance.  If you are in a hot room in Summer at 30C, your temps are not going to look like that guy with the windows open in Winter.  As mentioned above, with the case in the cabinet, you are recycling all your waste heat.  That will cause the coolant temp to increase as long as it is under load.  With it removed from the cabinet, the coolant temp rise of +6C is spot on for that hardware and 2x360.  For that case, I would keep that front/top exhaust and passive rear intake if you can.

 

Coolant temp will always be minimum possible component temperature.  The GPUs usually do a pretty good job as stepping down at idle, so you will see a match there most of the time.  The CPU is always carrying some activity (and AMD Ryzen even more than Intel), so unless you tranquilize it with a bunch of power saving features, the CPU will only equal coolant temp when the Vcore is zero -- or powered down.  

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All exhaust can work well. All intake is also possible. There are issues and benefits to both approaches, some of which are dependent on environment. But you had two key things goings on that are resolved - one, get the case out in the airflow!! and two ... don't have one radiator feeding another radiator. Those will be your biggest gains.

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Seems that you already got answered a good bit of your questions so I will just add a bit to it.

Your problem is definitely airflow obstruction. The case it not exactly known for super great airflow (I've done a few builds in them myself), and enclosed in the closet was your biggest issue.

When showing your results, it is worth also noting the fan speeds. You say that you run the Hydro X fan curves and from that we can kinda guess what you are running at.

 

For comparison, I can run a 3080 + 7980XE (total 540W under load) with a single free standing XR5 360mm radiator with QL fans running at 1000 RPM (coolant temp at 48C, ambient 24.2c). If I bump the fans to 1500 RPM then I get the coolant down to 43C. So a case, and a case location with great airflow will give you a significant performance boost. I would not worry too much about it though, as your temps now seems fine, and you would "only" gain a less noisy system by upgrading your case.

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On 9/17/2021 at 10:47 PM, Corsair HP said:

Seems that you already got answered a good bit of your questions so I will just add a bit to it.

Your problem is definitely airflow obstruction. The case it not exactly known for super great airflow (I've done a few builds in them myself), and enclosed in the closet was your biggest issue.

When showing your results, it is worth also noting the fan speeds. You say that you run the Hydro X fan curves and from that we can kinda guess what you are running at.

 

For comparison, I can run a 3080 + 7980XE (total 540W under load) with a single free standing XR5 360mm radiator with QL fans running at 1000 RPM (coolant temp at 48C, ambient 24.2c). If I bump the fans to 1500 RPM then I get the coolant down to 43C. So a case, and a case location with great airflow will give you a significant performance boost. I would not worry too much about it though, as your temps now seems fine, and you would "only" gain a less noisy system by upgrading your case.

Thanks for the info. I actually can't easily have the PC out in the open, so I have asked the person who built the cabinet for me to make some mods.

I have also now ordered a 5000d, so will treat what I have learnt so far as good experience for that build.

In addition to the temps that I have recorded previously, I changed the fan orientation so they are pulling air in, so all positive. Updated temps below....again all on Hydro X profile, which seem to really up the fan speed when the water temp is >40C. The only configuration that hasn't resulted in the fans ramping up is full negative pressure outside of the cabinet, so it looks like negative gives you the thermal performance without creating a racket.

image.png.b449ea4331270de86cdd0c1333dc0839.png

What would you recommend the config be for the 5000d? I see that Jayztwocents had the front fans pulling in fresh, with the side and top rad mounted fans exhausting!?

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You don’t want to blow exhaust from one radiator into the intake of another. Exhaust air temp is approximately equal to the liquid temp passing through it and so you are then blowing 37C air at 37C water and the result is nothing changes. You effectively loose the top radiator as a cooling apparatus. You’ll see people do this often because they are unsure how to work a dual radiator system in a standard shape case, but the all exhaust, “negative pressure”, passive rear intake is the way to go — in or out of the cabinet. 
 

If you are going to stay in the cabinet, the trick will be to manage the exhaust flow and that will happen best with the top/front exhaust. You probably need some type of venting for the heat to escape the top and right side. In a worst case scenario a standard house fan blowing air into the cabinet may displace the warmer air. 

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9 hours ago, Biege_Beast said:

Thanks for the info. I actually can't easily have the PC out in the open, so I have asked the person who built the cabinet for me to make some mods.

I have also now ordered a 5000d, so will treat what I have learnt so far as good experience for that build.

In addition to the temps that I have recorded previously, I changed the fan orientation so they are pulling air in, so all positive. Updated temps below....again all on Hydro X profile, which seem to really up the fan speed when the water temp is >40C. The only configuration that hasn't resulted in the fans ramping up is full negative pressure outside of the cabinet, so it looks like negative gives you the thermal performance without creating a racket.

image.png.b449ea4331270de86cdd0c1333dc0839.png

What would you recommend the config be for the 5000d? I see that Jayztwocents had the front fans pulling in fresh, with the side and top rad mounted fans exhausting!?

I would reccomend having the 4 fans (front or side + back) push fresh air into the case, and have the two 360mm radiators blow air out of the case in a 5000D setup.

 

I configure most of my 5000D builds with 3 intake fans in the front, a intake fan in the rear and side/top radiator as exhaust..

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