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H115i RGB Platinum Coolant Temp Problem


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Hello,

I have problem with my H115i liquid cooler. When I play games, the coolant temperature goes up to 65 degrees. Sometimes it is 50C. Idle temprature is around 37-39C. I cleaned the radiator and fans. No matter what I do it doesn't work. Do you have any idea what is wrong? CPU temprature is good. Under load it is max 70C. What is the limit of coolant temp? I regret buying this cooler. I bought it 2 years ago. At the moment of writing this article, the temperature is 39.50 degrees at idle. Sorry for my bad English btw. I installed the latest ICUE update but I downgraded because I didn't like it. The temperatures were the same when it was already up to date. 

System;

Asus TUF GT501 case

R5 5600X Proccesor

Asus TUF RTX 3080

Corsair RM1000X PSU

 

 

Coolant.jpg

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This is typical of a blockage in the cooling loop.  The liquid cannot flow at the minimum required rate and the coolant in the CPU block stays there too long and heats up too much.  Are you sure the CPU temp only reads 70C when this happens?  The coolant temperature is the baseline or lowest possible CPU temp, so if the coolant is 60C, then the CPU temp is going to be around 80C+ with anything going on.  Any coolant temp over 50C is cause for concern, so this is an issue.  However, if the CPU temp really does appear normal, make sure you are not running HWiNFO, AIDA, or any other program that is trying to access the cooler's data.  That can cause erratic or impossible readings.

 

Most likely this is some type of blockage and there isn't a user remedy for this.  Start a Support Ticket with Corsair through the link at the very top of this page.  An AIO that has a blockage typically needs to be replaced.  

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@c-attack Thanks for your reply. I have no problem with CPU temprature. As i said, its max temprature level is 70C. Idle temprature is 36-37C. If there is a blockage in the cooling loop, shouldn't the CPU temperature be as high as you say? So there is no blockage i think. I have really no idea what is going on my coolant temprature level. When i also turn on RGB lights, temprature level rises. For example, when i play RDR2, coolant temp can be 46C. However, sometimes it is 60C. It may be software problem but when i put my hand on the radiator it is really hot. I have attached a picture. These are the current temperature levels. HWİNFO and ICUE show the same coolant temprature level. CPU temprature is 40C. As you see, i use extreme mode for cooler. 

 

Coolant 2 pic.jpg

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Quote

When i also turn on RGB lights, temprature level rises.

Unfortunately this is something we have seen on the Platinum coolers.  The RGB controller has an unintended effect on the liquid temperature sensor.  This makes fan control difficult.  You should still create a support ticket.  Some units respond to a firmware update.  Others not.  In the meantime I suggest using fixed fan speeds for both desktop and gaming.  Pick something quiet and for normal desktop work.  Set a speed you can tolerate before gaming.  You cannot overheat the cooler by choosing a fan speed that is a little too low or the slowest pump speed.  The differences between those settings are a handful of degrees.  40C at idle is pretty warm unless your room temp is in the 30s.  However, 60C liquid temp is out of bounds in all contexts.  It does not seem to be a valid data point, but it is still a problem.

 

If you are getting this much movement from coolant temp without the CPU temp moving in sync, then it is a software/sensor issue.  The RGB effect is a known issue, but again be careful when using HWiNFO at the same time.  It can cause fan lock speed lock ups or at a minimum bad data.  In this instance, you probably want to use fixed fan speeds to get things under control anyway, so that is less of a concern.

Edited by c-attack
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@c-attack Thanks again for your concern. Room temperature can be 30 degrees. Because of the summer. I don't use HWİNFO. I think it's a software problem but I'm not sure. The reason I think so is that sometimes when I turn on RGB or change profiles, the temperatures can suddenly drop. Sometimes it takes a long time for the temperatures to drop when I exit the game. While a game sees a maximum of 47C, the same game can see 60C the next time I play it. There are very variable temperatures. But overall it definitely sees 47 degrees. The highest rating I've seen was 65C for RDR2. However the CPU temprature never exceeded 72C. 

I will take your suggestions into consideration. But I'm also afraid that there will be damage to the cooler. The warranty period has probably expired. I don't want to deal with these transactions because of COVID-19. I really don't know what to do. For now the Idle temp is 45C. Room is very hot. If I try to play games, it will definitely see 60C 😞

 

Edited by Enistorm
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It's pretty unlikely that the cooler's warranty was expired - it's a 3 year warranty, IIRC. As for "dealing with the transaction" ... I'm not sure what you are talking about. Fill out a support ticket - most of it gets processed online. You can also request and Advanced RMA so that you get the cooler and then send the defective one back.

The temperature difference caused by the LEDs is usually just a couple of degrees. Your situation would seem extreme. Do the RMA.

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@DevBiker Thanks for your advice. My English is not good. So I may have been misunderstood. I am going to check my cooler warranty. I just played Wolfenstein 2. The temprature was 55C. When I opened the side cover of the case, the temperature dropped to 47C. Anyway, I will contact support.

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Perhaps we have two parallel issues here.  The RGB elevated temperature won't care what you do with the door.  Neither would a blockage.  However, this is typical of standard environmental heat.  If the inside of the case is 45C, then coolant will be at least 45C as well.  We know your room is warm for the Summer, but those coolant temps of 60C are beyond what you can create in the case on its own -- at least ordinarily.

 

Where is the radiator in the case?  Front intake?  Top exhaust?  What do you see listed as the motherboard temp value in HWiNFO during idle and gaming?  This is typically in the center of the board a decent estimate of case ambient temperature.

 

Try to isolate some of these potential issues.  Run a mild CPU stress test like CPU-Z (bench tab).  It is linear and should cause to the coolant to go up about 3C in the first minute and another 3C over the next 5 minutes or so.  5-10 min is all that is required.  If the coolant shoots up to 50C stop immediately.  This will take the GPU waste heat out of play and minimize any internal temperature penalties.  You might also want to set a static black color layer on top of the pump RGB lighting to remove that from the equation as well.  

Edited by c-attack
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2 hours ago, Enistorm said:

@DevBiker Thanks for your advice. My English is not good. So I may have been misunderstood. I am going to check my cooler warranty. I just played Wolfenstein 2. The temprature was 55C. When I opened the side cover of the case, the temperature dropped to 47C. Anyway, I will contact support.

@c-attack is right - there's something environmental at play here as well. Let's see what we can do to get that resolved. An 8 degree drop just from opening the door is pretty massive.

Edited by DevBiker
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@c-attack  @DevBiker 

12 hours ago, c-attack said:

You might also want to set a static black color layer on top of the pump RGB lighting to remove that from the equation as well.  

I don't use RGB anyway because of the heat. I use my cooler as Top exhaust.  Maybe my intake fans are not enough. There are 3 fans in the front. The one in the middle is broken. 2 fans are working. All are stock fans of the case.

I attached 3 pictures. First one Idle temp, Second one in game temp and third one stress temp. I turned on the computer 2 hours ago. So the temperatures may not have been high. The CPU was at 67 degrees in the gaming and stress test as usual. Sometime it peaks 73C in the game. I did a 10 minute CPU-Z stress test. In the stress test, coolant strangely neither fell nor rose from 41.30C. While playing Wolfenstein 2 last night, it was 55C, but today it did not exceed 46C. It's probably because the computer hasn't been turned on very long. I think it will increase if I play for a long time. The coolant temperature seems to increase disproportionately when the CPU temperature is high. Or not getting hot. It has very variable temperatures. 

The weather is really hot here. I don't know if the weather has an effect. There were also times in the winter when the cooler got disproportionately warm. But it never rose to 60-65C in winter. 

Idle temp.png

Gaming Temp.png

Stress Temp.png

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Unfortunately, I can't see the stats on here - I think the forum resizes the images.

But - I understand what you are seeing and we've seen this before. What case do you have? That will make a difference ... but the biggest thing is going to be the top exhaust placement. Reverse it to intake. You are feeding GPU heat into your cooler. I suspect that you have a case with a restricted top as well - if so, removing the top would also help but not as much as reversing it to intake.

The next is going to be the ambient temperature and yes, that has a big impact. The ambient temperature is going to be the baseline, lowest possible temperature for the cooler. The warmer the temp, the warmer the baseline.

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22 minutes ago, DevBiker said:

Unfortunately, I can't see the stats on here - I think the forum resizes the images.

Ouw you are right. Images are not clear. I actually uploaded it in PNG format. My case is ASUS TUF GT501. One of the biggest cases. Normally, there should be no problem with ventilation. GPU is not overheating but what you said may be true. I can reverse my cooler intake. I hope the cables will catch up. Because the case is really big. If I use the cooler as an intake, wouldn't it get hotter to take the hot air directly? My room is very hot.

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the air inside your case is hotter, since it's your room temp + GPU heat 🙂 At idle, the GPU still runs somewhat hot because of low fan speeds, so you may have case temperatures in the mid 40's easily.

switching the cooler to intake will have it only take room air so you may shave ~10° already even if it's 30 in your house.

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I can't quite read the middle picture data either, but it looks like the MB temp sensor (system 2?) is in the 40s.  That seems to match what you are seeing with the coolant and suggests most of the case ambient temperature is also in the 40s.  That is warm and it sets the baseline lowest possible temperature for anything.  If the inside of the case is 45C, then pretty much everything will be at least 45C.  Getting that warm at idle is not uncommon for people in warm climates and hot rooms.  +1C to your room temp is going to be +1C to everything in the case.  However, the extreme +20C knock on during gaming is not.  +10C is more common, but then most people are a lower starting temperature and thus don't run into trouble.  This brings us back around to the original problem.

 

1) This temperatures are real.  This is a problem because at 60C liquid temp, you are at the limit for the cooler.  Besides any construction concerns, a 60C liquid temp means 60C CPU temp with no voltage.  So when you load up a game, it should be banging off the 90-100C limiter.  That makes it unusable.  This is not what you are reporting.  Your coolant to CPU temp difference in the CPU-Z stress test is approximately 30C.  This is a common value for a non-overclocked CPU.  It also means if your coolant is 50C, then the CPU should hit peak temps of +30C above that.  

 

2) So then.... the coolant temperature is not real?  Something else is causing false readings?  We talked about this already and it certainly could be a wacky temp sensor in the unit.  That would cover several questions.  In trying to assess that, remember your CPU temp should peak about 30C over the coolant level.  However, if the coolant temp says 55C and the CPU reads 45C, the coolant temp is wrong or the CPU temp is wrong.  In this case we have reason to suspect the coolant temp sensor.

 

Assuming the coolant temp sensor is correct, then you appear to have a heat management issue.  It is very common for heavy GPU loads (gaming) to heat up the case and coolant far more than they do under a 100% CPU stress test.  However, it is uncommon to see anything more than a +10C rise.  At your baseline 38-40C coolant, I don't feel it should get past 50C regardless of what you are doing.  We have seen some really terrible results when people put the radiator against glass, a tight air filter, or some type of case design that prevents heat from escaping the radiator.  I have looked at that case and it is does not seem overly restrictive with a large offset the front and a clear path up top.  But then we are back to opening the door and the coolant temp drops immediately.  That suggests heat is stuck in the top layer surrounding the radiator and effectively warming it from the outside.

 

I am not sure we've made progress.  Short version:

  • Keep an eye on the coolant and cpu temps.  60C coolant and 60C CPU at load means the sensor is wrong and the unit needs to be replaced.  Rapidly changing coolant temps (+-5-10C in a matter of seconds) means the sensor is bad.  Coolant temp cannot change this fast.  1-2C per minute is about as fast as it should change, up or down.
  • It looks like the MB sensor is still in the 40s when gaming, but I can't read that screen.  I would expect the MB sensor and coolant to be close to each other at each stage.  If you see 65C coolant and 45C MB, then something is wrong with the senor.  I am leaning this direction at the moment.  If you heat up the entire radiator (and fluid inside) with the GPU, the CPU MUST suffer the same fate.   Most people will drop a few degrees by popping the door, regardless of set-up.  Your hardware temps do not seem like you are pushing the limits on the internal temperatures.  
  • Anything unusual with the location of the case in the room?  Do you have it in a cabinet, under a desk, stuffed in a corner... any place where the waste heat is being recycled as intake air back into the case?
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That case looks like it doesn't have any airflow restrictions out of the top - we do see this in some cases and it causes a "heat column" effect as the radiator exhaust can't get out. So that leaves the internal temperatures .... and they are going to be warm with the GPU as well as the VRMs and other components. But the GPU is the big 'un. The 1080Ti can still put out some heat and if that's going straight into your radiator's airflow, it'll warm things up. The minimum possible temperature for the coolant is going to be the air going through the radiator - and if the air going through the radiator is warmer than the coolant, it will actually warm up the coolant.

Also look at getting that broken front fan replaced. In your case, the SP Elite with the "Airflow" vanes (or whatever they are called) may be worth looking at. You need to direct as much cooler air as possible over that GPU with the ambient temp that you have.

I'm in Texas so I do understand the issue with heat in the summer. Even with AC here, we have a pretty wide variation in ambients based on season - the AC can only do so much when it's 110F in the shade and bright sunshine. Physics is a pain sometimes.

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31 minutes ago, DevBiker said:

But the GPU is the big 'un. The 1080Ti can still put out some heat and if that's going straight into your radiator's airflow, it'll warm things up. The minimum possible temperature for the coolant is going to be the air going through the radiator - and if the air going through the radiator is warmer than the coolant, it will actually warm up the coolant.

I have ASUS TUF RTX 3080 now. Temprature is good. 1080Ti was my old card. GPU temp is max 65C. It's usually 60C. I live in Turkey. It's 32C here right now. I will replace the broken fan with a new one. Maybe it really does have an effect.

@LeDoyen So you suggest that use the cooler as intake? Actually, my case is suitable for all kinds of use. I doubt it will work, but I think I'll give it a try.

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54 minutes ago, c-attack said:

Anything unusual with the location of the case in the room?  Do you have it in a cabinet, under a desk, stuffed in a corner... any place where the waste heat is being recycled as intake air back into the case?

It's under the table, all open. I just use a ventilator because of the heat, it blows a little towards the top of the case. It may have an effect on the air taken in. I am not sure. I am trying to show my tempratures by uploading images. The website distorts the image a lot. Do you suggest that use the cooler as intake? I am going to add a fan to front. Maybe it works. First one is Idle. Second one is in gaming temp. Now the images are clear i think.

 

IDLE TEMP 2.png

Gaming Temp 2.png

Wolfenstein 2 afterburner.png

Edited by Enistorm
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Ok, I am comfortable ruling out a blockage. Need to keep watching on the sensor and the RGB add on effect can compound problems, but I think the bulk of this is environmental. 
 

If this is a closed desk (solid back and side walls), things are going to be difficult. You are pumping hot air out of the case and it has nowhere to go. It is inevitable you will heat up a large area of the room and especially under the desk. If this is an open design with no side or back walls, you can make this work. Use a house/room fan to blow at the front of the case or whatever angle is practical. You are trying to blow the exhaust from the case out the back or sides of the desk. Hopefully this stops the heat recycling around the case. Even with a closed desk this may help. 
 

You will want as many front intake fans as your case allows. Hopefully this helps blow heat out the back and less being pulled into the top radiator. Without positive intake pressure (more intake than exhaust air volume), the exhaust fans will take air into the case from other places. That may not be helpful if it’s pulling air in from rear or top spaces on the case. 
 

Changing the radiator fans to intake on top might help, but not if there is little space between the top of the case and the desk. The air up there is probably as warm as inside the case. This still might be helpful, but I would start with the other measures first. 

Edited by c-attack
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@c-attack The weather is warmer today. Computer has been on for 10 hours and I'm playing games. Max coolant temp is 48.90C. My CPU temprature is about 67-70C. I think that is normal. I attached my desk image. There is nothing surrounding the case. Only the back is a little close to my bed. The image is a bit dark as it is night here now. Sorry for that. But as you can see the left, right and front are open and the table is not too low. A little far from the left side of the case, the ventilator works to cool me down. Unfortunately, I don't have a choice of another place to put the ventilator. That's why it's blowing from the left of the case. 

I will keep my eyes on the sensor and replace a new fan to the front. 

1044507918_ventimage.thumb.jpeg.ffccc2411f1b1cf7082c28725123ff68.jpeg

49837012_Deskimage.thumb.jpeg.76bcd0d76583b4038b4397fb2946bf0a.jpeg

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OK, that's more like it.  A 48C coolant temp is warm, but that is only +10C over your starting point and that is a common change for GPU heavy gaming and top mount.  It's when you say the coolant is 60-70C that I get concerned because that can't really happen outside a case temp of 50-60C.  So perhaps with the warmer than normal conditions plus the "RGB effect" from the Platinum LEDs, that could lead to a false 60C coolant temp number while still maintaining a functional operating state since the coolant is not actually 60-70C.  Since your actual hardware temps are relatively normal for gaming, I don't think there is a lot of cause for concern.  I would suggest you use the manual fan speeds on the radiator for something comfortable for noise.  Otherwise the fans will run pretty much at maximum all the time on any of the presets.  

 

As for the room, fan, desk stuff...  that desk is as open as them come, so not such a big issue.  It's hot, you need the big room fan for you.  However, any kind of air movement in the room is good.  It will have an affect on the general area and that's all you want.  You can't cool down the PC by blowing air it from the outside.  You can prevent a heat bubble of 45-50C air getting trapped above and around the case.  If the fan is blowing on you, it is probably helping with that too.  Flipping the radiator fans to intake might help, but it's hard to be sure.   It can help push hot GPU air in the case away from the radiator.  It also might help move the bulk of the exhaust out the back where it can escape, rather than heat up the desk from the underside.  There's no way to be sure without trying.  Might be worth a go at some point.  

Edited by c-attack
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1 hour ago, c-attack said:

So perhaps with the warmer than normal conditions plus the "RGB effect" from the Platinum LEDs, that could lead to a false 60C coolant temp number while still maintaining a functional operating state since the coolant is not actually 60-70C. 

I always keep RGB off so that the heat does not increase. Could it still be doing wrong sensor detection due to case temperature?

1 hour ago, c-attack said:

I would suggest you use the manual fan speeds on the radiator for something comfortable for noise.  Otherwise the fans will run pretty much at maximum all the time on any of the presets.

You are right. When coolant temp is high, fans work full speed. So it makes noise. But I don't slow down the fans as I'm afraid there will be a problem. It affects the temperature rise of the cooler. I let it use auto as noise doesn't make much of a problem. Even in silent mode, it takes the fans to maximum mode due to the heat. 

1 hour ago, c-attack said:

Since your actual hardware temps are relatively normal for gaming, I don't think there is a lot of cause for concern.

So you are thinking that there is no problem. If there was a problem with cooler, the CPU temperature would be high, right? I guess I can start to worry when the CPU temperature exceeds 80C. For now, CPU temperature is fine for the summer months. As you know, AMD Zen 3 series gets hot. For all that, my CPU temperature is maximum 73C. So the cooler does its job well. I will try your suggestions.

Thanks again for taking the time for me.

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If there is something wrong with the sensor, then it may still show incorrect values, RGB on or not.  This high 30s to high 40s range matches your environment conditions and is normal for that baseline.  A coolant temp of more than 50C is concerning and anything like 60C or more is a serious problem that needs to be addressed.  You should never see 60C on the coolant.  

 

That +30C difference between the coolant and CPU temp on the CPU-Z stress test is a good estimator of maximum expected temp.  So yes, if you can keep the coolant below 50C, then you should never go past 80C doing normal stuff like playing games.  There are a few synthetic tests that can create even more heat than that, but you have no reason to be using any of them.  No reason for you run Prime 95 small FFT.  Given the elevated baseline, I would say your CPU and GPU temps are quite good.  Those are the numbers that matter for daily monitoring.  

Edited by c-attack
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41 minutes ago, c-attack said:

So yes, if you can keep the coolant below 50C, then you should never go past 80C doing normal stuff like playing games. 

You say the coolant and CPU temperatures are parallel in a way. If there is a problem with the cooler, we can say that the CPU temp goes above 80 degrees. In short, if my CPU is 70 degrees and the cooler is 60 degrees, can I ignore it? That is all i want to hear 🙂

Edited by Enistorm
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If the coolant temp reads 60C and your CPU temp is only 70C, that's only going to happen at minimum idle voltage (0.60-0.80v).  If you are playing games and the coolant is 60C with only a 70C CPU temp, then the liquid reading is false.  This is an issue for fan control which is why I suggest using the fixed speeds.  

 

If the CPU temp goes above 80C with a coolant temp of just over 50C, then you need to work on case heat management and the environmental conditions.  Of course in two months you are going to be 10C lower across the board and won't be as concerned. This kind of stuff is a common line of questioning in Summer.  

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28 minutes ago, c-attack said:

If the coolant temp reads 60C and your CPU temp is only 70C, that's only going to happen at minimum idle voltage (0.60-0.80v).  If you are playing games and the coolant is 60C with only a 70C CPU temp, then the liquid reading is false.  This is an issue for fan control which is why I suggest using the fixed speeds.

So my problem is false reading. My CPU runs between 1.35-1.45V. I use AMD Curve Optimizer. CPU can reach 4.8GHZ. It is impossible to reach 4.8GHZ with between 0.60-0.80V. I am going to use fixed fan speed and check what will happen. I got some relief. I think it's a software or other issue. I never thought it was a hardware problem. Because of the CPU temprature. If there is a hardware problem, I think it affects the CPU. 

Thank you for taking time for me. I'll let you know if there are any improvement.

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