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Hydro Series H60 Possible Pump Failure


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I think my H60 pump has failed.

 

The CPU is running @99c (radiator is dust free)

 

I've got the pump connected to fan header 'CPU1' and the radiator fan connected to fan header 'CPU2'

 

The fan header CPU 1 shows 0 RPM

The fan header CPU 2 shows 1950 RPM

 

 

Does the pump send rotational data to the motherboard BIOS?

 

Thanks for any help or advice.

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On that model it does. You also should get a CPU Boot error when you attempt the start the PC. Make sure the BIOS fan control setting for the header connected to the pump is set to 100%, Disabled, Full Speed, or however your BIOS describes the locked 12v state. Low voltage can prevent the pump from starting. Aside from that, it would appear that unit is no longer functional. Contact Corsair Support if within the warranty period or look for a replacement.
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On that model it does. You also should get a CPU Boot error when you attempt the start the PC. Make sure the BIOS fan control setting for the header connected to the pump is set to 100%, Disabled, Full Speed, or however your BIOS describes the locked 12v state. Low voltage can prevent the pump from starting. Aside from that, it would appear that unit is no longer functional. Contact Corsair Support if within the warranty period or look for a replacement.

 

The machine functions like it always has so I'm tending to believe that the 99°c BIOS reading is somehow wrong...........but, if the CPU is not overheating then why is the radiator fan ramping up to it's maximum speed??

 

If the pump has failed for whatever reason and the CPU is at 99°c why is the machine still functioning fine?

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You don’t see too many motherboard errors where it gets the cpu temp wrong, especially on the BIOS level. It’s a native sensor. Combined with a zero rpm reading from the pump, you seem to have a legitimate problem.

 

If are looking for supporting evidence, try to get to the bios quickly on a cold boot after the pc has been off for quite a while. You should be able to catch the cpu ramping up in temperature. It will go fast as if skip counting by 5s. This is the result of the water in the block remaining stationary.

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You don’t see too many motherboard errors where it gets the cpu temp wrong, especially on the BIOS level. It’s a native sensor. Combined with a zero rpm reading from the pump, you seem to have a legitimate problem.

 

If are looking for supporting evidence, try to get to the bios quickly on a cold boot after the pc has been off for quite a while. You should be able to catch the cpu ramping up in temperature. It will go fast as if skip counting by 5s. This is the result of the water in the block remaining stationary.

 

Everything happens as you suggest and the image capture below shows the CPU 1 header (pump) at 0 RPM and the CPU header 2 (radiator fan) at 2020 RPM so it seems the pump has failed. My only reservation is if the CPU is at 99°c why is the machine still running? I am aware that thermal throttling is utilised if the CPU is overheating but why is this thermal throttling not represented in the CPU temperature?

 

Untitled-6.jpg

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I'm not sure if the system will shut down or if the CPU with throttle down, making the temp drop a little, making the CPU speed back up, making it hotter, making it throttle and slow back down, and so on. Either way, you are playing a very dangerous game.

 

I have had Corsair pumps in H110i-GT and H110i coolers whack out when under PWM control. The pumps stopped and the temps skyrocketed to ~100°C very quickly. This was with an i7-5820K and an i7-8700K. My systems did not automatically shut down when this happened. Maybe they would have but I cut power fast when I saw these temps. You do not want your CPU running over 90°C for any length of time. Don't sit there looking at it wondering why it's not shutting down. Kill the power as fast as you can. Pull the cord if you have to. Otherwise you may damage the CPU. It sounds like the pump failed so open a ticket (if its under warranty) or get a new cooler.

 

Good luck!

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The passive cooling from the AIO may be enough to let the CPU run at ridiculously low frequency.

I recently helped a friend who had a Dell PC with a dead CPU fan. I realized she had been running it like that for probably 2 or 3 years, at a constant 97°C.. besides the concrete like thermal paste taht was a nightmare to clean up, the thing was just fine after cooler replacement.

If the CPU can't dissipate anything, like, no cooler attached, it will shutdown.

 

Now i'm not saying keep your PC running like that :p you have a watercooler and having a CPU close to water boiling point attached to it isn't really a good thing..

Thermal throttling won't be seen in temperature. it will be seen in frequency. The CPU will constantly stay at its maximum temp as Speeedy said, but frequency will keep bumping down to stay as fast as possible without shutting down.

 

Time to contact Corsair

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The problem is solved, I hope.

 

I replaced the water-cooling block and it's associated radiator and fan and the pump is now displaying a rotation speed (the pump is connected to fan header CPU2)

 

The radiator fan is also displaying a rotation speed (the fan is connected to fan header CPU 1)

 

The pump speed looks high but I don't know the RPM range of these pumps.

 

At rest the CPU is now displaying 45°c

 

I am amazed that the machine did not seem to mind running for around 12hrs a day with the CPU sitting at 99°c

 

Anyway all seems well again. I would like to thank everyone for their help and support.

 

MSI-Snap-Shot-00.jpg

 

MSI-Snap-Shot.jpg

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Does it really run that fast?

 

I don’t think so. There is no pump spec listed for the 2013 version, but I have always suspected it is another of those pumps that report a raw value to the BIOS without the normal pump divider of 2. A small CPU socket mounted pump at 4000 something RPM would be like a dentist drill on a drum skin. The 1/2 value puts it closer to its 2013 H100i/H80i cousins.

 

Make sure you keep the pump on PWM, 100%, or “disabled” to keep it at the 4600 (2300) rpm speed. With small surface area radiators you can’t give away flow rate and the pump was designed to operate at 12v at all times. The fan can be adjusted.

Edited by c-attack
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The speed pulse is generated by little magnets embedded in the impeller and sensed by the pump. To keep the impeller balanced there's usually two magnets at opposing sides, so that gives two pulses per rotation.

The motherboard shows that raw value but Corsair programmed iCUE in a way that it would divide by 2 on AIO pumps to show the real speed.

 

It's the same deal on custom loop pumps, always speed x2

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