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H115i RGB Pro XT coolant temps don't seem right


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I have the radiator on the front of the case with the supplied fans pulling and another set of fans pushing. The problem I'm seeing is that the coolant temps showing in iCue start around 28.6C at idle and top out at 29.8 when running a stress test using Intel Extreme Tuning Utility. The CPU temps top out at around 85C when VCore starts throttling to prevent higher CPU temps.

As a result, the Corsair fans and the unit's pump never ramp up even when on extreme settings. I have made a custom fan curve that goes to 100% when coolant temps hit 28.8C. But the pump is always at approx. 2,695 RPM when on the extreme setting and of course, I can't define a custom curve for the pump.

This simply doesn't seem right. The coolant temps should be rising much more than they are when the CPU temps are at max. of approx. 85C.

I used the correct standoffs and screws when installing the pump as well as the supplied thermal compound. The pump seems firmly seated on the CPU. The top of the radiator is about 2" higher than the pump. There are no sounds coming from the pump.

 

Could this be a defective temp sensor in the pump? What else can I do to find and hopefully fix the cause of this behavior?

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This is for the 10980 XE in your specs? A +60C Coolant to CPU temp differential is a bit high, but this is absolutely voltage dependent. It’s possible for auto voltage to scale up much too far in certain stress tests. See if you can get an exact value before tearing things apart. Otherwise this reads like a contact issue.

 

Coolant rise is a matter of watts in vs watts out (dissipated) so fans only can affect the coolant temp which also serves as lowest possible cpu temp at 0V. If you fan speeds are too low the test will start out at a normal level but continuously climb over the course of the test as watts in exceeds watts dissipated. If the cpu is 85C one second in and stays there, you are looking at voltage or contact.

 

It is possible to have a defective coolant sensor, but then you cpu temp still would start lower and build up 6-8C over 10 min whether you can see the coolant temp or not. That does not seem to be case here.

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Yes, this question is regarding the system in my specs.

The idle temps for the CPU and coolant stay relatively constant when at idle so the idle fan speeds seem sufficient to maintain acceptable idle temps for the CPU at approx. 40C. The Package Temperature fluctuates briefly to as high as 50C when on idle due to background system activity. Ambient air is controlled at approx. 73F.

The voltages to the CPU are being controlled by the Intel Performance Maximizer application which throttles power to the CPU to achieve maximum processor frequency within power limits set by Intel for the specific CPU it is controlling.

So, if I am reading your reply correctly, the coolant temps not rising much when the CPU temps are hitting max could be due to a contact issue between the pump and the CPU. And you believe this behavior would not be due to a faulty coolant temp. sensor.

After your reply with this additional information and waiting for other replies, it may indeed be time to re-seat the pump to the CPU.

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I would try and get an exact reading for Vcore while you are under Intel XTU or any other stress test. If you are seeing 1.38-1.40v on Vcore, then we know what the issue is and you don't need to take anything off. The CPU-Z stress test under the bench tab is a good one as well because it's a fixed load. You start the test, CPU temp hits XX degrees one second later. It will hold that CPU temp as long as the coolant stays the same. Each +1C to CPU is temp also likely +1C to coolant temp. It makes it very easy to see the relationship between CPU temp and coolant temp while offering a check against the CUE reading.
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I would try and get an exact reading for Vcore while you are under Intel XTU or any other stress test. If you are seeing 1.38-1.40v on Vcore, then we know what the issue is and you don't need to take anything off. The CPU-Z stress test under the bench tab is a good one as well because it's a fixed load. You start the test, CPU temp hits XX degrees one second later. It will hold that CPU temp as long as the coolant stays the same. Each +1C to CPU is temp also likely +1C to coolant temp. It makes it very easy to see the relationship between CPU temp and coolant temp while offering a check against the CUE reading.

 

I was seeing high core voltage and core VID so I uninstalled the Intel Maximizer application and will do my overclock manually.

 

That however isn't the problem--the issue is that the coolant temperature doesn't rise as much as it should. Setting the voltage issue aside, I will re-seat the CPU and see if that impacts the coolant temperatures. Thanks again for your help. At least I will get the voltages under control!

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  • 1 month later...

Hello,

I could not find how to create a new thread, so I chose this because I am having s similar problem. About 2 weeks ago I started noticing that my CPU was running hotter. When I first installed my H115i a number of years ago The temperature would stay around 26 - 28C and when I played graphic intense games it would run around 48-50C. Two weeks ago it started running at 35-36C and during games or opening multiple brower windows, it wos running at 60 - 65C. I changed to thermal paste twice (new batch of MX-4) and it didn't help. recently it seems to run around 50C and games 70 - 72C.

My ASUS MAXIMUS VI Extreme MB has a ROG fixed digital CPU temp display so I am constantly aware of the CPU temp. Does it sound like the older H115i could be the problem? I've head that over time air will permeate the closed system reducing the cooling capabilities. I just received a brand new H115i RGB Platinum cooler, but am hesitant to swap it and find that there is something else wrong. I've searched but can't seem to find anything that would point to another reason why the CPU temp would all of a sudden be an issue

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the CPU temp displayed by the motherboard is a sensor under the socket usually; not the CPU itself. could it be that the room, or the inside of the PC case itself is warmer than a few weeks back?

My motherboard has a temperature display too, but it's so unreliable compared to real CPU temp i wouldn't trust it.

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LeDoyen, thanks for your reply. The room temp has not changed to explain the readings I see. I understand about not trusting the sensor, however...the readings used to be pretty stationary in non-gaming mode and again in gaming mode.

More importantly the H115i fans spin up as the gaming temperature changes.

I'm gonna guess that it's the fact that the existing older H115i has started going bad.

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Two weeks ago it started running at 35-36C and during games or opening multiple brower windows, it wos running at 60 - 65C.

 

There are multiple reasons for the CPU temp to suddenly shift. It can be a physical issue, a settings mishap, or even a program bug keeping cores loaded. However, if the AIO is involved in the problem, you will see a definite shift in coolant temperature (H115i Temp) in the Link/CUE app. Normally this will ride about 4-7C above room temperature for most users, with a lot of variables related to position, case layout, CPU type, power levels, etc.

 

However, a cooler with some type of blockage or flow issue will start to climb in H115i Temp from the moment you boot up and continue to so. It could be as much as +15-20C above the case temp. That is a clear warning. When the blockage is not so severe, it may be harder to detect but aside from warmer idle temps, it will also take longer to cool down. If you run a simple 5 min CPU stress test with CPU-Z or something else not overly taxing, you would expect to see a +6C or so rise in H115i Temp. If you see +10-15C or more, something is wrong. If it goes up +10C, but then won't come down... something is wrong.

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