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H100i Platinum USB issue and 3900X overheating,AIO malfunctioning?


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Hey guys,

I noticed today when I installed usb cable that is not attached to the pump all the way.

I pushed it with a bit force but it won't go in more then on the picture.

Is this an issue or pretty much normal?

I get RGB on pump,and I suppose pump works fine.

But saw on some video that one guy firmly pushed it all the way.

I'm having an issue of cooling 3900X,when running prime95 temp reaches 95 C in a matter of a minute,which is not normal.

How can I check if the pump/AIO is okay?

f8f4391372070331.jpg

Edited by frozensun
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You should be able to detect coolant temperature in CUE and the Platinum will appear as a device if the USB connector is inserted. Normal coolant temperature is about 4-7C over room temp at idle and might go up about 8C on extended loads. This is a function of power output over time vs how much the radiator can dissipate. So if you see coolant temp racing up 5-10-15...20C, there likely is some type of flow issue. However, nearly all issues with Prime95 relate to voltage and BIOS settings for conditions only brought out during those types of CPU instructions. In a working cooler, you will only see the coolant go up a few degrees in 60 seconds or so.
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Your pump isn't dead or you would have 30-60 seconds after pressing power before the entire system shutdown.

 

If the coolant temperature is hanging around 30C on the desktop, you don't have a flow problem either. It would continually creep up to higher levels if this was the case. The actual minimum possible coolant temperature is the ambient case temp for the area where the radiator is mounted. 30C would be pretty typical for the top of the case.

 

So you are back to beginning and whether running Prime95 is an accurate assessment of your cooling capacity. Dozens of people post this same question on a regular basis under the assumption the cooler can somehow prevent the CPU from getting hot in the first place. The first level of CPU cooling is conductive. This is voltage + CPU material and the heat is conducted into the cooling system. The water is the waste heat removal. It transports the CPU heat to the radiator to be blown somewhere else, but the relationship is +-1C coolant = +-1C CPU temp. So in order to make your Prime 95 temp go from 95C to 65C, you would need to reduce coolant temp from 30C to 0C. Obviously that is not a viable goal and if the coolant is not elevated, you are looking for a different problem.

 

I would suggest you run the CPU-Z stress/bench test. It is also fixed load, but milder than Prime. If you have a cooler or contact problem, it also will be untenable. However, if at 100% your CPU temp is 70C, then you know there are other BIOS settings and voltages you need to account for. This is by far the most common reason for higher than expected temps. Note the Vcore readings for both tests.

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Your pump isn't dead or you would have 30-60 seconds after pressing power before the entire system shutdown.

 

If the coolant temperature is hanging around 30C on the desktop, you don't have a flow problem either. It would continually creep up to higher levels if this was the case. The actual minimum possible coolant temperature is the ambient case temp for the area where the radiator is mounted. 30C would be pretty typical for the top of the case.

 

So you are back to beginning and whether running Prime95 is an accurate assessment of your cooling capacity. Dozens of people post this same question on a regular basis under the assumption the cooler can somehow prevent the CPU from getting hot in the first place. The first level of CPU cooling is conductive. This is voltage + CPU material and the heat is conducted into the cooling system. The water is the waste heat removal. It transports the CPU heat to the radiator to be blown somewhere else, but the relationship is +-1C coolant = +-1C CPU temp. So in order to make your Prime 95 temp go from 95C to 65C, you would need to reduce coolant temp from 30C to 0C. Obviously that is not a viable goal and if the coolant is not elevated, you are looking for a different problem.

 

I would suggest you run the CPU-Z stress/bench test. It is also fixed load, but milder than Prime. If you have a cooler or contact problem, it also will be untenable. However, if at 100% your CPU temp is 70C, then you know there are other BIOS settings and voltages you need to account for. This is by far the most common reason for higher than expected temps. Note the Vcore readings for both tests.

 

Ohh okay.

My fans are installed as intake from case to exhaust through radiator into the room because I want to look at tge beautiful RGB effects inside case.

Is that okay for installation of fans?

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You can use the fans as exhaust so you can see them. Most people do. The total amount of energy (watts) the radiator can dissipate is affected by the temperature of the air entering the radiator. So a radiator with an intake air temp of 25C has the potential to remove more heat than an identical radiator with 30C air. However, this does not mean it lowers your CPU temp dramatically.

 

When you start a fixed load test like Prime or CPU-Z, the cpu temp you get the moment it hits 100% is the minimum possible cpu temp for that voltage and case temp. As you continue to run CPU-Z bench, you will see the cpu temp creep up +1C every 30 seconds or so. That is the coolant temp warming and the part you can control. However, that first big jump to 80-90C is not. The only way to reduce that is to lower Vcore voltage or lower the ambient temperature. This is a much larger part of the total temperature compared to coolant shifts.

 

Where you may see higher cpu temps is when gaming or anything else that has extended gpu power levels. The gpu waste heat will increase the ambient temperature in the central zone and elevate coolant temp along with it. If the case temp in the top is 40C, then that is also the coolant and minimum cpu temp. This only matters if the cpu is being heavily taxed at the same time and that is not common for gaming, but is an issue for things like folding or something else maximizing both cpu and gpu simultaneously.

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