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xd5 pump, no commander pro, using mobo temp sensor


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Hey yall,

 

Just completed my first loop with an XD5 pump res and a cpu block. I do not have a commander pro. I wanted to ask if anyone has experience plugging in the liquid temp sensor into the MOBO and using the bios to set the fan curves/ pump curve to be based of the liquid temperature?

 

sorry this is somewhat of an open question I just want to know if I can manually create the profiles that the commander pro uses, and if there are recommended values to set for the fan curves if doing this. Also want to know if I should leave any of the fans to be set off cpu temp alone.

 

I have just booted it up and been playing around with it for about 60 minutes and my CPU temp has been going form low 40's to mid 50's, spiking then dropping down causing the fans to rev up every couple of minutes. my main goal is to get this to stabilize and be more constant.

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Hi,

 

I'm using the Commander to manage the Pump, and yet for context, can tell you that the pump runs at about 1900 rpm when there is no load and the coolant temp is below 30 degrees C.

 

If I want, i can program a custom curve, which based on these fixed % equates to these RPM numbers:

 

25% = 1076 RPM

50% = 2429 RPM

75% = 3785 RPM

100% = 4800 RPM

 

Anything 75% and higher seems to introduce air bubbles into the reservoir, as the fluid gets pretty cloudy. I've never seen the Commander ramp the pump up above 2400 RPM, even after a couple hours of gaming (I'm running both my 9900K and 3090 through 2 rads, a 280mm and 360mm).

 

Hopefully these values help you design a fan curve that works for your setup.

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Hi,

 

I'm using the Commander to manage the Pump, and yet for context, can tell you that the pump runs at about 1900 rpm when there is no load and the coolant temp is below 30 degrees C.

 

If I want, i can program a custom curve, which based on these fixed % equates to these RPM numbers:

 

25% = 1076 RPM

50% = 2429 RPM

75% = 3785 RPM

100% = 4800 RPM

 

Anything 75% and higher seems to introduce air bubbles into the reservoir, as the fluid gets pretty cloudy. I've never seen the Commander ramp the pump up above 2400 RPM, even after a couple hours of gaming (I'm running both my 9900K and 3090 through 2 rads, a 280mm and 360mm).

 

Hopefully these values help you design a fan curve that works for your setup.

 

what would the corresponding fluid temperatures be tho, like if 30c and bellow = 30%, what temperature would I set for max RPM?

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i did use the mobo to control my loop on several occasions. it works just fine as long as you have a temp sensor input on your motherboard. The only difference is you won't use iCUE really.

 

As for setup, it's hard to answer. if you only have the CPU on the loop, i wouldn't worry about pump speed. set it at a quiet setting like 40% fixed and you're good to go.

Only control fan speed from the water temp.I personally aim at 35 - 36°C max water temp, which would be very reasonable for just CPU cooling on a single rad.

How many RPM, or PWM%? can't say, it depends on your case air flow, your fan models, your room temperature.. you will have to experiment.

 

Maybe start cinebench in loop, and open AI suite, let the water warm up to what you deem would be a good maximum and set the fan speed to stop the temp rising. then set a curve going to this point ?

 

@Gusd2, if you get air bubbles at high pump speed, then your loop is probably not bled yet. looks like you still have air pockets you need to work out to the reservoir.

You should be able to run the pump at full speed with no bubbles going through ;)

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^^^^^^^^ MB or any other 10K thermistor receptor should read temp, but it’s hard to give you temp points because identical hardware in an identical loop path would give different temps based on your room/case temp. Then when you start introducing loop design and components there are just too many possibilities.

 

I generally recommend you start off using fixed pump speeds so you can watch other factors. 1500 at the desktop. Maybe 2500-3000 on load to start. However, if you can only access control through the bios, that won’t work. In that instance maybe a simple step curve with a 1500 rpm base and a jump to 3000 at 30C and above. If this is just a cpu block, 1 radiator loop, you are not going to need a lot of pump speed.

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i did use the mobo to control my loop on several occasions. it works just fine as long as you have a temp sensor input on your motherboard. The only difference is you won't use iCUE really.

 

As for setup, it's hard to answer. if you only have the CPU on the loop, i wouldn't worry about pump speed. set it at a quiet setting like 40% fixed and you're good to go.

Only control fan speed from the water temp.I personally aim at 35 - 36°C max water temp, which would be very reasonable for just CPU cooling on a single rad.

How many RPM, or PWM%? can't say, it depends on your case air flow, your fan models, your room temperature.. you will have to experiment.

 

Maybe start cinebench in loop, and open AI suite, let the water warm up to what you deem would be a good maximum and set the fan speed to stop the temp rising. then set a curve going to this point ?

 

@Gusd2, if you get air bubbles at high pump speed, then your loop is probably not bled yet. looks like you still have air pockets you need to work out to the reservoir.

You should be able to run the pump at full speed with no bubbles going through ;)

 

This makes sense but to confirm your suggesting setting all 6 PWM fans to be based off of the liquid temperature, and in the example above set the max rpm for the fan curve at lets say 36 degrease (could change after testing)? case is corsair 4000D airflow.

 

also I don't have air bubbles running through the loop, a bunch of small ones on the walls of the reservoir which sounds standard and I think they will go away in time.

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i did use the mobo to control my loop on several occasions. it works just fine as long as you have a temp sensor input on your motherboard. The only difference is you won't use iCUE really.

 

As for setup, it's hard to answer. if you only have the CPU on the loop, i wouldn't worry about pump speed. set it at a quiet setting like 40% fixed and you're good to go.

Only control fan speed from the water temp.I personally aim at 35 - 36°C max water temp, which would be very reasonable for just CPU cooling on a single rad.

How many RPM, or PWM%? can't say, it depends on your case air flow, your fan models, your room temperature.. you will have to experiment.

 

Maybe start cinebench in loop, and open AI suite, let the water warm up to what you deem would be a good maximum and set the fan speed to stop the temp rising. then set a curve going to this point ?

 

@Gusd2, if you get air bubbles at high pump speed, then your loop is probably not bled yet. looks like you still have air pockets you need to work out to the reservoir.

You should be able to run the pump at full speed with no bubbles going through ;)

 

Interesting, thanks for the insight. I didn't run the pump full speed for more than a few hours, because I couldn't wait to get to some thermal tests. I'll kick it up and let it purge out the excess air. Thanks!

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This makes sense but to confirm your suggesting setting all 6 PWM fans to be based off of the liquid temperature, and in the example above set the max rpm for the fan curve at lets say 36 degrease (could change after testing)? case is corsair 4000D airflow.

 

also I don't have air bubbles running through the loop, a bunch of small ones on the walls of the reservoir which sounds standard and I think they will go away in time.

 

4000D Airflow will most likely never require you to go to max RPM.

In my case that max temp of 36° is achieved with the fans at 1500 rpm (max 2200).

 

You'll have to chose a temperature depending on what you want to achieve with watercooling.

If you want maximum performance (mostly for GPUs.. CPUs are less affected by hotter temps), then tweak the fan speeds to have the temps you're after.

 

If it's silence, you can chose a higher working water temperature. The warmer the radiators are, the more efficient they are at dissipating heat, since it's a factor of temperature differential between the radiator fins and the passing air.

 

So, the hotter you let them run, the lower you can run your fans to dissipate the same heat load.

 

If i use my old fan curve with a 35°C max setpoint, fans run at 1700 rpm under full load (~500W).

Same heat load with the fan curve set to 36° : 1500 rpm.

I could set it to say 38 and render it even more silent.

 

Now you are only cooling a 3800x if your profile is up to date, that's a 105W TDP part, so depending on what size radiator you have, you may end up with pretty slow fan speeds in a 4000D

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4000D Airflow will most likely never require you to go to max RPM.

In my case that max temp of 36° is achieved with the fans at 1500 rpm (max 2200).

 

You'll have to chose a temperature depending on what you want to achieve with watercooling.

If you want maximum performance (mostly for GPUs.. CPUs are less affected by hotter temps), then tweak the fan speeds to have the temps you're after.

 

If it's silence, you can chose a higher working water temperature. The warmer the radiators are, the more efficient they are at dissipating heat, since it's a factor of temperature differential between the radiator fins and the passing air.

 

So, the hotter you let them run, the lower you can run your fans to dissipate the same heat load.

 

If i use my old fan curve with a 35°C max setpoint, fans run at 1700 rpm under full load (~500W).

Same heat load with the fan curve set to 36° : 1500 rpm.

I could set it to say 38 and render it even more silent.

 

Now you are only cooling a 3800x if your profile is up to date, that's a 105W TDP part, so depending on what size radiator you have, you may end up with pretty slow fan speeds in a 4000D

 

Is it odd if my fluid temp is reading at 24c all the time, and when I run cinebench and loop it for like 5 minutes it might go up to 25c? I feel like that is low and it should fluctuate once under some kind of load/ when the cpu heats up?

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It depends on your loop. if you have short tubes, one 120mm radiator and the tiniest pump/res, it will warm up faster, because less water to heat up.

 

If you use a Corsair kit with a 360mm rad, an XD5 pump, all that to cool off just a 3800x, it will take a while to heat up all that water, with 3 fans cooling it at the same time.

To reach steady state you may have to let cinebench rip for like 30 minutes or more.

Water temp never spikes, not even slowly. it's very gradual. That's why watercooling is so efficient at cooling spiky loads like gaming. It's very hard to warm up water (high specific heat if you want to doodle wikipedia ^^)

 

Try it out on Cinebench R23 stability test. it runs for 30 minutes. you should see more action.

 

Edit: i also forgot.. the motherboard temp sensor, from what i remember only displays integers, no decimals. so it may look very static but it changes slowly.

Edited by LeDoyen
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No, that would not be out of the ordinary, especially if this is a multiple radiator system. It's the wattage rather than the CPU temperature that will increase coolant. See if you can get a read on how much your 3800x uses for the R23(?) run. However, my maxed out 10900K will pull 240W (definitely much more than you will see) and with the fans relaxed it will take 5 minutes to go up 2C. Water systems are high capable even in low fan/pump speed states. This is one of the primary advantages over air cooling.

 

You sometimes can reduce CPU temps a couple of degrees with high pump speed during max load to minimize fluid time in the CPU block. However, if you are running a short loop of CPU+XD5+ 1 radiator, you probably have very high flow rate even at moderate pump speeds. You won't have a lot of resistance. This is really only something of concern if you run max CPU loads for long durations. For most normal users reducing CPU temp by 2C in exchange for maximum pump noise is not a great trade.

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Okay sounds good ill try out R23 for a while and see what happens I just feel like 24c is like too cold for the liquid temp and some kind of error, but I am running a 360 rad and full xd5 pump/res in a 4000d case so the runs aren't short.

 

Also was wondering if my idle temps are abnormally high, on Idle I am at mid 40's to low 50's like 45c-52c. Online I see people getting temps in the mid 30C range? that's like a 50% increase in some cases.

 

I have PBO on so idk if it is just using the extra headroom to crank up the voltage and heating the cpu up on idle but it seems high. however on cinebench 5 minute run it got to 68c flattened out and didn't go above which I feel like is pretty good. Anyone have similar results or for some more experienced are those temps oaky?/could be better.

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You are not going to idle at 30C with Ryzen 3000 series. It responds to everything going and it will keep the CPU active. The days of the CPU sitting flat at 700 Mhz are gone. Either way, it makes your idle CPU temp directly related to the programs installed and running (active or background) and not dependent on the cooling. At idle there is little wattage to dissipate so coolant will stay low, but the voltage is being applied and removed at rapid frequency and thus the CPU bounces all around. On the bright side, most are not really using power in this state and that is not cut off below the monitoring level you can see.

 

I don't have any of the new Zen systems, so I can't comment on where it should be on load but if you are maxing out at 68C you would seem to be in good shape.

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Okay sounds good ill try out R23 for a while and see what happens I just feel like 24c is like too cold for the liquid temp and some kind of error, but I am running a 360 rad and full xd5 pump/res in a 4000d case so the runs aren't short.

 

Also was wondering if my idle temps are abnormally high, on Idle I am at mid 40's to low 50's like 45c-52c. Online I see people getting temps in the mid 30C range? that's like a 50% increase in some cases.

 

I have PBO on so idk if it is just using the extra headroom to crank up the voltage and heating the cpu up on idle but it seems high. however on cinebench 5 minute run it got to 68c flattened out and didn't go above which I feel like is pretty good. Anyone have similar results or for some more experienced are those temps oaky?/could be better.

 

What is your ambient temp? If it's 24C then yes likely the 24C coolant temp is wrong, but if it's 20C with only a cpu in the loop, then it's probably correct. I have 2 rads, 360 and 280. Even at full load on my 5800x, it barely budges the coolant temp. 1 to 2C.

 

I control my EK pump from the bios. Works fine. You can also use Argus Monitor to control the pump and fans from Win. Speedfan is also an option but I couldn't get it to work with my mobo (Gig Aorus x570).

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