Jump to content
Corsair Community

Hydro X Loop - Coolant temp concerns


mayatola
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello,

New to the forums but been a pretty big fan of Corsair products for the last few years. I just recently put together a custom loop using Hydro X parts as I finally managed to buy a 3090 with a waterblock (Aorus 3090 Xtreme Waterforce). While it's not the first loop that I put together (I helped a friend build his 3900X/2080Ti system and then set up a Hydro X loop for it in his O11D XL), I am still a newcomer to custom watercooling, even though I have spent dozens of hours researching it. While I'm really happy with how my loop turned out, I'm a bit concerned about the coolant temperature.

 

System:

i9-9900k, RTX 3090, Corsair 500D RGB SE case

 

Cooling:

XD3 (DDC), XC5 (CPU block), 360 rad, 240 rad, 5 LL120 fans

 

With that setup and the GPU undervolted to 868mV at 1860MHz (no CPU overclock), my coolant temp still reaches upward of 50-52C! I have the fans set to max out at 1550RPM which is around 85% (when I set fans to 100%, they reach around 1750RPM), and ambient temp at night when I can play is around 29-30C (my wife likes to keep the heater on at night since our kids sleep with us - hence why I have to keep fan speeds at 1550RPM as any higher and I risk waking them). So I guess when you consider ambient temp and coolant max temp, the delta is over 20C which I have heard is pretty unacceptable for water cooling (most users that I've read have posted that 10-15C above ambient is what should be acceptable, but under 10 is ideal).

 

Now I'm not a snob about temperature, but I have read (and also saw on the Corsair spec page) that the max operating temp of the DDC and D5 is 60C. While I haven't reached it yet, I see that my coolant temp keeps creeping up as I continue to game. I don't see it peaking somewhere and stop climbing (it only stops when I'm in a menu crafting or on the map screen, playing Cyberpunk 2077 mostly right now). At least at around 50C it does seem to be climbing slower, but again, it's climbing, and in a lot of posts that I've read, users seem to freak out at other users posting coolant temps at 45C or above. I'm not using PETG tubing (which I've heard can deform and cause leaks); I'm using soft tubing, and of course if I went hard tube, I would use the Corsair line (PMMA), but I'm still a bit worried about the rest of the loop. Is coolant temp above 50C a cause for concern?

 

As far as component temps, my CPU seems to top out at 70C (averaging 65C most of the time) while the GPU averages around 50C (sometimes reaching 54C). So the components themselves being cooled are well below any cause for concern, but again, I just keep reading from others that coolant this high is bad.

 

For those that have loops with Hydro X, are you maxing your LL120 fan speeds? Are you using the preset Hydro X Fan curve in iCUE? Is there any other way of controlling the pump speed in iCUE? It only seems to speed up noticeably at 50C coolant temp. Should I be looking at getting another case perhaps? I do want to go with the 5000D Airflow, but then adding another 360 rad and fan on top might get a bit pricey and upset my wife.

 

I'm just wondering if I should be concerned or what I should do. I thought undervolting the 3090 would be enough, but the coolant temp still keeps climbing. Would love to hear your thoughts on this, and thanks so much for reading.

111946682_202117.thumb.JPEG.94e8d88526ac02aa047670f37161de7a.JPEG

609089552_20217.thumb.JPEG.85da115172bbec1bcf9992d4b2ed814d.JPEG

1821429997_202116.thumb.JPEG.1fe335e0e05d17c62fe24fe2b9ede404.JPEG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you can set any rpm curve to your pump in the performance tab of the Commander Pro. just create a new profile and apply it to the pump, using the temperature sensor as control variable, in the dropdown list.

 

the 3090 warms up the water VERY quickly so if you have a slow pump speed it will reach over 50 very fast. I only ever used D5 pumps, but found the sweet spot to be between 60 - 70%.

 

Some also run their fans as all exhaust, or all intake, to avoid dumping the heat from one radiator to the other, rendering that one a lot less efficient. You can also add a fan on the case's back position to help getting air in, for all rads exhaust, and vice versa. (if you do all exhaust, you can get rid of dust filters too, that will help with airflow).

People who use that case will be able to help on how it works best, there's a big topic about the 500D.

Your ambient temp is really warm, but i'm sure there's way to reduce that delta T.

 

You shouldn't have to undervolt anything when going custom loop. You paid the big bucks to be able to do the opposite :p

  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you so much. For some reason I thought that I could only change the fan curves in iCUE. I just created a pump curve for the XD3 and my god, I finally got rid of that horrible whiny noise at idle. The default minimum RPM for the pump is 2100, and it created this really whiny sound that is really irritating (I considered returning it, but decided that I really didn't want to redo my loop again). But now with the minimum set to 2400RPM in my new curve, the pump noise blends in with the fans and I can't notice it at all. That alone is of huge benefit to me so thank you thank you thank you so much for that!

 

I will be testing higher pump speeds at lower coolant temps to see if I can finally stop the coolant from climbing while maintaining lower noise levels for my family. I think that right now I might have a good place to start (50% max at idle and 70% max at medium temps), so hopefully this will be enough to fix my problem without having to buy more stuff. Thank you again!

 

Also, I am considering fan arrangement like all exhaust, but I hope it won't come to that as I like the current aesthetic, and I don't want to drain and redo the loop if I don't have to. I will search for that 500D topic.

 

Haha, yeah I wish I could spend more time tinkering with overclocking rather than undervolting. Hopefully just a more aggressive pump speed will let me go in that direction next! Thanks again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the joys of soft tubing, you don't have to drain everything to flip fans if you're careful enough :)

 

If you get a good fan/pump speed profile done you can already get to a good point i believe. the case is used a lot with watercooling. Maybe adding an exhaust fan will help dump heat outside without passing to the top rad.

 

After looking at your loop, what's scary is that the pump receives water after the rads (which is best practice to keep the pump cooled).. so you are measuring "cool" water. depending on pump speed you probably had water close to 60 hitting the first radiator

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hm, I checked out that 500D RGB SE thread and there doesn't seem to be much in the way of custom water cooling configuration. In any case, ramping the pump up to even 3900RPM (which is around 80%) is still not solving my issue. It seems to help slightly with slowing down the rise in temperature, but damn, this is out of control. So LL120 fans need to go to 100% or bust? I even got my wife to lower the heater in the room. This is really getting depressing.

 

Also regarding the coolant temp, I think the pump is moving the liquid too fast for there to be such a temperature difference even on the other side of the loop. Still, it doesn't make me feel any better. I just put a finger on the tubes and they are pretty warm. I touched a couple of the fittings and they are pretty damned warm, almost hot to the touch. Ugh, I don't want to flip the fans but I'm not really ready to buy even more stuff yet.

Edited by mayatola
Link to comment
Share on other sites

there's no perceptible temperature difference between "hot" and "cold" water in normal operation even under load.

those of us who fitted sensors before and after the radiators see a difference of 1 or 2 degrees at BEST.

The trick is as water warms up, radiators become more efficient at transferring heat (because of the difference between ambient air passing through the fins and fins themselves). so the water temp will stabilize under load and stop raising, but the temperature differences in the loop will remain very minimal.

 

really seems from what you say that your rads are struggling to get air. maybe start by taking filters out. you should feel some wind behind the radiators, not just a vague heat pocket coming off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think this is a fan speed issue. Your ambient is about the same as mine in Summer and with a XD3 + 2x360 I would max out around 39C on the coolant. With the GPU restrained it may only be pulling 280-300W and possibly less if using DLSS in some recent games. The 9900 should only be about 80-100W during gaming, so in total you are under 400W. That should not produce a +20-22C coolant increase.

 

The front radiator exhausting into the top does make it close to non-effective, but even if you had just a 360mm the expected coolant delta for 300W is about +11C @1300 rpm. So we don't get to 50C coolant even with a single radiator and 400W.

 

The thing I am wondering about is interior case temps. It looks like front rad in/top rad out and those are the only air movers. It is possible the case itself continues to warm during extended gaming and of course elevates all temps along with it. How does your coolant temp compare to something like the MB temp? If you are using a Commander Pro, can you run one of the thermistors into the middle of the case and compare?

 

Another way to go at this is run a CPU only stress test. It can be something basic like CPU-Z bench that is fixed. We want the Watts, not really the strenuous stability check. If there is a flow problem, this will show it too. 9900K overclocked on CPU-Z should be about 200W. That's enough to move coolant about 4-6C in 5-10 min. If you see something like +10C, we know there is some type of fundamental flow issue. This test is not going to heat up the case much at all, so it is another way to separate that out.

  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

really seems from what you say that your rads are struggling to get air. maybe start by taking filters out. you should feel some wind behind the radiators, not just a vague heat pocket coming off.

 

I do feel air being pushed through the rads for sure even with the filters on. With some additional testing which I will detail below, it does look like the fans are struggling though.

 

I don't think this is a fan speed issue. Your ambient is about the same as mine in Summer and with a XD3 + 2x360 I would max out around 39C on the coolant. With the GPU restrained it may only be pulling 280-300W and possibly less if using DLSS in some recent games. The 9900 should only be about 80-100W during gaming, so in total you are under 400W. That should not produce a +20-22C coolant increase.

 

The front radiator exhausting into the top does make it close to non-effective, but even if you had just a 360mm the expected coolant delta for 300W is about +11C @1300 rpm. So we don't get to 50C coolant even with a single radiator and 400W.

 

The thing I am wondering about is interior case temps. It looks like front rad in/top rad out and those are the only air movers. It is possible the case itself continues to warm during extended gaming and of course elevates all temps along with it. How does your coolant temp compare to something like the MB temp? If you are using a Commander Pro, can you run one of the thermistors into the middle of the case and compare?

 

Another way to go at this is run a CPU only stress test. It can be something basic like CPU-Z bench that is fixed. We want the Watts, not really the strenuous stability check. If there is a flow problem, this will show it too. 9900K overclocked on CPU-Z should be about 200W. That's enough to move coolant about 4-6C in 5-10 min. If you see something like +10C, we know there is some type of fundamental flow issue. This test is not going to heat up the case much at all, so it is another way to separate that out.

 

Thank you so much for your suggestion. So what I did was just download CPU-Z and try out the stress test. From what I can tell, my CPU is pulling 120-125W at full load at stock (no overclock and I don't overclock for daily use or gaming anyway). After about 20 minutes, the coolant went from 30C at idle to about 38.5C. With my current fan curve (1200RPM @ 35C, 1400RPM @ 40C, 1550RPM @ 45C), it wouldn't stop the coolant from rising (since the RPM at this curve was around 1350). Now I just set all of the fans to a set 85% which is 1550RPM (what my fans would max at when reaching 45C), and only now did the coolant temps stop rising. After about 10 more minutes, it has dropped to 37.8C while the stress test is still running. With my GPU idling at around 25W, the heat load looks like around 150W.

 

I hope that's just due to weaker efficiency below a certain temperature, because that seems crazy that it takes this much to stop 150W from climbing out of control. I thought custom water cooling was supposed to be quieter than air cooling. I mean if I was cooling the entire system at load at this noise level, I'd be fine with it, but this just for the CPU alone (and GPU idle)... Anyway, I will try to test further with the temperature probes tonight. As of completing this post, it's been 40 minutes total and yes, the coolant stopped and is holding at 37.8C with the stress test still running.

 

I will place probes tonight in the middle of the case, at the intake, and maybe another in the exhaust just to see.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

+8°C with just CPU stress test that's mad...

I hate LL and QL fans with a passion so i won't comment further on how they perform ^^ but i personally believe that could be part of your problem.

 

Closed up front, filter, and rad, that calls for high static pressure fans.

There's ways to work around it, but i don't have experience with this case so i'm out ^^

 

With ~260W load (moderate 3D on GPU and cinebench looped on CPU), turning off fans on one of my 360, i get a +4°C raise in water temp, at 1200 rpm. That's just to illustrate what your radiators are capable of on their own. 360 + 240 is more than enough to cool what's in your build, in silence.

 

I would still add an exhaust fan though. if you have one lounging about, any model, i"d connect it to help those front fans pull air through.. or just exhaust more warm air out and not let it all pass through the top rad.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have both radiators equipped with filters, that might be the thing to check next. A radiator + filter is a lot of resistance for any fan, but perhaps too much for one not optimized for radiator duty. They are going to be a penalty either way.

 

Thank you, I decided to remove the dust filter for the exhaust as it never made sense to me. Every time I remove it, it never has any dust to clean. I think it may have made a difference, at least when I got to game a bit during the day. Will try later tonight to see if it still holds up.

 

+8°C with just CPU stress test that's mad...

I hate LL and QL fans with a passion so i won't comment further on how they perform ^^ but i personally believe that could be part of your problem.

 

With ~260W load (moderate 3D on GPU and cinebench looped on CPU), turning off fans on one of my 360, i get a +4°C raise in water temp, at 1200 rpm. That's just to illustrate what your radiators are capable of on their own. 360 + 240 is more than enough to cool what's in your build, in silence.

 

I have heard a lot of mixed things regarding the LL and QL fans. In my experience they aren't the best, but usually have been "passable" for the most part. I am leaning on the side of feeling like they are inadequate right now, but part of why I like Corsair products is the mix of aesthetics and being able to control them in iCUE via the Commander Pro. I have tried unsuccessfully in the past to replace stock AIO fans with fans from other brands like be quiet! or Noctua. They generally didn't play nice when it came to software control (I think I tried be quiet! fans on NZXT AIO and that didn't work - I think I read that they don't use the same PWM signal). edit: So I checked your specs and see you are using EK fans in the O11D XL. How are you controlling them? I think my case and fans are definitely holding me back. Seriously considering changing the case to 5000D Airflow and populating with Arctic P12 fans. Maybe go hard tube too.

 

Anyway, since it's the weekend, I actually had a chance to game during the day. Before I started, I placed the temp sensors and connected them to the Commander Pro. One was placed near the intake to measure the ambient air going in, while another was placed almost directly in the center of the case. The last sensor I placed on top of the exhaust. I played for about an hour (with very few pauses so as not to let the system cool down) so hopefully it's a good indicator of how the system is cooling since it should have reached max temp or equilibrium or whatever.

 

Average system power draw: 390W (measured by OSD in Afterburner with the undervolt)

 

Idle baseline

Coolant: 29C

Intake: 23C

Internal: 27C

Exhaust: 28C

 

After 60 minutes

Coolant: 44.87C

Intake: 24.75C

Internal: 37.96C

Exhaust: 40.89C

 

I believe the coolant never hit 45C, but the coolant is still +20C above the intake. I guess I'm just happy that the temperature stopped climbing after around 40 minutes. At night, I'm just used to seeing it climb and climb until I take a short break to let it cool down. Hopefully tonight it will do the same and I can put this to rest.

 

Will attach some pics to show where I placed the sensors. If you think I should move, please let me know.

case.thumb.JPEG.e342884ed97ed4e026c610c3a8fe8c34.JPEG

t2.thumb.JPEG.e89c23e996bb379b85f51c18a800ce34.JPEG

t3.thumb.JPEG.2687bdeea7733cfc984ff9c6c3e3cb75.JPEG

t4.thumb.JPEG.1c69a7354348cc81b21a26bac9dce4b0.JPEG

928276926_60mins.thumb.png.df241c03c971ff7db0ad8d65bef43d40.png

Edited by mayatola
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ugh, in the planning stages of going 5000D Airflow and a couple of five packs of Arctic P12's. Think the days of front glass panels and RGB fans are finished for me. Taking off the top dust filter did help, but it's not really enough. I think the coolant temp finally stopped climbing after about 35 minutes, but it still topped out at just above 50C. Nearly 22C above ambient...

 

Heat load was between 405-420W as I found a nice spot in game where my CPU is pushing 70-80% utilization. Starting ambient and coolant was 27C and 33C, and after 35 minutes, it appeared to stabilize at 28C ambient (room warmed up slightly) and 50C. Case internal temp went from 31C to 42C. My wife is using the heater now sure, but it's still cooler than what our room feels like in the summer. No way my system will survive like this. Maybe with a 2080 Ti it was fine, but now, there's just no chance.

 

I'm pretty sure flipping the front to exhaust and removing that dust filter will make a difference, but I just don't want to use the case that way. I think I'm going to sell it instead.

 

Still would appreciate hearing your thoughts, but I think I've made up my mind. Maybe go hardline tubing while I'm at it. But definitely going side and top exhaust with unobstructed front intake.

starting.thumb.png.5907a918d2665bb68b3e7e348aa25431.png

247268641_35mins.thumb.png.ffccd35da7177bc013db7b9a9a0c022b.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have heard a lot of mixed things regarding the LL and QL fans. In my experience they aren't the best, but usually have been "passable" for the most part. I am leaning on the side of feeling like they are inadequate right now, but part of why I like Corsair products is the mix of aesthetics and being able to control them in iCUE via the Commander Pro. I have tried unsuccessfully in the past to replace stock AIO fans with fans from other brands like be quiet! or Noctua. They generally didn't play nice when it came to software control (I think I tried be quiet! fans on NZXT AIO and that didn't work - I think I read that they don't use the same PWM signal). edit: So I checked your specs and see you are using EK fans in the O11D XL. How are you controlling them? I think my case and fans are definitely holding me back. Seriously considering changing the case to 5000D Airflow and populating with Arctic P12 fans. Maybe go hard tube too.

 

I control everything with an Aquacomputer Octo controller. I used to have a full corsair build in a 680x, with LL fans, Commander pro, and all, but i wasn't happy with the noise it made running the fans so high to cool it, but the biggest problem was iCUE CPU load that was creating constant stuttering in games. So in the end i ditched all my corsair gear except the power supply which is the only piece of gear that performed according to its price.

I also got over RGB craziness and only mostly use simple effects, one color.

 

HD fans work a bit better if you stay Corsair, but still far from ideal.

I tested the Arctic P12 and they perform basically the same as the EK, just a bit more noisy at high speeds as they have no frame dampening. Case opened, i feel the airflow on me from 3' away, they push air even at moderate speed (and these can run scary slow, like 300 rpm, you can watch the logo spin it's funny).

 

That said, if you go 5000D, you could totally keep the LL fans for front intake. They work really wel as case fans. they are just bad at radiator duty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I control everything with an Aquacomputer Octo controller. I used to have a full corsair build in a 680x, with LL fans, Commander pro, and all, but i wasn't happy with the noise it made running the fans so high to cool it, but the biggest problem was iCUE CPU load that was creating constant stuttering in games. So in the end i ditched all my corsair gear except the power supply which is the only piece of gear that performed according to its price.

I also got over RGB craziness and only mostly use simple effects, one color.

 

I really get you there. I'm starting to feel like I don't need the RGB anymore either. I really like the effects but they're kinda useless if I'm too afraid to use my system to its potential because it's overheating. I mean for now it's kinda okay, but summer, I doubt it.

 

I'm even having doubts about the 5000D. Watched der8auer's video where he did a build with the case, and it just looks like running out of space is a problem. edit: I think I've changed my mind on this as well, but I should probably just give myself some time to think things through.

Edited by mayatola
Link to comment
Share on other sites

der8auer sometimes misses stuff ^^

he didn't know the EK key was designed to break at a certain torque to avoid overtightening, and didn't notice the QR code on the EK boxes to get the installation manuals etc.. we was a bit Jayztwocents on that review. Also you'd have a 240mm up top so that leaves you a ton of space to put the fittings where you like.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Temp sensors can go anywhere. There is no exact coordinate it should be and once you start taking data, it's better to leave them exactly where they are unless there is a problem. Moving a sensor end by 2-3cm can shift the temp reading by several degrees. It's best to leave them where they are for consistency, until you are no longer making comparative runs.

 

LL/QL fans were not designed to be optimum radiator fans, but they are more than passable. I am also running a O11 XL and I have configured it in every possible way with two and three 360mm radiators. Currently I am running two as exhaust with QL fans. A 10900K@5.2 and 2080Ti on a 400W VBIOS will give me an average wattage load of 435-500W on heavier games. I get all cranky when my coolant hits 33C, or +12C above ambient. I do not run my QL fans past 1300. This holds true in Summer as well when the room gets to be 27-28C in the evening and coolant stops just under 40C. I am only one 120x120 amount of radiator surface better off, so clearly there must be something else that is different.

 

 

 

T

Idle baseline

Coolant: 29C

Intake: 23C

Internal: 27C

Exhaust: 28C

 

After 60 minutes

Coolant: 44.87C

Intake: 24.75C

Internal: 37.96C

Exhaust: 40.89C

 

 

I think the answer to that is in the ambient temp increases and I believe to be from a general lack of airflow through the case. A radiator is a serious impediment to airflow. It varies by type and fan, but essentially you are getting about half of what the fan could do in free air. The exhaust air temp from your front radiator is approximately equal to the coolant temp passing through it. In effect, you are blowing 40-45C air at the other radiator and everything else in the case. Compare this to my +3C typical ambient rise during a gaming load. This is where you are loosing all your ground and it some ways the cycle feeds itself heat. As the coolant keeps warming, you keep blowing even warmer air back to the interior. This is why it keeps escalating during the entire session, whereas mine will level off in about 5-10 minutes.

 

The easiest, most effective change I can suggest is to flip the front fans around to exhaust. This solves a couple of issues. 1) No more radiators feeding each other heat. 2) With both radiators as exhaust, they will now pull unheated outside air in through the back of the case. This will help with component temps on the MB and also stop the ambient warming. The only thing to watch out for here is you don't want the back of the case up against the heating vent, but even so it still might be better than the current situation. That +10C increase in internal ambient is the exact extra amount of coolant rise over what was expected.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

der8auer sometimes misses stuff ^^

he didn't know the EK key was designed to break at a certain torque to avoid overtightening, and didn't notice the QR code on the EK boxes to get the installation manuals etc.. we was a bit Jayztwocents on that review. Also you'd have a 240mm up top so that leaves you a ton of space to put the fittings where you like.

 

Der8auer's problem was with a G1/4 plug that had been torqued too tight at the factory; he broke two keys trying to remove it. That said, I received one of those keys with my RTX 3090 waterblock but still use my metal Allen keys and am vigilant not to overtighten.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep you're totally right. Well these keys are mostly done for tightening, to avoid overtightening. to unscrew, there's nothing like "too much force" ^^

These plugs do stick when installed for more than 5 minutes, as soon as they dried.

 

I personally only use them for the reservoir fill plug, and a vent on top of the loop. They are very handy to install tube fittings too (silly 9mm hex...).

If you're not a mechanical barbarian, you have no need for this key anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Appreciate the feedback, thanks so much. I think I'm going to try flipping the front fans to exhaust as suggested. I might also do a test run with the side door open since I can't remove the front panel. Will post update whenever I get a chance to do these things. Thanks again.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

der8auer sometimes misses stuff ^^

he didn't know the EK key was designed to break at a certain torque to avoid overtightening, and didn't notice the QR code on the EK boxes to get the installation manuals etc.. we was a bit Jayztwocents on that review. Also you'd have a 240mm up top so that leaves you a ton of space to put the fittings where you like.

 

I was planning to get another 360 to take full advantage of the larger case and probably give the 240 to my brother, but I should just slow down and do more testing before I get anything else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the answer to that is in the ambient temp increases and I believe to be from a general lack of airflow through the case. A radiator is a serious impediment to airflow. It varies by type and fan, but essentially you are getting about half of what the fan could do in free air. The exhaust air temp from your front radiator is approximately equal to the coolant temp passing through it. In effect, you are blowing 40-45C air at the other radiator and everything else in the case. Compare this to my +3C typical ambient rise during a gaming load. This is where you are loosing all your ground and it some ways the cycle feeds itself heat. As the coolant keeps warming, you keep blowing even warmer air back to the interior. This is why it keeps escalating during the entire session, whereas mine will level off in about 5-10 minutes.

 

The easiest, most effective change I can suggest is to flip the front fans around to exhaust. This solves a couple of issues. 1) No more radiators feeding each other heat. 2) With both radiators as exhaust, they will now pull unheated outside air in through the back of the case. This will help with component temps on the MB and also stop the ambient warming. The only thing to watch out for here is you don't want the back of the case up against the heating vent, but even so it still might be better than the current situation. That +10C increase in internal ambient is the exact extra amount of coolant rise over what was expected.

 

Yes, I did more testing and that is the problem. Removing the front dust filter didn't really do anything, but opening the side door helped lower the case and coolant by 5 degrees. I'm quite certain that flipping the fans will provide even better results since the fans wouldn't still be pushing hot air in the wrong direction. Also, after playing around with Corsair's "Design your loop" and downloading the reference builds, I noticed that they are all negative pressure exhaust everywhere with the rear of the case serving as intake. The first time I saw these build guides, I didn't understand, but now it obviously makes sense. It's just that whenever I saw builds on youtube (even Corsair's own channel), it's always rads in front with fans as intake and rad on top with fans as exhaust. And then the reference guide is the opposite for the front rad (and also opposite in terms of the advertised "air flow design" of the case). I guess that's why I built it backwards in the first place.

 

I looked at my build and unfortunately there is no way to flip the fans without draining the loop, so I will take it apart and set up the fans in the correct orientation. I will post back when I have results. Thanks again to all for your input.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Took apart my loop and redid some runs while flipping the fans on the front rad. Looks a bit off seeing a radiator through my front glass panel (kinda defeats the purpose), but I never thought I would water cool in this case. Anyway after 30 minutes of 400W with an ambient temp of 26-27C, the case went from 29C to 33C, and the coolant peaked at 43C. The fans still reached 1500RPM, but the noise is acceptable for me and this seems to be the best I can achieve in this case. Not the best by far, but I will keep this until I change my build in a couple of years. By then I will definitely buy a new case that is better suited to a custom loop. Or I dunno, maybe by then I'll actually figure out what I'm doing. Thanks guys.

174969841_202114.thumb.JPEG.81749cd29c9aa92f09d5362e5d2cea1b.JPEG

1656829142_202115.thumb.JPEG.ab4b676df02a9d9b8842284fc0de5eb7.JPEG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you could have kept the fans on the glass side :) they work the same in this orientation (provided the long screws are long enough to take the fan and the mounting plate thickness).

 

I thought of it, but I don't really like the look of the LL fans from the rear. I just rotated my case a bit so that I see through the side panel more than the front ;):

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's just that whenever I saw builds on youtube (even Corsair's own channel), it's always rads in front with fans as intake and rad on top with fans as exhaust. And then the reference guide is the opposite for the front rad (and also opposite in terms of the advertised "air flow design" of the case). I guess that's why I built it backwards in the first place.

 

And here we are the current crossroads of case design. We full water cooling people are a small percentage. Most standard towers were designed for air cooling. If you only had one radiator, you put it as front intake and let the heat blow through out the top with active exhaust. If you can remove the heat blowing off the radiator from the case easily, then intake radiators will get you better performance. It's when you can't that causes issues. It's really hard to make it work like that in medium tower and probably why I have gravitated to the odd shape cases for the past 15 years.

 

An example of this might be the 5000x. You can (hopefully) run intake 360mm radiators on the front and side slots, then freely exhaust it out the top. That's not the only possible configuration, but that is the general idea. It's the two radiator build in the medium tower that gets tricky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...