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Fan RPM for Hydro series H150i RGB PRO XT


Zyder
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Hi i just installed the above AIO on my system (Ryzen 5800X)

 

is it normal to have about 1900rpm for the 3 fans and pump at 2355rpm in balance mode? Coolant temp is 33 degree but am not gaming, just watching netflix. I am based in Asia and my room temp is about 30 degree.

 

As soon as i on my air conditioning and set my room temp to 23 degree the fan rpm go all the way down to 600-800rpm while pump rpm is still the same.

 

is this normal? Sorry as this is my first AIO :p:

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Go to the Performance tab and click +. That will create a new custom curve and reveal a graph below. In the top right corner are three shape tools that correspond to the Quiet/Balanced/Extreme presets. Pick Quiet or Balanced as a starting place, make sure the sensor value at the bottom is set to H150i XT Temp (coolant temperature) , and then click on all 3 fans above to apply the new curve.

 

Since lowest possible coolant is essentially your internal case temp, we will all have different values before we even start talking about hardware. It’s impossible to make a universal preset. The ones there use a 20-23C baseline and that will be too low for many people during at least part of the year.

 

The quick and easy way to do this is note the current coolant while sitting on the desktop (not directly after extended load). That is your approximate baseline. You won’t get lower with changing room/case temp. Set that to a quiet, comfortable speed, maybe something like 750 rpm. You have a 360mm radiator. It takes continuous, high wattage loads to effect coolant temp. You can leave the first part of the graph relatively flat so that speeds don’t shift around at +-1C all the time. Also, +-1C is also the relationship between coolant temp and cpu temp. Coolant temp is the baseline or lowest possible cpu temp at 0v Vcore. There’s no need for a fan response to reduce your cpu temp by 1C.

 

For load you will likely need to see where things top out at and then set a reasonable fan speed for that temperature. Most people will see higher coolant temps in mixed loads like gaming because of the gpu waste heat effect on case temperature. You can’t really work around that, so set your fan speed accordingly. 1300 rpm is usually enough and where things start to become clearly noticeable. There is no magic formula for temp X = fan speed Y and small differences in fan speed will not change temperature beyond tenths of a degree. Always use your ears to decide on whether it is appropriate.

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Go to the Performance tab and click +. That will create a new custom curve and reveal a graph below. In the top right corner are three shape tools that correspond to the Quiet/Balanced/Extreme presets. Pick Quiet or Balanced as a starting place, make sure the sensor value at the bottom is set to H150i XT Temp (coolant temperature) , and then click on all 3 fans above to apply the new curve.

 

Since lowest possible coolant is essentially your internal case temp, we will all have different values before we even start talking about hardware. It’s impossible to make a universal preset. The ones there use a 20-23C baseline and that will be too low for many people during at least part of the year.

 

The quick and easy way to do this is note the current coolant while sitting on the desktop (not directly after extended load). That is your approximate baseline. You won’t get lower with changing room/case temp. Set that to a quiet, comfortable speed, maybe something like 750 rpm. You have a 360mm radiator. It takes continuous, high wattage loads to effect coolant temp. You can leave the first part of the graph relatively flat so that speeds don’t shift around at +-1C all the time. Also, +-1C is also the relationship between coolant temp and cpu temp. Coolant temp is the baseline or lowest possible cpu temp at 0v Vcore. There’s no need for a fan response to reduce your cpu temp by 1C.

 

For load you will likely need to see where things top out at and then set a reasonable fan speed for that temperature. Most people will see higher coolant temps in mixed loads like gaming because of the gpu waste heat effect on case temperature. You can’t really work around that, so set your fan speed accordingly. 1300 rpm is usually enough and where things start to become clearly noticeable. There is no magic formula for temp X = fan speed Y and small differences in fan speed will not change temperature beyond tenths of a degree. Always use your ears to decide on whether it is appropriate.

 

Thanks for your reply, sorry i am very new to this, lets said my coolant temp is about 32 degree how should i plot the graph pls? Also the sensor should be the aio cooler right?

should the graph be apply to the pump too? Or should i let it remain under "balance"

 

thanks alot for yoru time c-attack!

Edited by Zyder
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The sensor should be the AIO/Coolant temperature. It is usually referred to by it's model number in the drop down menu (H150i XT Temp or similar).

 

If the coolant temp sits around 30-32C at the desktop, that is your baseline. Set a quiet fan speed for 30C like 750 rpm. Make a second point at 33C for the same speed to keep it from jumping around at the desktop level. Then slowly ramp up. I would guess you get to 40C coolant temp during longer loads, especially something with GPU activity. Set a tolerable speed for 40C. It probably should be somewhere between 1000-1300 rpm.

 

All of this is room temperature based and you will see shifts as the climate changes during the year. If you dropped the same PC into a 15C room, you wouldn't even get to the bottom of the default curves.

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The sensor should be the AIO/Coolant temperature. It is usually referred to by it's model number in the drop down menu (H150i XT Temp or similar).

 

If the coolant temp sits around 30-32C at the desktop, that is your baseline. Set a quiet fan speed for 30C like 750 rpm. Make a second point at 33C for the same speed to keep it from jumping around at the desktop level. Then slowly ramp up. I would guess you get to 40C coolant temp during longer loads, especially something with GPU activity. Set a tolerable speed for 40C. It probably should be somewhere between 1000-1300 rpm.

 

All of this is room temperature based and you will see shifts as the climate changes during the year. If you dropped the same PC into a 15C room, you wouldn't even get to the bottom of the default curves.

Should the pump be set to the custom curve too?

 

Sorry, in the graph i can only see temperature and % of load, but no rpm :confused: am i missing something?

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No, I don't have an XT and forgot that line uses PWM %. Your fans are 2400 rpm max. You just need to turn RPM into PWM %. 1200/2400 rpm = 50 % PWM. It's not always quite so linear, but you can use the fixed % setting to figure out exact values.

 

Corsair AIO pumps cannot be set to custom speeds. Those fan presets also double as pump presets, but with different values. Quiet is probably around 1900-2000 rpm. Balanced somewhere near 2400. Extreme ~2700-2800. Pump speed does not have a very large effect on AIO systems. The length of the system is short and the cooling channels in the block are not overly restrictive. You can probably leave it on Quiet all the time or flip it up when under long sustained load to see if it makes any difference.

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Yes, it's on the right side of the pump picture. Typical range for coolant temp is 20-45C or more specifically your room temp or baseline +10C. Anytime you see coolant temps go above 45C, you need to figure out why. There is nothing particularly dangerous about 46 or 47C, but when you get to that point you likely will running into the CPU temp limit on the processor. At 50C coolant temp, even an underclocked processor would be in the 80s when at load.
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Coolant temp is the baseline or lowest possible CPU temp when the voltage is off or reduced to near zero. Heat is transferred both ways across the block, so if I ran 35C water past a CPU that was 30C, it would warm up to 35C fairly quickly.

 

Your end CPU temp is always going to be dancing around as voltage is applied and removed. However, you can calculate your Coolant to CPU differential. Take a fixed load stress test like the Bench Test in CPU-Z. Note your coolant temp. Start the test. You only need to run it for 5 seconds. Note the peak CPU temp. The difference between coolant and that peak CPU temp is the differential. That factor doesn't have anything to do with the cooling system. It is a function of CPU materials, conductivity, and CPU design. However, it gives you max possible coolant temp for your personal limit. So if I don't want my CPU temp to go above 85C and my Coolant to CPU differential is +40C, then I know I can't let the coolant get past 45C.

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Coolant temp is the baseline or lowest possible CPU temp when the voltage is off or reduced to near zero. Heat is transferred both ways across the block, so if I ran 35C water past a CPU that was 30C, it would warm up to 35C fairly quickly.

 

Your end CPU temp is always going to be dancing around as voltage is applied and removed. However, you can calculate your Coolant to CPU differential. Take a fixed load stress test like the Bench Test in CPU-Z. Note your coolant temp. Start the test. You only need to run it for 5 seconds. Note the peak CPU temp. The difference between coolant and that peak CPU temp is the differential. That factor doesn't have anything to do with the cooling system. It is a function of CPU materials, conductivity, and CPU design. However, it gives you max possible coolant temp for your personal limit. So if I don't want my CPU temp to go above 85C and my Coolant to CPU differential is +40C, then I know I can't let the coolant get past 45C.

Thanks! :D:
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It’s hard to say on coolant, except to compare the current difference in coolant to cpu temp while gaming to that max value from the stress test. The problem is some games are just stupid and may maximally load the cpu for a second here or there and artificially boost the peak.

 

Fan speed is a little easier to answer. Keep them reasonable. You can only reduce your cpu temp by reducing coolant temperature. So if the CPU is 70C but the coolant has only gone up +6C, then you would be lucky to reduce cpu by more than 2C at high fan speed. Most of the cpu temp value is unavoidable and heat must pass through the cpu to be conducted away. This also is something you can learn from that 5 second stress test. That coolant to cpu temp difference at 100% cannot be lowered through the cooler. You would get the same result on a little air box as a massive external cooling array. The differences in coolers are how they handle watts over time. The only way to reduce the coolant to cpu difference at 100% is to reduce voltage.

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