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Higher CPU temps than expected


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First custom water build here like most of the posts I've seen in this forum. I'm seeing higher temperatures on my cpu than I expected, higher than my old Kraken x63 AIO even(280mm). CPU temps ranging from 40C to sitting in low 70's while playing cyberpunk with only pbo(4650mhz) activated. Previously my old aio kept my cpu with 200mhz boost to PBO(4850mhz) between 30C and 65C generally while playing games including cyberpunk. I also have a gpu in the loop adding additional heat. I've tried remounting the cpu block three times now but haven't seen any changes. I noticed the xc7 youtube video instructions and the instructions that came in the box are different, I guess they've updated the install instructions since the youtube video was put out. Below are system stats.

 

T-Sensor 30-45C

Nvidia 3080 with EK block 30C-60C no OC

AMD 5600x with xc7. 40C-70C(hit 82C with quick prime95)

Corsair 360 radiator

Corsair 280 radiator

3 x 120 noctua fans

2 x 140 noctua fans

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The "adding the GPU to the loop" has fairly strong implications. Before you putting 60-80W (maybe) into a single isolated 280mm radiator. That is easily dissipated. Now you have added 300W more with the GPU. With DLSS enabled you might only be at 225-250W in Cyberpunk, but obvious the total wattage in the cooling has increased by a hefty amount. Adding a second radiator is good, but it does not meet all the CPU heat gets dumped in the first radiator and all the GPU heat gets dumped in the next. Coolant temperature is the minimum possible component temp with 0v in an unloaded state. If you are getting up to 45C coolant, then a CPU temp of 75C is actually pretty decent. That's a +30C coolant/CPU differential. Most people with overclocked processors will see that value at +40-50C above the coolant temp.

 

I don't think you have a contact issue or you could not run Prime at all. Also the difference in temperature between previous and current is about exactly what I would predict for that level of wattage increase. I think the part to look at is why does the coolant temp get to 45C. +15C is a slightly larger than expected change for a custom loop. +10C at full gaming load is closer to the expected value, but this does depend on fan speed, radiator orientation, and general case layout.

 

Can you detail some of those things?

Edited by c-attack
LOL. "Meat". Another +1 for predictive text
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One thing for sure is that the fan speeds are lower than they used to be before which I expected to add some change but not the 10C difference I've seen. Prior to custom loop the 2 x 140 fans minimum speed at 50C and hitting 100% at 75C, these fans were on the AIO. I had 3 x 120 exhaust fans minimum 55% and hitting 75% at 100C. The AIO was the intake so the gpu really had no effect and I know this is one reason the temperatures were so good.

 

Currently all fans have minimum of 40% speed up to 36C T-sensor and increase to 100% at 70C t-sensor. The corsair pump has minimum duty at 60%, up to 30C t-sensor, increasing to 70% at 50C t-sensor, up to 100% at 65C t-sensor.

 

It is probably that exchanged a loud pc that made me want to keep headphones on while gaming for a quiet pc that the cpu runs at a higher temp and gpu has OC room.

 

I was hoping that the same clocks were going to keep cpu at 60C max and gpu at 55C max .

 

Quick question. Would using the ek air pressure leak tester aid in bleeding my loop? I'd really only be able to attach it to the top of the reservoir and I'm thinking it'll just end up sending air from the top of the reservoir straight to the drain fitting on the reservoir.

 

The "adding the GPU to the loop" has fairly strong implications. Before you putting 60-80W (maybe) into a single isolated 280mm radiator. That is easily dissipated. Now you have added 300W more with the GPU. With DLSS enabled you might only be at 225-250W in Cyberpunk, but obvious the total wattage in the cooling has increased by a hefty amount. Adding a second radiator is good, but it does not meat all the CPU heat gets dumped in the first radiator and all the GPU heat gets dumped in the next. Coolant temperature is the minimum possible component temp with 0v in an unloaded state. If you are getting up to 45C coolant, then a CPU temp of 75C is actually pretty decent. That's a +30C coolant/CPU differential. Most people with overclocked processors will see that value at +40-50C above the coolant temp.

 

I don't think you have a contact issue or you could not run Prime at all. Also the difference in temperature between previous and current is about exactly what I would predict for that level of wattage increase. I think the part to look at is why does the coolant temp get to 45C. +15C is a slightly larger than expected change for a custom loop. +10C at full gaming load is closer to the expected value, but this does depend on fan speed, radiator orientation, and general case layout.

 

Can you detail some of those things?

Edited by crash822
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No, don't use the pressure tester for that. I am imagining several possible outcomes. None of them good. Unless you have a giant bubble sitting over your CPU fins, any air in the loop is not responsible.

 

You will never ever hit 70C on the coolant. 45C is about as high as I would ever expect you to get and only in Summer or the hot part of the year. That does not mean you need to run your fans at 100% at 45C. A good working speed for 140s is 1000 rpm and 1200-1300 for 120s. However we are talking about +-1C with this kind of stuff, so I am thinking the underlying factors are more environmental.

 

How is the case and flow direction set up? I assume these radiators are front and top. Are they both intake? Are they both exhaust? How does the coolant temp compare to something like your MB temp sensor? I would expect them to be even at idle with the coolant increasing up to +10C for a hard gaming run.

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After about an hour of cyberpunk(crashed, what a surprise)

Ambient temp 20C

Water temp 20-40C

Motherboard temp 22C-47C

CPU Temp 31C-73C

GPU Temp 24C-63C

 

Have Fractal Design R6. The two 140 fans in front are NF-A14PWM in push configuration pushing air into the case. The thee 120 fans at the top are NF-F12PWM in a pull configuration pulling air out of the case.

 

As far as the pressure check, I was asking about using it to get some of the water out whenever I'm draining my system. I'd have the ball valve open. I do have minor air bubble in cpu block but it is maybe 1cm across and 5mm tall so it isn't really affecting anything. It was a question to avoid as much spilling of fluid whenever I drain my loop as possible.

 

Last question as well. Does corsair make extensions for their proprietary rgb connectors? My mainboard has 2argb headers, 1 is in use by the video card other is in use by cpu. CPU can't reach the daisy chain rgb header that my reservoir has and I'd like to light up the reservoir if I can. Maybe I'll have to get one of corsairs rgb control boards and put it in between the cpu block and reservoir.

 

No, don't use the pressure tester for that. I am imagining several possible outcomes. None of them good. Unless you have a giant bubble sitting over your CPU fins, any air in the loop is not responsible.

 

You will never ever hit 70C on the coolant. 45C is about as high as I would ever expect you to get and only in Summer or the hot part of the year. That does not mean you need to run your fans at 100% at 45C. A good working speed for 140s is 1000 rpm and 1200-1300 for 120s. However we are talking about +-1C with this kind of stuff, so I am thinking the underlying factors are more environmental.

 

How is the case and flow direction set up? I assume these radiators are front and top. Are they both intake? Are they both exhaust? How does the coolant temp compare to something like your MB temp sensor? I would expect them to be even at idle with the coolant increasing up to +10C for a hard gaming run.

Edited by crash822
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As far as the pressure check, I was asking about using it to get some of the water out whenever I'm draining my system. I'd have the ball valve open. I do have minor air bubble in cpu block but it is maybe 1cm across and 5mm tall so it isn't really affecting anything. It was a question to avoid as much spilling of fluid whenever I drain my loop as possible.

 

Maybe. That is not something I have used it for. Whether it will work or just break sections of remaining fluid into small drips I am not sure.

 

 

By your description, it seems like the front radiator is exhausting into the top radiator's intake path. There is a definite relationship between intake air temp and the cooling efficiency of the radiator. In simple form, if you blow 35C into the top radiator, the coolest it can possibly be is 35C. That makes flow path critical and if you go from front rad to top radiator, you are basically heating the water back up with the heat you just removed. The only way the top radiator can have any cooling effect is if the loop goes GPU->CPU (in either order) -> top radiator exhaust -> front radiator intake (pump/res not relevant). That way the air coming off the front radiator is as cool as it can be while the entering fluid temp for the top radiator will be as warm as it can be (CPU+GPU). You might be doing that already since it is a somewhat logical tube routing path.

 

Of course, you also can turn the top fans into intake to match the front or front fans to exhaust and run a reverse flow case. There are subtle pros and cons to each. Reverse flow is not good if you have it backed into a corner where the intake air becomes whatever is trapped between the case and wall. That negates the advantage of cool air coming in. The down side to dual exhaust is you are blowing warm air all over the motherboard, but since you are effectively doing this now you would see no change to the current PCH, VRM, RAM temps. That seems like the place to start.

 

The other thing bothering me a little is the apparent +23 coolant to GPU temp differential. This is usually based on power load and some luck in the silicon department. My 2080 Ti is not the greatest example of craftmanship in history by an stretch and I have frequently lamented its somewhat high differential at moderate power levels. However, even with modified VBIOS and a 400W load, the differential is still +21C. I would have expected lower for a 3080, unless you tell me you are also running a power cycle that allows close to 400W. Some of the partner manufacturers do allow this in their VBIOS. Regardless, don't go stripping this down or anything quite yet without direct evidence something is wrong.

 

Right now the focus should be on getting the coolant temp down 5-10C which will in turn take 5-10C off everything. That will make things a little rosier and a +20C change in coolant temp seems high for the hardware.

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My gpu is an evga 3080ftw3 edition which as a 400w bios by default, it has a 450w bios I could flash but I haven't tried it. I was looking online some more at other people's multi radiator setups and fan directions. It looks like most people are running similar to what I'm doing with front intake and top exhaust. There are a few who dropped their water temps from 42C to 40C by switching to all intake but they said their cpu/gpu temperatures didn't change at all. I do have some spare 120 fans laying around and I could mount one at the rear of the case so it would be hitting the 360 at the top with at least some fresh air. I'll do that today and report on if it changes anything.
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OK, then +23C may be on the mark at near 400W loads.

 

The problem with adding a rear intake fan is will affect the 1/3 of the radiator at best and still doesn't change the fact you are pulling the exhaust of one radiator into another. That front exhaust has no where to go but through the top radiator. The entire top of the case is likely that warm and I think the MB temp sensor lends some evidence to that. If your entire case is 45C, then the coolant in your radiators is going to be 45C as well. This is why I generally favor using them as exhaust and dumping the heat out directly. If you have a case where it you can easily remove the waste heat from two radiators, then the dual intake can possibly offer lower GPU/CPU temps by a few degrees because of the gains from using cooler outside air as intake for the radiators. That only can happen if the outside air is cooler and you have a way to remove it quickly from the inside. Otherwise you eventually heat the entire case. Classic signs of this are temps seem really good for the first 20 minutes, but they just keep creeping up. Typically in an all exhaust system, you will hit the peak coolant rise in 5-10 min, then it stays there.

 

I am quite sure there are a lot pictures of people exhausting their front radiator into the top. That doesn't mean it's a good idea. Part of that is the repeated reminder that this is the best way to run an air cooled case -- and it usually is. You no longer have an air cooled case. Selling people on running their airflow in the exact opposite way from back to front can be tough.

Edited by c-attack
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So I found a complete newb mistake I made. Luckily my room mates friend was here and wanted to see my loop. The loop is soft tubing and it looks like while remounting the cpu and other things I eventually made a kink in the cpu out tube. It may have also happened with the initial boot problem I had(newb mistake of putting the water temp sensor on the clear cmos pins). Right now the cpu is idling lower than it was previously so we'll see how that goes.

*edit* i ran prime95 for the hell of it and it is hitting 80C now instead of 82C already. I hate that I missed that the cpu out hose got kinked.

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Who would have thought that removing the kink from the cpu out hose would help.

 

Over an hour of cyberpunk

CPU Max 66C, was usually around 55C

GPU Max 52C, was usually around 50C

Water temp hit 38C, would get higher probably but still better than before.

 

The rear fan as an intake is also in but I'm guessing it isn't doing much. Going to disconnect it and see how my pc does tomorrow without it.

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I wouldn't worry too much about the rear fan. Even with it not there, the back fan on the top radiator will still pull air through the back mesh.

 

Good news on the tube. That was likely the leading cause of the higher than expected coolant temperature. That really was the penalty to everything. I still think you should try either both radiators as exhaust or both as intake at some point, but sitting on the current set-up for a few days makes sense to get a new baseline post repair.

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