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HX1000i PSU Tripping


ViperAttack
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Hello,

 

I have run into issues very recently with my PSU. When doing some various benchmarking where stressing the GPU with the PSU, the PC just shuts down (no blue screen)

 

Looking at the event logs on Windows, it is a Critical Kernel-Power 41 Issue which relates to the PSU.

 

Luckily this does not happen when playing games at maximum setting (RTX and DLSS enabled at Ultra), although when doing stress testing and benchmarking the PSU just trips.

 

I am using 3DMark to do benchmarking and it the PSU trips for this, the PSU also trips when running OCCT. This is strange because when stressing all of the components, the usage goes at around 600W and this PSU is 1000W.

 

Could my PSU be at fault here or is the mixing of Type 3 and Type 4 cables not allowed? I must either use Type 3 or Type 4? By looking at the specifications, my PSU can use Type 3 and Type 4 with the exception of the ATX, this must be a Type 3.

 

Edit

- I have reverted to using all stock PSU cables (Type 3) and tried to do a combined GPU and CPU stress test with OCCT and it still trips.

- I have plugged the PC to the wall and it stills trips when stress testing. (Before it was connected to a Surge Protector).

 

I now feel that the cables are not the issue, when stress testing, the usage of the PSU jumps by a high number which it may not like, I don't know if the PSU is faulty or if this is some safety mechanism in it that is turned on by default.

Edited by ViperAttack
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It happened to me only when i was tweaking my overclock and the CPU was undervolted a bit too much. Starting a cinebench run would just turn everything off, but less demanding tasks would still work.

Did you tweak the CPU parameters at all?

 

I didn't tweak anything, it is all set to Auto, all of my cores are currently set to 4.7GHz by default. When I check HWInfo, I can see the voltage is around 1.3V for the CPU and it changes every second depending on the frequency of the CPU since this also automatically change. Should I manually set a voltage static number maybe 1.35? And have all the cores at 5.0GHz?

 

Another thing I have observed is when benchmarking it pushes all my components to the limit and the wattage goes over 600, when it's over 600 for me this is when the PSU tripping happens.

 

When playing games at maximum settings, it is under 600 and never hits this number or goes above it. I still don't understand because the PSU should handle 1000W maximum, yet when it goes over 600W it trips.

Edited by ViperAttack
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Type 3 vs. Type 4 doesn't matter for anything but the 24-pin.

 

You're using two PCIe cables or three?

 

Another thing is, this might not be a PSU issue at all. Any time the PC shuts down for any reason unexpectedly, you're going to get a Kernel 41 error. Not sure where you read that it "relates to the PSU", but that's simply not true.

 

When the PSU shuts down, do you have to cycle the power to the PSU (the switch on the back) or can you just press the power button on the case to get it to come back up.

 

I ask this because if the PSU latches for protection on any rail for any reason other than the +5VSB, it hard latches the PSU requiring an AC power cycle.

Edited by jonnyguru
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Type 3 vs. Type 4 doesn't matter for anything but the 24-pin.

 

You're using two PCIe cables or three?

 

Another thing is, this might not be a PSU issue at all. Any time the PC shuts down for any reason unexpectedly, you're going to get a Kernel 41 error. Not sure where you read that it "relates to the PSU", but that's simply not true.

 

When the PSU shuts down, do you have to cycle the power to the PSU (the switch on the back) or can you just press the power button on the case to get it to come back up.

 

I ask this because if the PSU latches for protection on any rail for any reason other than the +5VSB, it hard latches the PSU requiring an AC power cycle.

 

When the PC does shut down, it restarts automatically, I don't have to flip any switch or press the power button.

 

I've done tests on the all of the components without using them together and it's fine, when I stress it to the limit that's where the issue happens. This is where I'd see the wattage go over 600.

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When the PC does shut down, it restarts automatically, I don't have to flip any switch or press the power button.

 

Ok. I thought you said the PC shut down. Not restart.

 

If it was a protection, the PSU would shut down. Not restart.

 

This is starting to sound less and less like a PSU issue.

 

Do you have "automatically restart" unchecked? http://jongerow.com/automatically-restart/index.html

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Ok. I thought you said the PC shut down. Not restart.

 

If it was a protection, the PSU would shut down. Not restart.

 

This is starting to sound less and less like a PSU issue.

 

Do you have "automatically restart" unchecked? http://jongerow.com/automatically-restart/index.html

 

The "automatically restart" is checked. Should I unselect it?

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Try making the PC crash again. See what it does.

 

For now I will avoid the harsh benchmarking and stress tests, I will continue to operate the machine with max settings on games for instance.

 

If by chance, there is a crash, now that I have unselected the restart, I must always get a blue screen before the PC crashes? Is there a case where I don't get the blue screen and the computer just shuts down while the restart on crash option is unselected?

 

Another question, going back to the unselecting the restart automatically checkbox, this means upon any crash, the PC will not restart at all? I must power it on manually right? And would I need to flick the power button on the PSU as you mentioned above before starting the PC?

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It should BSOD instead of restart.

 

 

And you would not need to flip the power switch on the PSU unless it's actually a PSU issue. Pressing the reset button on the case should restart the PC.

 

Usually the PC restarts after BSOD. Therefore, I wouldn't need to press anything.

 

Now that I have unchecked the restart after crash, is there a situation where the PC does not restart after the BSOD? If so, what could this issue indicate?

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Usually the PC restarts after BSOD. Therefore, I wouldn't need to press anything.

 

Now that I have unchecked the restart after crash, is there a situation where the PC does not restart after the BSOD? If so, what could this issue indicate?

 

Memory... motherboard... you need to do further troubleshooting.

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