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h115i Platinum 50c idle, 65c load gaming,32c liquid temp


Gel214th
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Hello,

 

I'm not sure what is wrong here. This is my first AIO liquid cooler, before this it was all air cooled.

 

Now when I am gaming the system is not overheating. Temps stay around 65C. My problem is when the load on the CPU is low, the CPU temperature fluctuates wildly between 35 - 55c sometimes from second to second so my idle temp is never low 30s or whatever it should be.

 

My Ambient is probably 22+ and I have a Commander Pro controlling the fans. Three ML120s and two ML140s on the cooler. Lian Li O11 Dynamic case. CPU is a 3800XT.

 

What am I doing wrong, or is this how AIOs work, where they only really kick in when CPU temps are high to keep them down?

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The cooler is working. The problem is with the CPU behavior at idle. The 32C liquid temp is the lowest possible CPU temp if the voltage was zero. Most people will see their cores dance 5-10C above that line at relaxed idle with the minimal possible voltage and you do see the low end of that. However, the Ryzen 3000 processors seem to be very reactive to any kind of program, including monitoring applications. You likely are at an elevated voltage state most of the time. Try quitting the CUE application and see what effect this has on idle temperature. This will not change the load temps.

 

If you find that beneficial, you can set CUE to behave as you want without the software running. In the setting, uncheck the 'start with system' option. For the cooler, the fan and pump settings are saved to the device automatically. You can save the lighting you want for the pump and fans as well in the Hardware Lighting tab of the the H115i Platinum. You won't have the same level of complexity without the software, but for the AIO and 2 fans you can do a fair amount. It doesn't look like you have any other CUE devices to worry about, but either way you can launch CUE, make lighting changes, then quit.

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The cooler is working. The problem is with the CPU behavior at idle.

 

Hi, so basically if my temperatures under load are ok, with this 3800XT I don't need to worry about the "idle" temps?

 

I mean I kid you not about the fluctuations

09LOq28.png

 

While Liquid temp is rock steady

 

zCHeTrb.png

Edited by Gel214th
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The CUE graphing tends to make mountains out of molehills when the range is narrow (like your pump reading). However, the CPU temp variance is likely true and there will be a matching voltage swing along with it. This is not something unique to you, but a common characteristic on all newer CPUs. They don't sit there and lay flat at idle anymore. Most recent CPUs are very reactive to any kind of program request or activity.

 

The coolant temperature will never jump around like the CPU. Remember "the liquid" is basically a waste heat transport from CPU to radiator. All "coolers" reduce CPU temperature by physically conducting the heat away from the CPU. What it does with the heat after that is what differentiates one type from another. Actual heat transfer involves continued load over time. The coolant won't heat up as the CPU dances around, anymore than a pot of water on the stove would suddenly change water temperature because you keep flicking the burner from low to high to low.

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I suspect here that before you got the water cooler you were using the motherboard cooling and often they don't use the actual CPU temperature. Gigabyte for example use a sensor that is close to the CPU but not the actual CPU. The advantage of this is that the temperature fluctuates more slowly. iCEU though measures the actual CPU temperature and it fluctuates much faster. I don't have your CPU, I have a 9700K, but I see fluctuations in the temperature too.
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So at the end of the day, I should be good cooling wise and my system isn't going to overheat, or isn't running dangerously hot to affect the lifespan of the components?

 

What about the Pump fluctuations, or apparent fluctuation, is that normal as well?

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The pump fluctiations are perfectly normal as well. The pump, and often also fans will not be able to run at an exact RPM (for example 2900), but will measure anywhere from 2850 to 2950ish. On the iCUE graph, these small changes can look quite big when in reality then are not.

 

I am running a 3900x on custom cooling, and I also see high idle temps (45-55c) while load temps stays well below 70c. Modern chips just runs really, really hot!

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I am running a 3900x on custom cooling, and I also see high idle temps (45-55c) while load temps stays well below 70c. Modern chips just runs really, really hot!

 

Ok thanks a lot, I was worried since this is my first AIO. From the responses it seems that what I am seeing, and the temperatures are normal. :biggrin:

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I had to look twice as well when I first booted my system up. Coming from an older intel system the temperatures was quite a shock:D

 

That's the price you pay for all them cores I guess.

 

It's reviews like this [ame]

[/ame] that caused me to think there was something wrong with my AIO. This is showing idle temperatures of 7 degrees over ambient,:bigeyes: which I think I may only see when the PC has just booted after being off for some time.

 

So I thought something was wrong, and I rechecked the screws, reseated the cooling plate, the fans...went through an involved check of everything because I thought I should be getting ambient+7c at idle. :laughing:

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Be careful trying to make 1 to 1 comparisons with test bench data. First, it does not mean the CPU temp sat there at a flat +7.3C over ambient (or whatever value). That is going to be a composite average over a period of time, likely several minutes (you can see him explain here). Their CPU temp is moving around too. However, it does probably move around less than a normal user's. Most "bench set-ups" are going to be a minimalist set of hardware with the least possible programs installed. You don't want Windows Defender deciding it is absolutely critical it runs a worthless system check in the middle of your test set. For the rest of us, we all live with all the things we install on our machines and a few that get installed without our consent.

 

Second, and this is extremely relevant, the data in the review above is not for a 3800XT or any other Ryzen 3000 series CPU. If you chase down the written review, you can see it's for a 5930K. This makes all the difference in the world. CPU behavior is both model specific, voltage specific, and user setting specific. To that end, you need to watch two things at once when examining this. CPU Temp and Vcore. The CPU temp is supposed to build up as Vcore increases. Your CPU temp is up and down at idle because the voltage is being applied and removed to the CPU on demand. It is not a physical issue. Unless you tranquilize your CPU with elevated power saving features, this is what it does at idle.

Edited by c-attack
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Be careful trying to make 1 to 1 comparisons with test bench data. For the rest of us, we all live with all the things we install on our machines and a few that get installed without our consent.

Unless you tranquilize your CPU with elevated power saving features, this is what it does at idle.

 

Thanks for your insight. I feel this should be included in the board stickies! :sunglasse

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I had to look twice as well when I first booted my system up. Coming from an older intel system the temperatures was quite a shock:D

 

That's the price you pay for all them cores I guess.

 

try to pump 1.45 - 1.5v on any intel CPU at idle and you'll see how your temps go :p

 

Ryzen behaves like Intel would on a very agressive loadline setting and high Vcore out of the box. that's why they are so toasty, and undervolting them became so common.

 

this may help shed some light on... thermal expectations, and chear some marketing BS that makes people worry when they see their 7nm Ryzen be a lot hotter than a 14nm Intel

[ame]

[/ame]
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