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No CPU temps on corsair link at all


buster84
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I upgraded from an old 6800k to a 10900k and an MSI meg unify board and now my corsair link software doesnt report any cpu temperatures. I can see the temps in different software but not this one. I upgraded the software to the lastest one and it still doesnt work.

 

How do i fix this? I purchased this watercooler to cool based on cpu temps and now ive lost that function. How do i get it back? (FYI, this is a new windows 10 install after the motherboard/cpu changes)

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Link went end of life 2.5 years ago, so any CPU released since then is not going to show data. A unified CUE + Link replaced both programs at that time.

 

https://www.corsair.com/us/en/downloads

 

What water cooler?

 

Its an CORSAIR Hydro Series H115i

 

So what you telling me is that Corsair is to cheap to simply update their software to allow it to work? Why even bother updating their product page to tell us that it works on the lga 1200 series chips. The only reason I avoided buying another one is because its now listed as compatible on their website.

 

https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Liquid-Cooling/Dual-Radiator-Liquid-Coolers/Hydro-Series%E2%84%A2-H115i-280mm-Extreme-Performance-Liquid-CPU-Cooler/p/CW-9060027-WW#tab-tech-specs

 

Seriously, why would i ever buy their product again. I'm actually building a second computer and was planning to buy another corsair since its been great for the last 4 years, but now I know who to avoid when it comes to water cooling.

 

Is there anyway around this, did anyone create a patch or something?

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The program was replaced 2 years ago. Is there a reason you can't use the new version? It does support the H115i.

 

If you are a minimalist and don't want the combined features of iCUE, then continue to use Link and use another monitoring program to track CPU temperatures. It's not even necessary for Link to run. Once you've set the fan curve and pump LED color, those will stay without Link running. Set it not to run on start-up and use a monitoring program you prefer.

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The program was replaced 2 years ago. Is there a reason you can't use the new version? It does support the H115i.

 

If you are a minimalist and don't want the combined features of iCUE, then continue to use Link and use another monitoring program to track CPU temperatures. It's not even necessary for Link to run. Once you've set the fan curve and pump LED color, those will stay without Link running. Set it not to run on start-up and use a monitoring program you prefer.

 

I thought Icue wasnt compatible either because i installed it and I still couldn't see the cpu temps and because of that I still cant control the flow based on the cpu temp. Without the pump knowing what the cpu temperatures are their is no way to set a proper fan curve. The only temp that is there is the temp of the h115i which is what Its defaulted to since there is no cpu temperature.

 

If Icue is supposed to work, then why is icue still unable to read the cpu temperatures like other programs can? Is their something else i need to download other than Icue?

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iCUE (CUE 3) should have been able read the cpu temp. You can see from my hardware drop down I have the same CPU, although technically the programs gets that data from the Motherboard. However, it is a very big jump going from the Link user interface to iCUE. It took me months to stop clicking things in the wrong way or wrong order. The cpu temps are automatically read by the CPUID service, but are not displayed until you go to the dashboard and add (+) the motherboard to the display. That then creates a box with temp readings and sensors.

 

Don’t use CPU temp for radiator fan control. It’s not how the cooler works. CPU heat is conducted away and no fan or pump setting will affect that rate. The “cooler” is really a waste heat transport device. It picks it up at the cold plate, then dumps it somewhere else. The fans and pump speed do affect that rate of dissipation, but if the coolant isn’t increasing in temperature, then an increase in fan speed won’t make it cooler. The relationship is +1C coolant temp (H115i temp) = +1C CPU temp. The key difference between air and water cooling is the liquid’s ability to hold the heat. There isn’t the immediate need to respond to changes in cpu temp. Slow and steady works well.

 

To put it another way, no cooler of any size will allow you to run 1.80v on the Vcore. “Cooling capacity” doesn’t matter. It’s instantly too hot the moment you hit maximum voltage. This is true at other voltages as well. If you are running 1.30v on the Vcore, then you will get Temp X in the first 1 second of load no matter what cooler you have. The cooler determines what happens after that. A small cooler that can’t handle the sustained wattage at that level will continue to warm and you can watch the cpu temp tick upwards. The massive quad 560mm liquid cooling system never warms up any more than the first 1 second, as it easily dissipates all the heat added to the system. With a 280mm, you are in the middle. I would expect a coolant rise of 6-10C depending on how hard you run and for how long.

 

More than anything else, the yo-yo fan ramping you get when linked to cpu temp on any recent cpu is more than most people can stand. Even if you don’t want to learn the coolant temp ranges and behavior, a simple “Quiet” low speed setting and higher fixed speed for load would be better than dynamic fan shifts from cpu temp. It also complicates what happens when the software is not running.

 

In your position, I think I would stick with Link and the program you know. With a new CPU you may be curious about a lot of different aspects of its behavior, like the kind of metrics you get from AIDA or HWiNFO. You won’t find that level of detail in CUE 3. You will have an easier time managing Link plus that. CUE and other full spectrum monitors will clash over polling the same hardware and this forces a lot of micromanagement.

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  • 2 weeks later...
iCUE (CUE 3) should have been able read the cpu temp. You can see from my hardware drop down I have the same CPU, although technically the programs gets that data from the Motherboard. However, it is a very big jump going from the Link user interface to iCUE. It took me months to stop clicking things in the wrong way or wrong order. The cpu temps are automatically read by the CPUID service, but are not displayed until you go to the dashboard and add (+) the motherboard to the display. That then creates a box with temp readings and sensors.

 

Don’t use CPU temp for radiator fan control. It’s not how the cooler works. CPU heat is conducted away and no fan or pump setting will affect that rate. The “cooler” is really a waste heat transport device. It picks it up at the cold plate, then dumps it somewhere else. The fans and pump speed do affect that rate of dissipation, but if the coolant isn’t increasing in temperature, then an increase in fan speed won’t make it cooler. The relationship is +1C coolant temp (H115i temp) = +1C CPU temp. The key difference between air and water cooling is the liquid’s ability to hold the heat. There isn’t the immediate need to respond to changes in cpu temp. Slow and steady works well.

 

To put it another way, no cooler of any size will allow you to run 1.80v on the Vcore. “Cooling capacity” doesn’t matter. It’s instantly too hot the moment you hit maximum voltage. This is true at other voltages as well. If you are running 1.30v on the Vcore, then you will get Temp X in the first 1 second of load no matter what cooler you have. The cooler determines what happens after that. A small cooler that can’t handle the sustained wattage at that level will continue to warm and you can watch the cpu temp tick upwards. The massive quad 560mm liquid cooling system never warms up any more than the first 1 second, as it easily dissipates all the heat added to the system. With a 280mm, you are in the middle. I would expect a coolant rise of 6-10C depending on how hard you run and for how long.

 

More than anything else, the yo-yo fan ramping you get when linked to cpu temp on any recent cpu is more than most people can stand. Even if you don’t want to learn the coolant temp ranges and behavior, a simple “Quiet” low speed setting and higher fixed speed for load would be better than dynamic fan shifts from cpu temp. It also complicates what happens when the software is not running.

 

In your position, I think I would stick with Link and the program you know. With a new CPU you may be curious about a lot of different aspects of its behavior, like the kind of metrics you get from AIDA or HWiNFO. You won’t find that level of detail in CUE 3. You will have an easier time managing Link plus that. CUE and other full spectrum monitors will clash over polling the same hardware and this forces a lot of micromanagement.

 

Sorry i meant to reply earlier. Your reply really helped me understand the water cooler more and after that I had to do more research because I only upgraded to the 10900k after my 6800k burned out (never overclocked either) and i originally thought that chip burned out because of my motherboard going bad but since then i threw in another cpu and it works fine. That is the reason why i created this thread, I wanted the fans to match the cpu temp originally thinking it that would provide the best cooling.

 

Over the last two week I had alot of freezing on my new 10900k system and so i reformatted windows thinking it was that, then it continued and after more investigating I came to the conclusion it was the corsair cooler. My new chip was idling at 55c and would drop down to 35c for brief moments then move back up to 45-55c and When playing games it was at 85C-90c.

 

Since then I decided to buy another water cooler since i dont have any air coolers and now my system stays at 30-35c when idle and maxed gaming was 55-60c so ive come to the conclusion the pump is either failing or there is something circulating in the system that randomly clogs the pump and affects flow. This would explain why my 6800k just magically stopped working and probably burned out.

 

I purchased the h115i from amazon in September 2016, so their is still a year left on the 5 year warranty, so I guess ill reach out to corsair and see what they say because at this point I definitely don't trust it anymore with my 10900k so I'm keeping this other setup as a backup, but If they repair it ill throw it back on my x99 with the other another processor.

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