Jump to content
Corsair Community

New H115i Pro owner


alusnova415
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

 

Just got a good deal on an used H115i Pro RGB, I decided for this model because I heard the pump it's quieter than the other H115s.

 

I do have couple of questions though, I know the fans are not LED or RGB but wondering if I can buy the RGB fans found on the Platinum model and what other parts I would need to make it work if they are even compatible.

 

I currently have a Noctua NH-D14 and my temps are great I think idle avg 25c, load 45-50c and Intel Burn Test 62c for example, so why get the H115i Pro? well I got it for $50 and have always wanted to try water cooling. So I'm wondering what temps should I expect (we know that things fluctuate) if all I change is the cooler from the Noctua to the H115i.

 

I guess I'm just wondering if water cooling is better than air cooling for CPUs, I have owned back to back Hybrid GPUS (980ti and 1080ti Hybrid) and those cards with a single fan 120mm/rad my avg is 30c on idle and 50-55c load vs 65-75c on previous cards on air, so for me putting an AIO cooler on the GPU is superior over air but I can't seem to find a definitive answer on water vs air for the CPUs.

 

Thanks for any insight and hope to engage with you all!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any other 4 pin PWM fan will work on the H115i Pro's fan controller. However, RGB lighting is an entirely different matter. The current draw for lighting is usually 2-3x the actual motor amperage. As a result, they need their own controller and power system. The Platinum coolers have their own controller built in for 2 fans only and that is why that cooler costs more. So you could add 2 ML-RGB (Quiet) fans from retail, the high speed model from the Corsair store, QL, HD, or whatever other model fan -- but you still need the lighting controller. If you go this path, your best bet is to buy the 2x140 "mutli-pack" that has the controller inside. You will not get that with the replacement ML140 High speed RGB fans for the Platinum as they were meant to be used with the lighting controller on that device.

 

 

 

Water vs Air - There isn't a universal answer for this and there is a definite Pros and cons list each user should assess. Water is a more capable carrier of heat energy than air and a water cooler offers you theoretically more heat dissipation -- if you need it. The larger your CPU total power draw (in watts not CPU temp), the more water cooling likely helps. If you are running a 5 year old i3 that uses 65W, it likely makes no difference. If you load up a stress test, all coolers will give you the same instant CPU temp for the next 10-15 seconds. The resulting temperature is a result of voltage and the physical conductive properties of the CPU and materials. Those are things you can't really change. It's what happens after that distinguishes one type or size cooler from another. The larger the cooler, the less fan speed you need in order to dissipate the CPU wattage. So a very small 120mm cooler might actually be worse off than a very large box air tower. It is smaller, has 1 less fan, and has to work harder. On the other hand, a pair 480mm radiators on the front of a Corsair 1000D can use any fan you want at the minimum speed and dump all the heat there without effort. The ability to do the job with less fan speed is the gain from moving up to to larger sizes. Ultimately, the largest sizes will be require water cooling because of the limited space around the CPU socket. A 280mm radiator is large enough it should outperform any air tower, provided the heat is there to get rid off. Otherwise, the performance is the same and then you have the following to consider.

 

Air cooling

Pros: Minimal moving parts, fans are replaceable, large block units are lower density giving them a more diffuse (less buzzy) sound. Ignoring dynamic load changes, an air tower is likely to seem quieter than a water system because 1) there is no pump; 2) the lower density radiator (less "air noise").

Cons: Theoretically less ability to dissipate large amounts of heat. High core, high TDP CPUs can out pace the cooler's abilities. Installation (maybe) - I can install/remove any AIO cooler in a matter of minutes. The last time I put in a large air tower, it took me 2 hours requiring the motherboard to be removed from the case and the use of tiny little proprietary wrenches made for German forest fairies. Small cases are hard either way, but even in large cases, fitting a large high performance air tower can be tough.

 

 

Water Cooling

Pros: Higher capacity to dissipate heat and the ability to target where it is released. An air tower requires fresh air coming into the front and the ability to remove what you blow out the back. In a traditional case style, that's not a problem. However, for cases with unique shapes or layouts, water cooling may have clear advantages. You can stick your radiator in the top to force CPU waste heat directly out of the case. You can put in the front to deliberately remove the cooling system from the heat zone created by the GPU. As mentioned, larger radiator surface area allows you to run low fan speeds and still get the same results. No cooler will allow you to run 1.50v on your Vcore and not melt the silicon. A large water cooler will allow you to run as high as your CPU temps allow and it will not get any warmer. When watts in exceeds watts removed, the air/water temperature increases and this is conducted back across the cold plate to the CPU. In effect, if you loads are moderate to high and long in duration, you may benefit from water cooling. It is over time the advantages are revealed.

 

All coolers want to conduct heat through/off the CPU as fast as possible. Now it's in the cooler. The air cooler needs to get rid of that heat as quickly as possible. Fans need to be reactive to changes to anticipate the heat build up that is occurring. For the AIO, the water cooling system really acts like a secondary storage compartment for heat. It can hold a much larger amount for a longer time without undue effect on the CPU temperature. This means the fans do not need to be reactive to CPU temperature. They only need to keep a moderate pace removing the heat. So if you do something that has lots of dynamic CPU load changes (like gaming), the air tower fans will be changing speed a lot. For water cooling, you can let them stroll along at a comfortable speed without needless fan speed changes.

 

 

Cons: Typically more expensive with more parts. It has a pump, which is obviously required to make the water move. The biggest complaint from people moving from an air tower to the water system is the pump noise. Before there was none. Now there is a new sound you're not used to. If you have the case on your desk, 18 inches from your ear, you probably can hear it at idle. The Pro series coolers have an ultra-low 1100 rpm Quiet pump mode where you will not, but also realize that is not an ideal pump speed for extended load like renders, gaming, etc. Once the fans kick up to medium, you are not likely to hear the pump.

 

Unlike a fan that is easily replaceable, a pump is not. If there is a mechanical or electrical issue, the entire unit needs to be replaced. Additionally, AIO units are designed to be "no maintenance" products, unlike a custom cooling system where you need to dump coolant and clean every 6-12 months. Like all no maintenance products, it will eventually wear out. People get upset when the coolant flow starts to slow down after 4 years and the cooler under-performs. That is the trade-off for no maintenance during those 4 years.

 

So is this right for you? For most people the answer is yes, unless you fit into one of two categories. 1) You have a tiny 65W CPU and your current temps on air are very low. You will not see much improvement on water unless there are other environmental circumstances. 2) You are a noise freak and like silence. I do not mean this in a negative way and I am extremely picky about sound frequency and tone. If you keep your living area as quiet as possible with no other sounds whatsoever (kids, ceiling fans, other people, etc.), you will likely notice the pump while working quietly as idle desktop levels. It can't not make noise and it has a higher frequency that a fan. That makes it more identifiable. I only notice this stuff in the dead of Winter on a cold, quiet morning. In Summer, a ceiling fan or the TV on in another room is enough to cover it. Regardless, if you know that's you too, make an informed decision.

Edited by c-attack
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any other 4 pin PWM fan will work on the H115i Pro's fan controller. However, RGB lighting is an entirely different matter. The current draw for lighting is usually 2-3x the actual motor amperage. As a result, they need their own controller and power system. The Platinum coolers have their own controller built in for 2 fans only and that is why that cooler costs more. So you could add 2 ML-RGB (Quiet) fans from retail, the high speed model from the Corsair store, QL, HD, or whatever other model fan -- but you still need the lighting controller. If you go this path, your best bet is to buy the 2x140 "mutli-pack" that has the controller inside. You will not get that with the replacement ML140 High speed RGB fans for the Platinum as they were meant to be used with the lighting controller on that device.

 

 

 

Water vs Air - There isn't a universal answer for this and there is a definite Pros and cons list each user should assess. Water is a more capable carrier of heat energy than air and a water cooler offers you theoretically more heat dissipation -- if you need it. The larger your CPU total power draw (in watts not CPU temp), the more water cooling likely helps. If you are running a 5 year old i3 that uses 65W, it likely makes no difference. If you load up a stress test, all coolers will give you the same instant CPU temp for the next 10-15 seconds. The resulting temperature is a result of voltage and the physical conductive properties of the CPU and materials. Those are things you can't really change. It's what happens after that distinguishes one type or size cooler from another. The larger the cooler, the less fan speed you need in order to dissipate the CPU wattage. So a very small 120mm cooler might actually be worse off than a very large box air tower. It is smaller, has 1 less fan, and has to work harder. On the other hand, a pair 480mm radiators on the front of a Corsair 1000D can use any fan you want at the minimum speed and dump all the heat there without effort. The ability to do the job with less fan speed is the gain from moving up to to larger sizes. Ultimately, the largest sizes will be require water cooling because of the limited space around the CPU socket. A 280mm radiator is large enough it should outperform any air tower, provided the heat is there to get rid off. Otherwise, the performance is the same and then you have the following to consider.

 

Air cooling

Pros: Minimal moving parts, fans are replaceable, large block units are lower density giving them a more diffuse (less buzzy) sound. Ignoring dynamic load changes, an air tower is likely to seem quieter than a water system because 1) there is no pump; 2) the lower density radiator (less "air noise").

Cons: Theoretically less ability to dissipate large amounts of heat. High core, high TDP CPUs can out pace the cooler's abilities. Installation (maybe) - I can install/remove any AIO cooler in a matter of minutes. The last time I put in a large air tower, it took me 2 hours requiring the motherboard to be removed from the case and the use of tiny little proprietary wrenches made for German forest fairies. Small cases are hard either way, but even in large cases, fitting a large high performance air tower can be tough.

 

 

Water Cooling

Pros: Higher capacity to dissipate heat and the ability to target where it is released. An air tower requires fresh air coming into the front and the ability to remove what you blow out the back. In a traditional case style, that's not a problem. However, for cases with unique shapes or layouts, water cooling may have clear advantages. You can stick your radiator in the top to force CPU waste heat directly out of the case. You can put in the front to deliberately remove the cooling system from the heat zone created by the GPU. As mentioned, larger radiator surface area allows you to run low fan speeds and still get the same results. No cooler will allow you to run 1.50v on your Vcore and not melt the silicon. A large water cooler will allow you to run as high as your CPU temps allow and it will not get any warmer. When watts in exceeds watts removed, the air/water temperature increases and this is conducted back across the cold plate to the CPU. In effect, if you loads are moderate to high and long in duration, you may benefit from water cooling. It is over time the advantages are revealed.

 

All coolers want to conduct heat through/off the CPU as fast as possible. Now it's in the cooler. The air cooler needs to get rid of that heat as quickly as possible. Fans need to be reactive to changes to anticipate the heat build up that is occurring. For the AIO, the water cooling system really acts like a secondary storage compartment for heat. It can hold a much larger amount for a longer time without undue effect on the CPU temperature. This means the fans do not need to be reactive to CPU temperature. They only need to keep a moderate pace removing the heat. So if you do something that has lots of dynamic CPU load changes (like gaming), the air tower fans will be changing speed a lot. For water cooling, you can let them stroll along at a comfortable speed without needless fan speed changes.

 

 

Cons: Typically more expensive with more parts. It has a pump, which is obviously required to make the water move. The biggest complaint from people moving from an air tower to the water system is the pump noise. Before there was none. Now there is a new sound you're not used to. If you have the case on your desk, 18 inches from your ear, you probably can hear it at idle. The Pro series coolers have an ultra-low 1100 rpm Quiet pump mode where you will not, but also realize that is not an ideal pump speed for extended load like renders, gaming, etc. Once the fans kick up to medium, you are not likely to hear the pump.

 

Unlike a fan that is easily replaceable, a pump is not. If there is a mechanical or electrical issue, the entire unit needs to be replaced. Additionally, AIO units are designed to be "no maintenance" products, unlike a custom cooling system where you need to dump coolant and clean every 6-12 months. Like all no maintenance products, it will eventually wear out. People get upset when the coolant flow starts to slow down after 4 years and the cooler under-performs. That is the trade-off for no maintenance during those 4 years.

 

So is this right for you? For most people the answer is yes, unless you fit into one of two categories. 1) You have a tiny 65W CPU and your current temps on air are very low. You will not see much improvement on water unless there are other environmental circumstances. 2) You are a noise freak and like silence. I do not mean this in a negative way and I am extremely picky about sound frequency and tone. If you keep your living area as quiet as possible with no other sounds whatsoever (kids, ceiling fans, other people, etc.), you will likely notice the pump while working quietly as idle desktop levels. It can't not make noise and it has a higher frequency that a fan. That makes it more identifiable. I only notice this stuff in the dead of Winter on a cold, quiet morning. In Summer, a ceiling fan or the TV on in another room is enough to cover it. Regardless, if you know that's you too, make an informed decision.

 

 

Thanks a ton for your reply, it's actually very informative and I learned something.

 

In regards to the H115i Cooler, I aimed for this model because the reviews state that its the quietest. Now I'm wondering what makes this model "quieter" than the other H115 models is it the fans (low rpm) or the pump? I guess I'm now hoping the pump performance is all the same across the models and if i were to add a higher rpm fans that the performance will increase if I were to need it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Pro series cooler's have an ultra low speed "Quiet" pump setting around 1100 rpm. That is significantly lower than most other AIO coolers, including other offerings from Corsair. The minimum pump speed on the Platinum is ~2000 rpm and there are mixed feeling about it's noise (the pump). The fans on the Platinum are the same as the Pro, except they have a higher max speed (2000 vs 1200rpm). Both fans perform equally at the same speed. There is no reason for you to be running more than 1000 rpm for your set-up. It's just going to be extra noise for 1-1.5C lower CPU temps. You made the right decision with the Pro if the goal is lowest possible noise profile.

 

Pump performance is rarely a factor at all in AIO performance. It's 1 cooling block (CPU) and 1 radiator with a short total length from start to finish. You will not see increased performance by setting the pump to 3000 rpm vs 2500 rpm for most CPUs. There is one exception and it's possible to be too slow and that does have an effect on temperature. The ultra low 1100 rpm pump speed will have a noticeably higher temperature if you run heavy load at that speed compared to the Balanced Mode at ~2160 rpm. In those conditions, the pump noise is not going to be a factor and normal fan noise is going to cover over it. You just have to remember to change the speed from Quiet to Balanced before you decide to run a 45 min CPU render or play a game for a few hours. If you hit 40C on the coolant, it should upshift automatically, but the preference is not to let it get that high in the first place.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...