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RM850 around 50 degrees celsius, fan doesn't spin


tkahn
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Hi!

 

I have the RM850 PSU, purchased in December 2013, so it's around 7 years old. It has worked flawlessly all the time and is still outputting all the power that my system needs. I have 5 hard drives, motherboard with an Intel i7, two AIO coolers, a GTX 1080 graphics card, 5 fans etc. Under full load I would say the system draws quite a lot of power.

 

Recently I have started paying more interest to the temperatures of various components in my computer and I happened to touch the casing of the PSU. It was very hot! When I held a temperature sensor to it it was close to 50 degrees celsius (122 Fahrenheit). This is so hot that you don't want to hold your finger to it for long, but it's not so hot that you get burned. Despite this rather high temperature, the PSU fan was not running at all. This makes me a bit concerned. Not only must the high temperature put a stress on the components in the PSU, it also generates a substantial amount of heat that the case fans have to move out of the computer case.

 

I know the RM850 has a zero RPM configuration, but when the PSU is this hot, one would think the fan should be running. I also followed Corsairs fan testing guide (https://help.corsair.com/hc/en-us/articles/360025085372-How-to-Test-a-power-supply-unit) both with and without a load on the PSU. The fan does not spinn up despite the paper clip that connects pin 4 and 5 on the ATX cable. When I switch the PSU off after the test, the fan makes a little "jitter", but that's it. My conclusion is that the fan seems to be okay, but the PSU never tells it to start.

 

What are my options? I'm thinking of rewiring the PSU fan by connecting it to an external fan connector that I can control manually or with the help of Corsair Commander. I have opened up the PSU so any warranty is long gone. It doesn't matter though since the PSU is so old.

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Now I have removed the old PSU fan and replaced it with another 140mm fan that is connected to the Corsair Commander via a fan cable that I managed to sneak out of the PSU case. I have a temperature probe attached to the PSU so I can monitor its temperature and I have set up a simple fan curve that starts the fan above 30 degrees C and gradually ramps it up until 50 degrees C where it runs at max.

 

I'm going to test this setup for a while to see how it works.

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