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icue h150i pro xt. difference between coolan and cpu temp


Iru121
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They will never be the same except when the PC is powered off. The CPU is 70C temperature because the pins underneath are applying a certain level of voltage. That level changes rapidly and so does the CPU temperature. The H150i or any other air or water cooler can't do anything about that. What coolers do is take that heat and move it somewhere else so the temperature doesn't get worse. The quick analogy is a pot of water on the stove. The CPU is the heating element underneath. The cooler is the pot of water. They will not be the same temperature. The heating element is always hot and the water receives the heat and its temperature increases based on how much heat and for how long it is applied.

 

On a 7700K with a 360mm radiator you are likely to see a +5-6C increase in coolant temperature under constant load. You might even see slightly more than that when gaming as the GPU heats up the case and raises the baseline temperature. Coolant temp is the lowest possible CPU temp at 0v. The CPU temp will be a most fixed value added to the coolant temp based on voltage at that second in time. Remember you can only lower the CPU temp by lowering coolant temperature (or reducing voltage). So if the coolant increase is only 4C, then you can only decrease CPU temp by 4C. You are not going to need to blast your fans very much and that is the difference between a 360mm and 120mm radiator.

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All coolers will give you the same cpu temp at 100% load — at least for a few seconds. It’s what happens after that reveals the differences. Smaller coolers will slowly start to loose ground and the the cpu temp will continue to climb. A very large cooling system may not increase at all. It’s still heat in vs heat out and the cooler’s ability to dissipate heat. Watts matter and a small i3 4c/4t can be handled a lot easier than a 16 core whatever. However, none of that prevents the cpu from getting hot in the first place. That’s still tied to voltage and the physical properties of the cpu. Edited by c-attack
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