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H60: how to detect broken pump?


Ziriax
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My Corsair H60 purchased in 2018 has been working fine, but lately I'm having frequent system hangs (7700k i7 CPU, slightly overclocked, 103Mhz base clock, 48x core ratio, 42x cache ratio, same as when I bought this in 2018).

 

It seems that under load, the "package temperature" rises very quickly to 95 degrees Celcius, and at 100 throttling happens.

 

This feels way to high. Could the pump be broken? How can I verify this, besides observing temps?

 

It seems Corsair extended the warranty for the H60 to 5 years, but I first need to figure out what is wrong...

 

Thanks a lot,

Peter

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If the pump has a mechanical or electrical failure, you typically will get a CPU Fan error on the next boot attempt or see 0 rpm on the MB header with the H60 lead.

 

Watch out if you have the original H60 (not the SATA powered H60 2018) and make sure the MB header is supplying the full 12v to cooler. That means disabling fan control for the pump, "Full Speed", 100%, etc. It's easy to forget about on BIOS updates where the control are reset to the default CPU fan curves.

 

The other possibility is a physical blockage of coolant flow path. When this happens, you can watch the CPU temp slowly and steadily creep up after cold boot. Not the normal jumping around, but 35-40-45-50-55 over a period of a few minutes, depending on how severe flow is restricted. You will also see the CPU temp hang at high levels after load. You try a stress test, it goes badly (100C CPU temp), but when you quit the CPU temp still hangs in the 60-70C range. Coolant temp is minimum possible CPU temp and this would show the coolant temp is way out of bounds. When this happens, you might also notice cold exhaust from the radiator despite high CPU temps and/or one hot tube and one relatively cool. Both tubes should be within 1C of each other and thus indistinguishable.

 

Other than those things, everything else is a voltage or contact issue. The "cooler problem" causes temp issues all the time. Even when there is no load the CPU temp will still creep upwards. A contact or voltage problem is tied directly to the Vcore. The temps might look almost normal when the voltage is stepped down, then instantly jump to extreme levels for minors tasks.

Edited by c-attack
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Thanks a lot for the detailed answer!

 

You are right, I don't have the SATA powered H60. And indeed, the BIOS did a reset of the fan curves. I'm going to put these to 100%. That does make the system a tad louder it seems. I'm going to monitor temps to see what happens. If that doesn't work, you gave me plenty of other information to try.

 

Are you aware of newer liquid coolers that could cool the i7700 better (it's still a fast CPU IMHO)?

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The pump rpm should read 4000-4400 rpm. The fan can run at more comfortable speeds and it is not necessary for it to run 100%.

 

The larger your radiator, the more heat you can dissipate but also do do with less fan speed. Other sizes are 240mm, 280mm, and 360mm. Even overclocked a 7700K is not a ton of wattage, although like all CPUs the core temps will get hot as voltage goes up. You are mostly looking at a couple of degrees difference between sizes with more noticeable reductions in required fan speed to achieve those results.

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