Jump to content
Corsair Community

Temperature Curves Configuration HI 150 Pro


Lolyko
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello, I would like to know if I can change the maximum temperature value of the Corsair HI150 Pro, since its maximum value is 60 and I would like to be able to increase it. In the Comander Pro, for example, if it is a higher value.

I leave some catches.

51566772_ICue1.thumb.jpg.23acffd9d2bcc470214b68e80cebe621.jpg

1353015772_ICue2.thumb.jpg.bb1d69c0286585c6e7e7b17b941de4de.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, the maximum scale is 60C because you are supposed to be using coolant temperature (H150i Temp) as the control variable from the fans. You should never reach 50C.

 

The radiators fans and pump remove heat from the coolant stream. Neither cools your cpu directly and that’s not how the process works. Running from cpu temp will make fans yo-yo up and down incessantly without actually offering any cooling benefit. This is especially true on Ryzen. +1C coolant temp = +1C CPU temp. If the coolant does not increase, then running the fans faster won’t help and it certainly doesn’t cool the underside of the CPU at the pins where the heat originates.

 

Regardless, if you insist on running the fans from the cpu temp, move the fans back to your motherboard so it can do the job. It doesn’t know you have a 360mm radiator for cooling and will run them like it’s a little air blower. CPU temp is a native control source for the motherboard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure, the Hi150 Pro's sensor measures the water temperature, and I've been working with that, but I wanted to try doing it directly with the CPU temperature.

By directly controlling the cpu temperature, this maximum of 60 ° is very cold for the 3900x, so it would have been nice to have more margin, as with the Comander Pro, which has a maximum of 100 °. But hey, it's fine anyway, and it was just to try other methods. It would be nice if Corsair could modify this parameter later in some update.

Thanks and regards

Edited by Lolyko
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well no, because that's not how the cooling process works. You could set it to motherboard temp too and the scale would be too large, but neither makes sense. The larger issue is iCUE must be running to get the CPU temp data from the motherboard. So as you save this "CPU temp based" curve to cooler, it will apply it to coolant temp when the software isn't running and you won;t get the results you expect. This is why I suggest you move to the fans to motherboard if you want to use CPU temp for control. That is the native source for the MB and the data doesn't have to be exchanged between programs. This is likely more important on AMD.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand what you are saying, but it is not exactly like that, if I configure the curve based on the temperature sensor of the Hi150, I get the same results as if I work with the temperature sensor of the cpu, that is, the working temperature of the cpu is the same, use the sensor you use. I know, because I monitor that data with Ryzen Master.

What I mean is that if I use the cpu sensor, as I have the maximum at 60º, the fans are practically 100%, with real cpu temperature at 50º in games, (as I say, monitored with Ryzen Master), which it's a pretty low temperature for the 3900x.

There is no problem with the software in using one sensor or the other, iCue works very well with both.

Thank you very much for your help

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Coolant temp and CPU temp are not the same.

 

Yes, everyone can see the range is too small for CPU temperature. It’s not meant for that use. The result is going to be unnecessary high fan speed changes with no a beneficial cooling effect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Coolant temperature is the most efficient and native control variable for the pump and fans. The actual "CPU cooling" is conductive and the a result of the physical contact between the cold plate and the CPU. It does not matter if you have an air or water system, the CPU temp reduction is all conductive heat removal.

 

What the cooler actually does it take that heat and move it elsewhere. If you don't, then the heat is transmitted again across the cold plate back to the CPU. Coolant temp is effectively minimum possible CPU temperature with zero volts -- it is the baseline. The relationship is direct. +1C coolant temp = +1C CPU temp. Same thing in reverse, lowering the coolant -1C results in -1C CPU temp. This is why fan speed is linked to coolant temp. If the coolant temperature does not go up, then you cannot reduce the CPU temp by making the radiator fans run faster.

 

The problem is that voltage is the dominant factor in end CPU temp and it significantly overshadows cooler choice. Depending on your CPU and voltage level, you have an relatively fixed offset of increased CPU temp to coolant temp at 100% load. For most people this is a +30-50C increase at 100%. Compare that to the coolant rise which for a 3900X on a 360mm radiator is likely to be +5-8C, the voltage is the clear problem. The example I normally give is if you take your 3900X and connect a little 120mm radiator to it and then set it up again with a massive external 1 meter long array, both coolers will give you the exact same end CPU when you initiate 100% load -- at least for about 10 seconds. It's at that point the heat in is greater than the heat removed and the little 120mm coolant starts to heat up. The huge external radiator array can easily remove the heat added in 1 pass and thus the coolant temp never rises. In effect, the coolant temp is the "penalty" and that is value you are working to minimize. The only way to reduce the end CPU in that first 1 second is to lower voltage, something most of us are not keen to do in exchange for the reduction in clock speeds. On the opposite end, if you set your CPU Vcore to 1.80v, neither cooler can save you. You hit the thermal limit 2 ms after you initiate the load. Voltage always rules and it is the limiting factor for all us.

 

Most people will see an idle coolant temperature of +4-7C above their room temp (depending on case design and location) and I would expect a further rise of +5-8C when under load. On an AIO, you can't ever get that 5-8C down to zero, but that is what you are working on. Remember that it is heat in vs heat removed. When your CPU temp spikes to 70C because you opened a program and the voltage increased to maximum, the silicon temps went up, but you really didn't add any heat into the system. There is always the element of time and cooler is playing a long game tug of war with heat in vs heat out.

 

120mm fans are not super effective below 750 rpm on a radiator and really start to improve at 1000 rpm. 1300 rpm is a good balance for performance vs noise for really heavy loads, but regardless you can set the fans to anything you want. Just remember it's only +1C to CPU when the coolant goes up. Most people run their fans too hard. People will make the argument that using CPU temp makes the fans respond faster thus cool better. Again this does not follow the math and if the coolant does not go up, then you can't reduce CPU temp with fan speed. The further counter argument is if you live in that critical state, you are better off setting the fans to run at maximum from start -- all the time. Obviously there is a headache waiting at the end of that.

Edited by c-attack
Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, a great explanation, it was all about trying different methods. From the beginning I have used the Hi 150 sensor, and I have configured it so that the fans work at 100% with a water temperature of 30º-32º. Below that, something softer to reduce noise.

Thanks again

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can probably relax the top end a bit if you want. Unfortunately, the underlying force in all of this is room temp. Your curve may be perfect in a 20C room, but then in worst days of Summer it will run near maximum in a 27C room with no hope of reducing the temperature one bit. It does require some seasonal fiddling for most people.

 

Either way, the key is that relatively steady fan speeds keep the heat moving out. The advantage of a water system or air cooling is it can hold more heat without massive negative consequences. You don't need to it to be reactionary and you will never see the "runaway temps" on a H150i where it just keeps ticking up and up and up, unless you pin the fans at 400 rpm or something to create it deliberately.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...