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760T Radiator Install


tomramos213
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I have 760T with an H100i V2 with the dual 140mm radiator/fan mounted on the top. I'm adding an EVGA Hybrid GPU cooler single 140mm radiator/fan in the front inside behind the 2 fronts fans, it won't fit in the rear because of the tubes from the H100i V2 in the way. Can I mount the EVGA Hybrid radiator/fan inside while still keeping the 2 front case fans in place on the outside? It looks like I can remove the front fan to screw the radiator/fan in place, there are marked holes 120/140 on the struts holding the front case fans. Opinions? The EVGA Hybrid will also be pulling air in like the 2 front case fans.
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You can and the radiator doesn’t care whether you are in or out of the case. However, be aware the exhaust temp coming off a single panel 120mm GPU radiator is going to be 40-55C. That’s all your gpu heat blown back into the case. Is there a reason you can’t flip the top 240 around so the hoses are on the front side? Do you need the 5.25 drives up there?
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So I had to return the EVGA Hybrid, turns out their AIO Hybrid kits no longer support my EVGA 2080 card. So am now looking into Corsair Hydro X. I am now wondering if I should dump my perfectly working H100i and build a system that cools both CPU and GPU or keep my H100i and just build a GPU cooling system only with the ability to upgrade if the H100i goes out. I got the H100i when it was first released, not sure how old it is.
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This depends on which component is closer to its limit -- GPU or CPU. In an ideal world, you would have separate cooling systems for each component perfectly matched to the wattage it uses. Doesn't really play out in reality.

 

If you run separate loops (CPU=AIO, GPU=Hydro X), the CPU will benefit. It can dump its relatively small 135W (I am giving that 3600 large round up) in a 240mm radiator. The GPU will be on its own 280mm(?) radiator up top and need to dump its 300W through that.

 

The comparative state is combined loops. Now you have 240+280mm radiators, but also 135W + 300W combined. The GPU benefits from this because it now has a slightly better radiator to watt ratio. However, the CPU now has a worse state as it will share coolant baseline with the GPU.

 

Does it matter? A full water cooled GPU will usually run between 40-50C. This is such a drastic improvement or air cooling, you would immediately say it does not matter. However, be aware most Nvidia 2000 series GPUs have definite clock down points around 40C, 47C, and 50-51C. Some people get frustrated to see it drop 15 Mhz as it crosses the line. You shouldn't because it will be 100 MHz higher than air, but that is the reality. For the CPU, you might run +5C warmer sharing loop space with the GPU. If you do something regularly where you max out the CPU temp like extended encoding or something similar, it might be a factor. However, keep in mind the above only comes into play when running moderate or better loads on both devices, like gaming. In a combined loop, both CPU and GPU will fare better in one sided loads - GPU or CPU dominant since it has two radiators working on dumping the heat.

 

What radiator you can sitck where and for what device may be very relevant. I am not sure if the hoses on the AIO can reach the front of the case. You definitely want the GPU radiator to exhaust directly out. That might mean running a reverse airflow (back to front) so top and front can be exhaust.

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