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Is the corsair XD3 any good?


charbel1011
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For a 1 CPU - 1GPU loop? Sure. DDC pumps have pretty good low end, so besides size its a nice choice for those that like to keep the pump speed lower. I just put one into O11 XL with 2x360s, CPU + 2080 ti. I don't gain anything by pushing the pump past 3000 rpm. That would suggest it is able to push things through my 9 x 90 turns and one full vertical 360mm radiator. Near silent below 1800 rpm at 36". It does have the characteristic tone of a DDC that is slightly higher pitch than a D5, if that kind of thing bothers you. However, that sound also seems to easily disappear under medium fan speed and is very faint at lower desktop pump speeds.
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Hey brother i already bought the stuff and that xd3 pump/res combo. but people are filling my head with scary stuff. like how bad hydro x is and how bad like the quality and it's plastic. it's my first loop and they got me nervous as i already ordered the stuff. can u shine some info on it?
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You can largely ignore most of the nay sayers. There are a lot of really good stories on here too. Some people have had negative experiences with some aspects of their builds, but from what I've seen when its a genuine issue either the folks here will help get to the bottom of it, or if its a device problem then Corsair do their bit too.

 

Its human nature to complain when things don't go well, but we don't often do the opposite so the reality is a lot of the noise is negative to some degree.

 

Hydro-X isn't perfect, but it is a very good overall solution that works well for the vast majority of what most people want it to do. And it is well supported, and affordable.

 

Enjoy your build :-)

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Sure it's plastic/POM/acetyl whatever. I am not sure what people think it should be made of. Some complained the XD5 reservoir was not glass. In this application, using glass in the window seems crazy. Frankly, I like it better than my XD5 and it is a unique shape. If I want to nitpick, I wish the wires for power and speed control were sleeved, but you can do that yourself or hide them.

 

I think the only other thing to mention is look at the design of the unit. The pump motor inlet is in the lower center and it will create a counter-clockwise vortex to draw in the water from reservoir. When you start to crank up the speed, this will shift the fluid inside the reservoir at a slight angle. I think it's interesting, but I know a few people on the OCD end of the scale that might get worked up about the water line no longer being level. Or maybe just make themselves seasick watching it all day.

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Sure it's plastic/POM/acetyl whatever. I am not sure what people think it should be made of. Some complained the XD5 reservoir was not glass. In this application, using glass in the window seems crazy. Frankly, I like it better than my XD5 and it is a unique shape. If I want to nitpick, I wish the wires for power and speed control were sleeved, but you can do that yourself or hide them.

 

I think the only other thing to mention is look at the design of the unit. The pump motor inlet is in the lower center and it will create a counter-clockwise vortex to draw in the water from reservoir. When you start to crank up the speed, this will shift the fluid inside the reservoir at a slight angle. I think it's interesting, but I know a few people on the OCD end of the scale that might get worked up about the water line no longer being level. Or maybe just make themselves seasick watching it all day.

 

 

Will the XD3 corsair pump be powerful enough to flow water for this gpu block https://www.ekwb.com/shop/ek-quantum-vector-ftw3-rtx-2080-ti-d-rgb-nickel-plexi and cpu only? so 1 gpu and 1 cpu?

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Definitely. I am using the same GPU block. Most CPU blocks have similar restriction. My 360mm radiators are on the higher end for restriction compared to some other models. I have 9x90 deg turns including radiator and block entry/exit. I don't have any problems. I can use the low 1500-1700 rpm speed at idle with clear flow. The temperature does not change when I bump it to 3000 rpm, so I know the flow rate is not the limiting factor.
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Definitely. I am using the same GPU block. Most CPU blocks have similar restriction. My 360mm radiators are on the higher end for restriction compared to some other models. I have 9x90 deg turns including radiator and block entry/exit. I don't have any problems. I can use the low 1500-1700 rpm speed at idle with clear flow. The temperature does not change when I bump it to 3000 rpm, so I know the flow rate is not the limiting factor.

 

Because the 2080 ti evga ftw3 ultra i have has a huge gpu block it's a beefy gpu. and i was like how in the world that small xd3 pump gonna make al the liquid flow.

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Definitely. I am using the same GPU block. Most CPU blocks have similar restriction. My 360mm radiators are on the higher end for restriction compared to some other models. I have 9x90 deg turns including radiator and block entry/exit. I don't have any problems. I can use the low 1500-1700 rpm speed at idle with clear flow. The temperature does not change when I bump it to 3000 rpm, so I know the flow rate is not the limiting factor.

 

Hey brother i got one last question is 360mm radiator enough for cpu alone to cool and OC?

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A 360mm radiator is enough for any CPU at any overclock level. You will be voltage limited there, even with a measly +3C coolant delta. The GPU will be the big heat source in the loop.

 

Im not going to cool the gpu for now. And for the beginning ill cool only the cpu. People are saying i9 9900k provides a lot of hot and 1 360mm for cpu alone wont be good enougn and i need to go with 420mm?

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I will round up and consider all things worst possible case and put a 9900K@5.0GHz with a power draw of 225-245W.

 

300W is a common test load because that is more common for a GPU. Delta C/300W for the following radiators at 1 GPM flow rate and 1300 rpm single layer fans (a common medium speed).

 

Hardware Labs 360 GTS (equivalent to Corsair XR5 30mm) = +9.77C

https://www.xtremerigs.net/2015/02/11/hardwarelabs-nemesis-360-gts-radiator-review/4/

 

Hardware Labs SR-2 420 = +7.84C

https://www.xtremerigs.net/2015/10/03/hwlabs-sr2-420-mp-radiator-review/4/

 

However, a few points to consider. 1300 rpm on 3x140 is not the same as 1300 rpm on 3x120 for noise. This metric gives the 420 an advantage. If you equalize for noise, 1100 rpm on 140mm will be equivalent to 1300 on the 120mm. This is my experience across a wide range of fans and radiators. Following the data points on Extreme Rigs chart for the SR-2, that puts the delta for 300W+1100 rpm in the low 9.xC range, or about -0.5C vs the 360mm. Second point of consideration is the SR2 is a fantastic 60mm thick 9 fpi radiator. The 360 GTS and Corsair XR5 are standard 30mm thick. To get that half degree back, you need 30 more mm. If you look at the data for the GTS, push-pull on the 360 (+25mm fan vs +30mm rad) will take you back to +9.0C. In effect, when balanced for noise a 420mm thick radiator is effectively tied with the 360mm push pull. No matter how you want to read it, the battle is over a fraction of 1C at 20% beyond the highest possible load you get can on a 9900K.

 

Now I am not trying to convince you to use a 360 vs 420. You pick the one that fits your case in the best fashion. Just don't feel like you have downgraded yourself if that is 360mm. I love 140mm fans and have spend most of the past 10 years building cases that cater to that design. That said, I think I am finally worn down and just a did a 9x120 build in an XL. The 120mm fan size has some advantages in terms of radiator throughput compared to the larger radius 140mm fan. Still the differences between sizes all overlap. I can make the push-pull 2x280s in my 740 run the same coolant delta as 2x360 single layer. A push-pull 360 will match the 420. A push-pull 420 will match a 480mm, etc.

 

Now all of that was assuming a larger than possible load. It may have some relevance if you are folding, running near constant CPU renders, or something similar. However, most CPU load is very dynamic and your typical loads will be half that wattage. So now we talking about 0.25C in a +4-5C coolant delta. That also represent the total gain/loss with the cooling system 4-5C. If your CPU is 75C at 100% and coolant has increased 5C, the most you could possibly reduce it with a wall of 360mm radiators is those same 4-5C. In reality, most people hit the floor at +3C since you can't remove the heat from fluid while it is still in the CPU block.

 

It would be really cool if you could just strap an extra set of fans or crank up the pump speed and take 10C off the top. It never works that way. On each hardware upgrade piece, you are fighting for 1C. 1C on the CPU block, 1C on the radiator, 1C on the fans. A 3C improvement is large. These are all tiny saving compared to the inescapable voltage heat that exists at the CPU level. That is the limit of overclocking any modern CPU. As for 360 vs 420, totally your choice, pick the one that fits without compromising everything else. It is not a game changing decision for performance.

Edited by c-attack
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