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h60 and h75 (2018) pump questions


dream3
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No, neither the H60 (2018) or H75 are software controlled. These are classic power the pump and power your own fan set ups. You need to set the H75 at maximum on the fan header and the H60 is now SATA powered, so it will automatically be at maximum.

 

Tube length? Typically all Corsair coolers are about 11.5 inches (300mm), but the H75 is a little older and may be a tiny bit shorter.

Edited by c-attack
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No, neither the H60 (2018) or H75 are software controlled. These are classic power the pump and power your own fan set ups. You need to set the H75 at maximum on the fan header and the H60 is now SATA powered, so it will automatically be at maximum.

 

Tube length? Typically all Corsair coolers are about 11.5 inches (300mm), but the H75 is a little older and may be a tiny bit shorter.

 

 

Thank you! Is there any 120mm AIO with adjustable pump speed? I really want a 1000 RPM pump for silent operation.

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Not that I am aware of and I do not think it exists from any manufacturer. Flow rate is not the most important characteristic in a radiator, but there is a point where things are too slow and performance is drastically affected. The counter balance is radiator surface area. If you have a 560mm radiator, you let it flow like a lazy river and the 5 fans and huge fin surface area make up for it. The opposite is true as well. Down at the 120mm radiator size, pump speed is more critical and so is fan choice. Since the surface area is smaller, the other variables have a larger impact.

 

The Pro series Corsair H100i/115i/150i were the first I remember to deliberately include a very low pump speed (Quiet=1100 rpm). Every one else had been going to opposite direction for a while, chasing the performance review prize of being at the top of the chart, even if by only 0.4C. You don't see a lot of this and the other Platinum line has a more traditional minimum speed of near 2000 rpm.

 

I am going to assume the point in all of this is you want the quietest desktop work environment possible. When the fan speeds are low in an all SSD system, the pump might be the only noise you hear. I would take a look at professional reviews were they do a noise comparison at idle. The load ones will always be fan dominated. The idle one is a better indicator of pump noise. The 2018 H60 seems to favor competitively. I will also assume you need the 120mm size or you would be looking at the H100i Pro. You may also want to look at air cooler data while you are analyzing sound levels. Often they are included in there as well. The fans will be higher at idle, but then there is no pump. A 360mm radiator will crush any air tower. At the 120mm size the pros and cons are more balanced.

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Not that I am aware of and I do not think it exists from any manufacturer. Flow rate is not the most important characteristic in a radiator, but there is a point where things are too slow and performance is drastically affected. The counter balance is radiator surface area. If you have a 560mm radiator, you let it flow like a lazy river and the 5 fans and huge fin surface area make up for it. The opposite is true as well. Down at the 120mm radiator size, pump speed is more critical and so is fan choice. Since the surface area is smaller, the other variables have a larger impact.

 

The Pro series Corsair H100i/115i/150i were the first I remember to deliberately include a very low pump speed (Quiet=1100 rpm). Every one else had been going to opposite direction for a while, chasing the performance review prize of being at the top of the chart, even if by only 0.4C. You don't see a lot of this and the other Platinum line has a more traditional minimum speed of near 2000 rpm.

 

I am going to assume the point in all of this is you want the quietest desktop work environment possible. When the fan speeds are low in an all SSD system, the pump might be the only noise you hear. I would take a look at professional reviews were they do a noise comparison at idle. The load ones will always be fan dominated. The idle one is a better indicator of pump noise. The 2018 H60 seems to favor competitively. I will also assume you need the 120mm size or you would be looking at the H100i Pro. You may also want to look at air cooler data while you are analyzing sound levels. Often they are included in there as well. The fans will be higher at idle, but then there is no pump. A 360mm radiator will crush any air tower. At the 120mm size the pros and cons are more balanced.

 

thank you, that was very helpful. you are 100% right.

 

the problem i face most of times is pump buzz/hum/rattle, which for some reason is ignored in reviews and seems to not show up in dba levels. The 100i pro for instance, inaudible for me at 1000 RPM. However it buzzes at 1500 RPM, while reviews state that it should be inaudible at idle.

 

Ill try to look for more youtube videos where i can actually listen to the pump working.

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  • 4 weeks later...
thank you, that was very helpful. you are 100% right.

 

the problem i face most of times is pump buzz/hum/rattle, which for some reason is ignored in reviews and seems to not show up in dba levels. The 100i pro for instance, inaudible for me at 1000 RPM. However it buzzes at 1500 RPM, while reviews state that it should be inaudible at idle.

 

Ill try to look for more youtube videos where i can actually listen to the pump working.

 

Your unit might be Asetek, so you should not hear any buzz at 1500rpm. In fact the pump runs at 3000rpm, just that some motherboards / apps read the pump pulse wrong and show 1500rpm.

 

If the buzz is getting over the case noise and is strong, you should contact the support. They are not supposed to be noisy. I had two Asetek pumps (H55 / H75) and you could only hear a slow buzz getting really close to the case, and my case sits just by my side and I could not hear anything. My rig was pretty silent with a Noctua cooler (U14S) and low rpm case fans. Both pumps running at 12V 1500rpm (3000rpm).

 

I would also not run the pump below the max speed. There is a post from a Corsair engineer here saying that the pump should be always receiving 12V from the header. If your unit has a firmware that adjusts the speed (quiet/performance, etc), fine, you can run it slow, but it is the app doing the work and it is still receiving 12V from the header. He said that if you have a unit with no speed control and you lower the speed through the header, changing the voltage on your motherboard, you could have voltage oscillations that will break your pump overtime, depending on the voltage quality, pretty quickly. So, in these units with no speed control, you should run always at max speed (12V) to avoid problems down the road.

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Your unit might be Asetek, so you should not hear any buzz at 1500rpm. In fact the pump runs at 3000rpm, just that some motherboards / apps read the pump pulse wrong and show 1500rpm.

 

If the buzz is getting over the case noise and is strong, you should contact the support. They are not supposed to be noisy. I had two Asetek pumps (H55 / H75) and you could only hear a slow buzz getting really close to the case, and my case sits just by my side and I could not hear anything. My rig was pretty silent with a Noctua cooler (U14S) and low rpm case fans. Both pumps running at 12V 1500rpm (3000rpm).

 

I would also not run the pump below the max speed. There is a post from a Corsair engineer here saying that the pump should be always receiving 12V from the header. If your unit has a firmware that adjusts the speed (quiet/performance, etc), fine, you can run it slow, but it is the app doing the work and it is still receiving 12V from the header. He said that if you have a unit with no speed control and you lower the speed through the header, changing the voltage on your motherboard, you could have voltage oscillations that will break your pump overtime, depending on the voltage quality, pretty quickly. So, in these units with no speed control, you should run always at max speed (12V) to avoid problems down the road.

 

Thanks, glad to know i should not run a fixed speed pump at lower than spec.

 

As for the first part, I can definitely hear the buzz from my h100 pro at 1500 RPM and of course even louder at 2000 RPM. I cannot hear anything at 1000 RPM and that it why I wanted a 120mm AIO with adjustable pump speed. They should all be asetek so it makes sense they will all do the same buzz under the same RPM.

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Thanks, glad to know i should not run a fixed speed pump at lower than spec.

 

As for the first part, I can definitely hear the buzz from my h100 pro at 1500 RPM and of course even louder at 2000 RPM. I cannot hear anything at 1000 RPM and that it why I wanted a 120mm AIO with adjustable pump speed. They should all be asetek so it makes sense they will all do the same buzz under the same RPM.

 

What exact model do you have? For example, the H100i Pro RGB is CW-9060033-WW. Corsair has three OEMs for the AIOs if I'm not mistaken. Asetek, CoolIT and the one for the H45, each with a different pump and rpm.

Edited by Contiusa
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  • 2 weeks later...
What exact model do you have? For example, the H100i Pro RGB is CW-9060033-WW. Corsair has three OEMs for the AIOs if I'm not mistaken. Asetek, CoolIT and the one for the H45, each with a different pump and rpm.

 

 

Its the CW-9060033-WW yes

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  • 3 weeks later...
Its the CW-9060033-WW yes

 

Then it is the Asetek unit (rounded coldplate) and should run at 3000rpm at all times unless the unit has Corsair Link, but the pump heather should be always at 12V. You just adjust the speed with the firmware (Corsair Link). If there is no Corsair Link, run it always at 12V.

 

As I said, some motherboards will read the pump pulse wrong and indicate 1500rpm. You can check the Asetek site, where it states the pump at 3000rpm and they list their clients, such as Corsair, EVGA, Thermaltake, etc.

 

And the Asetek pump is pretty silent. You can hear just a low hum if you get your ear to the side panel of the case, so it is inaudible seating a few palms away. But make sure it is the pump, because it can be other harware making the noise, or even the fan, air bubbles in the loop, etc.

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