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i9-9900KS temps with H150i PRO RGB


MazQuick
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Hello there,

 

I'd like to ask a question about temperatures I get with H150i Pro on i9-9900KS, using 3 stock fans at Extreme and Pump at Balanced in iCUE app.

 

And the temps I get at almost 100% CPU usage are around ~80C. I wonder if that's a fine temperature for this cooler or should I maybe replace the stock fans with something better? Fans set at Extreme (and CPU usage over 90%) go around 1,5k RPM. The thermal paste I use is Thermal Grizzly last changed 3 months ago.

 

I'm just curious :)

 

Cheers.

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The difference between an average fan and a great fan might be 2C in coolant temperature on a 360mm radiator -- at most. The ML series is a capable fan. There isn't much ground to gain there.

 

There are two aspects to the CPU cooling. The first is thermal conductive. Electricity at socket pins creates heat at CPU. That heat must physically pass through the CPU and then into whatever type of cooler (heat dispersal) unit you are using -- air or water. This part is all about physical materials, CPU design, and most of all voltage.

 

Once the heat is in the cooler, it is ready to be moved elsewhere. That's really what's going on with your water cooler. Heat picked up at the cold plate. Dropped off in the radiator channels where the fans help blow it somewhere else. If you don't get the heat out, it will build up and add heat back to the CPU. On a 360mm radiator, the most you can drop coolant is 1-2C per pass. In reverse, a +1C increase to coolant temp equals +1C to the CPU temp. That makes the cooler end of things a small part of the total CPU temp increase. Most 9900K users will see coolant temp increases of +6-8C on the H150i, depending on clocks and wattage generated. Theoretically, that means the most you could ever reduce CPU temp by with fans, pump settings, etc. is then that same 6-8C. In reality, even with enormous 4x480/560mm radiators, it is almost impossible to get the coolant temp rise to zero and there is an effective limit of around 3-4C depending again on wattage.

 

That means that of the +40-50C increase you see when fully loaded, the majority is voltage based and there isn't much you can do there, except of course reduce voltage. You can get a pretty good handle on this figure by noting the idle CPU temp and then what is 1-2 seconds after starting a 100% load test. In those first seconds, the flow rate, fan speed, and the rest are not in play and it is all voltage heat. If you run a linear stress test like the Bench Stress Test in CPU-Z, you can load up and then watch the CPU temp climb +1C every 60 seconds or so in tune with the same increase in coolant temp. That is a good demonstration about how this works.

 

If you feel the 80C is high, take a look at your Vcore set voltage. Definitely gains to be made at the stock setting since they will have a lot of extra coverage to make the worst CPU ever boot up. There are some secondary settings that can limit extra voltage padding in specific situations, like extended high load for renders, encoding, etc. This is specific to each motherboard brand.

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