Jump to content
Corsair Community

i7 8700k with H115i


eoun46055
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello

 

My i7 8700k at 4,7Ghz (all core) at 1,384V (laut HW INFO) reaches in AIDA 64 (only CPU without FPU) almost 90°C. I have swapped the original Fans for Noctua NF-A14 PWM (max 1500rpm).

 

I have just activated "Enhanced Turbo" in the Bios.

 

Is the voltage to high?

 

The water reaches 36,6°C after arround 15min.

Is the water temp normal?

 

I have remounted the Coller with noctua nt-h1. But No improvement.

 

Thanks

Edited by eoun46055
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those temps are certainly due to the voltage. There's not going to be anything you can do about it; the heat is generated at the pins where voltage is applied. It can only be removed so quickly, especially if your chip isn't delidded. Changing coolers won't fix that.

 

The increased temp of the water is expected; it's removing the heat from the CPU and can only shed it out of the radiator so quickly. Since we don't know your starting coolant temp or your ambient, we can only guess ... however, that doesn't seem unreasonable given a typical room temperature for ambient. It also shows that the cooler is working as intended.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You need to take manual control over the voltage. I only use 1.33v to run 5.2GHz. 1.38v is not a reasonable number, but typical of what happen when you allow the BIOS to override the single core turbo function without giving it specific voltage limits.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello

 

Thanks for the Answer!

I have now tried to take manual Control over the voltage.

I have come to 1,23V at 4,8GHz (no AVX offset). But further testing is required.

 

AIDA 64 (only CPU without FPU): ~70°C at ~1050rpm

 

AIDA 64 with FPU: ~90°C at ~1500rpm

 

It seems so that the "automatik" from the mainborad applied way to much volltage.

 

Thanks a lot!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello

 

Thanks for the Answer!

I have now tried to take manual Control over the voltage.

I have come to 1,23V at 4,8GHz (no AVX offset). But further testing is required.

 

AIDA 64 (only CPU without FPU): ~70°C at ~1050rpm

 

AIDA 64 with FPU: ~90°C at ~1500rpm

 

It seems so that the "automatik" from the mainborad applied way to much volltage.

 

Thanks a lot!

Hi,

 

Here are the settings that I use with my 8700K 4.8GHz OC:

OC Explore Mode: Expert

CPU Ration Apply Mode: All Core

CPU Ratio: 48

CPU Ratio Offset When Running AVX: 0

Ring Ratio: 45

EIST: Enabled

Intel Turbo Boost: Enabled

Enhanced Turbo: Disabled

CPU Loadline Calibration Control: Mode 4

CPU Core Voltage Mode: Adaptive+Offset

CPU Core Voltage: Auto

CPU Core Voltage Offset Mode: -

CPU Core Voltage Offset: 0.020

Intel C-State: Disabled

CPU Lite Load: Mode_1

 

https://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?topic=330834.0

Edited by Polo6RGTI
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, a lot of the BIOS terms are brand specific and I haven't had an MSI board in 10 years. It all looks fine to me, except I am wondering if you really want to use negative offset. Offset does what you would think and subtracts 0.02v from the defined standard voltage vs frequency curve. The problem is the curve is not always "0.02" or whatever too high. It may be just right at middle or low frequencies and when you pour it on, it will be far more than 0.02 high. In the original settings, it was adding a good 0.12v more than necessary. Negative offset can cause crashes in low load situations or low to middle transient changes.

 

If the board allows it, set CPU core voltage to "Adaptive" (this is variable like auto) and then it should give you the option to set the max level. On Asus boards this is done in the "additional turbo voltage" category created when you select adaptive. You set that limit (probably 1.24 to 1.27v for 4,8GHz"). I am not sure what this looks like for MSI, but surely it must be there.

 

You may want to leave C-States enabled. Current generations CPUs are very jittery on the desktop and this is part of the scheme to cut power usage. The days were it would pop up during load or gaming are long gone, but this is still a user choice. Most x370 and 390 boards will have hardware level power saving that work in conjunction with or underneath C-states.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...