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Issues with H115i PRO liquid cooler


ray1992
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Hello,

 

I have recently bought a full new PC and have been having a ton of issues with the water cooling.

 

After I built my PC I had the feeling that it was way louder than it should. I am not saying it was super loud, it was just way louder than I would expect when the PC is in idle.

 

Anyhow, I went to the place that I bought the case&cooler from and they told me that in their opinion its not the cooler but the case just being bad for a watercooler. So I let them change it to a different one.

 

Result: Sound is pretty much unchanged.

I surrender to my PC overlord now, it shall stay as it is. BUT, now I have the Problem that my CPU cooler fans are at 1100 RPM constantly. I had them set to "Balanced" inside of iCUE before changing fans and they usually were around 800 RPM. Now, while at balanced and me only watching a stream on the side, they are permanently going at 1100 RPM and I simply cant explain HOW. If I set them to "quite" the noice level is just the way I would like to have them, but afaik if set to "quite" it does not automatically ramp up if CPU (or the water temp) go to far up when gaming.

 

So my question pretty much is: What the hell should I do? Why is the RPM of the roofs in the same setting I used before?

 

I really hope someone can help me here, I am starting to lose hope and patience with this new rig....

 

 

And while at it: What is a normal temp for my CPU? I seem to always sit at around 50° when just surfing, watching yt/streams. While gaming it goes up to 65° roughly. I am not sure if these are normal values for a water cooled CPU.

 

PC stats:

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X

X570 AORUS ELITE Mainboard

16GB RAM

Nvidia GeForce RTX 2070 Super

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The coolant temp is also referred to as "H115i Temp" and is located to the right of the pump graphic in iCUE.

 

The fan curves are presets like any other with a temp x = fan speed Y program curve. They are not actually sound sensitive or self-adjusting based on noise. For most people the issue is any curve must have a baseline temp and speed. A PC system that is very quiet in a 20C environment will be louder when moved to a 30C one. Everything in the case moved +10C, including the coolant. The answer for most people is set up their own fan curve in accordance with their normal baseline coolant temp. You can't reduce the coolant to below local ambient temperature. No reason to blast the fans and try. The fans are quiet at the desktop. Moderate speed under load. Most people never need high fan speed.

 

However, your idle temps seem a bit warm and I am generally curious as to why. Can you list your case as well (doesn't matter if its another brand) and as mentioned above where the radiator is located?

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My coolant Temp is at 31-35° when doing basic tasks on my PC now that I have set the Fans to "Quiet" (pump @balanced).

 

 

My radiator is mounted at the top and acts as exhaust (takes air from inside the case and spits it at the radiator). I have 2 fans as intake in the front and one as exhaust in the back, just to add that piece of info.

 

The case is on a stand to my left side, so it has a lot of free air around it.

 

Now I also have the funny situation that one of my case fans seems to adapt speed to the CPU temp and keeps spinning faster and slower again with each spike the CPU shows.

 

During some stresstesting I did yesterday the max the coolant reached was 36° btw.

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The coolant temp is also referred to as "H115i Temp" and is located to the right of the pump graphic in iCUE.

 

The fan curves are presets like any other with a temp x = fan speed Y program curve. They are not actually sound sensitive or self-adjusting based on noise. For most people the issue is any curve must have a baseline temp and speed. A PC system that is very quiet in a 20C environment will be louder when moved to a 30C one. Everything in the case moved +10C, including the coolant. The answer for most people is set up their own fan curve in accordance with their normal baseline coolant temp. You can't reduce the coolant to below local ambient temperature. No reason to blast the fans and try. The fans are quiet at the desktop. Moderate speed under load. Most people never need high fan speed.

 

However, your idle temps seem a bit warm and I am generally curious as to why. Can you list your case as well (doesn't matter if its another brand) and as mentioned above where the radiator is located?

 

I got the Define R6 PCGH from fractal design

 

Edit:

One more thing I want to add. I read a bit on the internet yesterday about my CPU and its temps. One thing I found is some posts stating that for whatever reason the CPU is always operating at max voltage even during low load, which causes these high temps. I have had HW Monitor open now while eating and watching yt and I feel like I might have the same problem. My voltage s eems to vonstantly be dancing around between 1,3V and 1,4V, this is during a usage of 5-10%. I am guessing this should not be the case and voltage should automatically go down if usage is low, or am I wrong in this assumption?

Edited by ray1992
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At 31-35C you will likely see a further increase of 4-6C when under load. That puts you just under 40C and that is why the fans get loud. On a heavily overclocked cpu a 40C coolant temp as a basis will mean 100% load cpu temp of 80-90C. Your issue is your baseline is about 10C higher than most people or at least those in a 20-23C room. If you do things warmer than that, it will play a part in the coolant temps.

 

Modern CPUs don’t often drop the voltage to a flat line 0.6-0.7v like the days gone. Their power levels are handled below the OS level and while the Vcore may be up, that does not mean actual power use (and thus heat) is up too. You might take a look at cpu watt metrics in HWiNFO. Then you probably need to close it. Running two monitoring programs at a time causes a lot of issues. Besides the polling conflicts between them, recent CPUs try to give these things maximum performance when it should downgrade the priority. The 3000 AMD chips have been particularly problematic with this and there is a lot of internet traffic discussing the issue. In the end, AMD told everyone to go write new programs. I don’t have one and am not current on which ones have a milder hit than others. Regardless. Running two is like splashing gasoline around.

 

Any thing up top like a dust filter that might overly restrict the airflow?

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