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so meany issues with corsair products


VikingHamster
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constant issues with my h115i aio,so im now concerned as the temps just dont show the correct temps,ie it sits at 28,50 and never changers its all up to date but hwm shows cpu in the 50s so is my aio broken?

 

if it is then im done with corsair,ive had two keyboards lose there RGB capabilitys and some keys just stop working within 6 months,both my corsair mice have both just stopped working,my void headset constantly loses connection letalone has a hard time reconnecting.

 

ive been a corsair user for the last 5+ years from cases to keyboards to mice and ram but im feeling that corsair is now just a joke imho.:(:

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The display to the right of the pump is the coolant temperature, not CPU temp. It is often referred to as "H115i Temp" in the software (or the relevant model number). Coolant temp is the critical metric for understanding cooler efficiency and functionality, but if you have never had a cooling system that displays this, it requires some observation and adjustment.

 

Whether you have an air tower or a water cooling system, cooling is a two part process. It's not really "cooling" either. It's transporting heat elsewhere. The first part is conductive. Heat originates at the CPU pins and CPU junction where voltage is applied. It then conducts through the CPU->TIM->cold plate into the cooling system. For air towers that is pipes/air and for the H115i that is the liquid. This is stage 2. Liquid then carries the heat to the radiator where the fans help dissipate it out of the system.

 

Effectively you have two waiting rooms. If you overload the first room with heat (voltage), it doesn't matter what you do with fans and pump speeds. There is too much heat in room 1 and the transfer rate from 1->2 is fixed. We are limited by voltage or we could run crazy frequency/voltages with massive radiators. We can't. The second room is the heat removal. It takes it in from the first and then dumps it out. As long as you keep the flow moving, everything works out. Stop the flow and the line backs up into room 1 and CPU temp goes up. This is why the fans use coolant temp as a control variable. If there is no heat build up in room 2, then there is no reason to increase the rate of heat dissipation (fan speed).

 

The equation is +1C coolant temp = +1C CPU temp. The same works in reverse. Your CPU and coolant will only be the same temperature when voltage is zero - the system is powered off. At idle, they will be close. With normal power saving features, the CPU cores should dance slightly above the coolant temp as they turn on and off. At 100%, the difference between coolant and CPU temps is a fixed value directly related to CPU design and mostly due to your voltage. You can only lower this by lowering voltage or by making some physical change to the CPU (like delidding).

 

You'll have to learn your own coolant temp range to understand it. Most people will see +4-7C above room temp at idle and then another 6-10C above that at maximum sustained load. GPU heat can play into that as well. A +1C increase in case temp adds +1C to everything else. This is mostly relevant for setting the fans to comfortable levels. Since your room/case temp is always the baseline, most people will want to set their own curve based on their environment and preferences. You can do this by going to the Performance Tab, click the + to create a custom curve, then select one of the three shape tools in the upper right part of the graph. Those correspond to the three presets (Quiet/Balanced/Extreme). You can then adjust each point up or down by a fixed offset to adjust for your room. The base curves were programmed for a 20-23C environment. Most people won't need to lower. However, if your idle coolant temp is 28C, you can shift each point up by 5C to keep idle speeds at unnoticeable levels. Fan speed is not overly critical to cooling function. Nobody overheats because their fans were at 600 rpm instead of 800 rpm. Those differences are single degrees. Go with noise tolerance and then you can experiment with performance at your leisure.

Edited by c-attack
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