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Latency and tight timing please help.


charbel1011
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So im building my gaming pc and i picked the i9 9900k and asus maximus code and i went to the qvl sheet to have the higher chance of compatibility and i picked https://www.newegg.com/product/N82E16820236463?m_ver=1 Can somebody tell me if those are good or not and if they will have any type of bad impact on gaming will i lose fps? I wanna play on 3440x1440. I know they are not tight timing or low latency. Will that be a problem?
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You can select any frequency you like between 3200-4000+ and it will all be the same. I am using the same hardware and playing at the same resolution and have been up and down through that zone. The only the RAM factors in is when you get too greedy and over lock or tighten timings too much. Then you are likely to experience stutter and pauses.

 

That is a decent set of timings for 3466 and it seems like a good value for 64GB. My 32GB 3600C16 kit cost more than that at half the capacity. However, you absolutely do not need 64GB of RAM for gaming. You won’t next year. Or the year after. We’ll all be on DDR5 or even 6 before 64GB is necessary. Right now is when people are just starting to wonder if it’s time to jump from 16GB to 32GB, and no, it’s not necessary yet either. If you can find the same frequency and timings in 4x8GB form for less, that would be the way to go.

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You can select any frequency you like between 3200-4000+ and it will all be the same. I am using the same hardware and playing at the same resolution and have been up and down through that zone. The only the RAM factors in is when you get too greedy and over lock or tighten timings too much. Then you are likely to experience stutter and pauses.

 

That is a decent set of timings for 3466 and it seems like a good value for 64GB. My 32GB 3600C16 kit cost more than that at half the capacity. However, you absolutely do not need 64GB of RAM for gaming. You won’t next year. Or the year after. We’ll all be on DDR5 or even 6 before 64GB is necessary. Right now is when people are just starting to wonder if it’s time to jump from 16GB to 32GB, and no, it’s not necessary yet either. If you can find the same frequency and timings in 4x8GB form for less, that would be the way to go.

 

The only reason i went with this memory is because it was on the QVL page for my motherboard. And it has a higher chance to run stable with xmp on since it has been tested. Yes i know i dont care about the 64gb i just want something to stably run. So u think i wont have problems running that memory at that speed right! I wont stutter or bottleneck or whatever

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There are no memory bottlenecked games, at least without deliberately creating a block. You need to run high FPS games at low 1080 resolutions to start creating differences. Most people don’t and shouldn’t care about 239 FPS vs 241 when playing CS:Go at minimum settings. That’s not what you’ll be doing with 3440x1440.

 

3466 should not be an issue on a Code XI. I can run 32GB at 4266 in the same board.

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There are no memory bottlenecked games, at least without deliberately creating a block. You need to run high FPS games at low 1080 resolutions to start creating differences. Most people don’t and shouldn’t care about 239 FPS vs 241 when playing CS:Go at minimum settings. That’s not what you’ll be doing with 3440x1440.

 

3466 should not be an issue on a Code XI. I can run 32GB at 4266 in the same board.

 

I wanna thank you so much for your explanation! And your help! A lot of people troll me and try suggest something that wont work so they can waste my money because they know im new. The only part i was worried is the timings. Somebody suggestion i should get tighter timings and he said i should a samsung b die but im not sure

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There are no memory bottlenecked games, at least without deliberately creating a block. You need to run high FPS games at low 1080 resolutions to start creating differences. Most people don’t and shouldn’t care about 239 FPS vs 241 when playing CS:Go at minimum settings. That’s not what you’ll be doing with 3440x1440.

 

3466 should not be an issue on a Code XI. I can run 32GB at 4266 in the same board.

 

So you really think those timings on the memory i got aint bad right?

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There are a lot of people who obsess over memory overclocking. It is difficult and time consuming. For gaming the return is next to none with definite penalties for mistakes. At least when you really screw up you get a nice BSOD or app crash and you know it. The worst case scenario is when you are almost perfect, but just a little off. Tiny errors invisibly hamper your performance.

 

Yes, if you had two identical frequency kits, the one that is Samsung b-die is more likely to overclock further or run a given frequency at slightly tighter timings. However, this is splitting hairs even for benchmarks with no tangible gaming enhancement. You will pay a premium for it. If you are going to run the XMP settings and frequency, then it won’t matter if it is b-die or not. It doesn’t give better benchmark scores because it’s Samsung. It’s because you theoretically can push it further.

 

There was an old gamer praxis that lower CAS latency somehow meant lower in game physical latency. This was repeated endlessly. That’s not really how it works. At a given frequency, a CAS latency of 16 is certainly better than 19. However, the difference is a few nanoseconds. That’s not something anyone can sense even when multiplied out a hundred operations in a fraction of a second. Most of the time people are trying to decide between something like 3200C15 vs 3200C16 so the difference is extremely slight. Most kits can drop one CAS rank with just a little voltage bump. When a new memory technology emerges (like DDR4,DDR5, etc.) differences in latency are sometimes more dramatic than changes in frequency. As the memory tech matures, the jump in performance for 1 frequency rung dramatically outpaces latency levels. We are at that level now where frequency matters more than CAS latency. For example, I can take my Dominator 3600C16 kit and tighten it down to 3200 14-14-28-T1. However, that setting will loose out to 4000 17-19-39-T2 in every Read, Write, Copy, and Latency rest. Even at 5 column address rungs slower, the increase in frequency makes up for it terms of final or completion latency.

 

The bottom line is the only people who need to worry about b-die or forcing their RAM down one more set of timings are sport overclockers or those who like to post their read-write scores across the internet. Memory tweaking is a really hard place to make tangible performance gains. Some of us are stubborn and try anyway.

Edited by c-attack
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