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Corsair H150i OK for a I9 10920x ?


sloeri
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Yes, the 2066 uses the same bracket as 2011. Easy screw down since the cpu already has its own back plate.

 

Thanks :)

 

still trying to decide wether i will go for Hydro X

or for a CPU AIO, and a GPU with a AIO cooler like the 2080ti Aorus Extreme WB

Edited by sloeri
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That is a tough decision. I have done it both ways. The advantage of single component cooling (the AIO plan) is each device is separate from the other. This can be helpful for mixed load type usage where one piece of hardware (most likely the CPU) is getting really close to the limit. Sharing a coolant pathway with a 350W GPU does not help the 150W CPU.

 

In contrast the combined custom loop offers you double the radiators and a clear advantage in single component dominant loads. CPU heavy tasks show minimal coolant rise since it has (for example) 2x360mm radiators to expel heat versus 1x360 for a H150i. A light CPU game with a heavy GPU load also lets the GPU dump heat from both radiators providing cooler GPU temps than it would with 1. This is most notable on the new 2080 Ti cards. In the past, I could cool a Titan X(P) with a 120mm and keep it below 50C except on the hottest day of the year. I don't think a 120mm will do it with the new GPUs. They run hotter at the chip and that makes the coolant temp even more critical. Can't really get away with a 45C coolant temp now.

 

That is all a bit over-magnified. Both systems will work, but you must be ready to get into custom cooling -- both the build and the more frequent maintenance. You don't really have the same plug and play safety net you do with AIO cooling. Accidents can happen and you need to be prepared. A pre-build water block card like the one you referenced will save you a few hours while maintaining a warranty. That one would be a much better choice than one listed in my specs. I regret that one all the time, or mostly its 169mm width and 305mm length.

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That is a tough decision. I have done it both ways. The advantage of single component cooling (the AIO plan) is each device is separate from the other. This can be helpful for mixed load type usage where one piece of hardware (most likely the CPU) is getting really close to the limit. Sharing a coolant pathway with a 350W GPU does not help the 150W CPU.

 

In contrast the combined custom loop offers you double the radiators and a clear advantage in single component dominant loads. CPU heavy tasks show minimal coolant rise since it has (for example) 2x360mm radiators to expel heat versus 1x360 for a H150i. A light CPU game with a heavy GPU load also lets the GPU dump heat from both radiators providing cooler GPU temps than it would with 1. This is most notable on the new 2080 Ti cards. In the past, I could cool a Titan X(P) with a 120mm and keep it below 50C except on the hottest day of the year. I don't think a 120mm will do it with the new GPUs. They run hotter at the chip and that makes the coolant temp even more critical. Can't really get away with a 45C coolant temp now.

 

That is all a bit over-magnified. Both systems will work, but you must be ready to get into custom cooling -- both the build and the more frequent maintenance. You don't really have the same plug and play safety net you do with AIO cooling. Accidents can happen and you need to be prepared. A pre-build water block card like the one you referenced will save you a few hours while maintaining a warranty. That one would be a much better choice than one listed in my specs. I regret that one all the time, or mostly its 169mm width and 305mm length.

 

Thank you C-Attack for taking the time to provide the pro and contra's for both ways.

the 2080ti comes with a 240mm rad.

https://www.gigabyte.com/be/Graphics-Card/GV-N208TAORUSX-W-11GC#kf

Reviews i have been reading are top notch. (but the price is as well)

 

i really love the easthetics of a custom cooling loop like Hydro-X, but i'm a bit worried for maintenance and building the thing together. that is where AIO's shine, they are super easy. perhaps 10 to 20% less efficient, but since i'm not an overclocker they should do the deal.

 

but i haven't made any decision yet, weighing out all options :)

 

At this moment, it's like 60-40 in advantage of the AIO route, but still some time before i place my order :)

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