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how to set max temp for customized fan curve


rg500g
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When I attempt to create a customized fan curve, the max temp shows as 60C. I reviewed tutorials on youtube and tried to find how to set max temp to something like 80C and could not find a way. I bought an H100I Pro a couple of days ago.

 

If max temp is not readily modifiable I can run the fans off of my BIOS or motherboard utility. If I have to do that, and remove iCUE, all I would need to worry about us pump RPM. How is it controlled if iCUE is not managing it? The single wire would not provide control I think, and I'm happy to leave it at max rpm, but I have no visibility. I take it the SATA power is mandatory no matter what to power the pump. Is SATA power necessary to feed the fans?

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If your coolant temp hits 60C, you have big problems and likely about 15 seconds before the PC shuts down to protect itself. Radiator fans are supposed to run from the coolant temperature (H100i Pro Temp). That's how it works. Cold plate conducts heat off the CPU into the water stream. Fans remove heat from the water. Making the fans spin faster or slower will have no effect on the heat created underneath the CPU where pins meet silicon and the heat is created.

 

You can take the fans off the cooler's fan controller and move it to your motherboard for CPU temp control. That is going to be a wild ride with fan speeds continuously ramping up and down. If you haven't had a new CPU is a few generations, there is no more sitting quietly on the desktop. This is literally spinning your wheels without purpose. The fans cannot move more heat out of the coolant by jumping around. If you are running some critical level, you set the fans to a fixed rate at the highest speed you can stand, but that would be a lot easier from the desktop in iCUE than having to dive into the BIOS to set it up.

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If your coolant temp hits 60C, you have big problems and likely about 15 seconds before the PC shuts down to protect itself. Radiator fans are supposed to run from the coolant temperature (H100i Pro Temp). That's how it works. Cold plate conducts heat off the CPU into the water stream. Fans remove heat from the water. Making the fans spin faster or slower will have no effect on the heat created underneath the CPU where pins meet silicon and the heat is created.

 

You can take the fans off the cooler's fan controller and move it to your motherboard for CPU temp control. That is going to be a wild ride with fan speeds continuously ramping up and down. If you haven't had a new CPU is a few generations, there is no more sitting quietly on the desktop. This is literally spinning your wheels without purpose. The fans cannot move more heat out of the coolant by jumping around. If you are running some critical level, you set the fans to a fixed rate at the highest speed you can stand, but that would be a lot easier from the desktop in iCUE than having to dive into the BIOS to set it up.

 

Definitely a paradigm shift then. Currently radiator fans are set in BIOS with a customized curve keyed off of CPU temperature. I pulled up iCUE and the motherboard/fan control utility and CPU shows 30C at idle (power saving mode on 3600x processor). The coolant temp shows 26.1 in iCUE. I then run Prime95 test and CPU temp holds steady at 75-76, while coolant temp rises 1.5 degrees. Temperatures of CPU and coolant do not change over 15 minutes, and the fans of course are howling.

 

I'm probably not being realistic about the ability of the cold plate to pull heat out of the CPU. If coolant does not get above 30C then there is not enough swing between idle and full tilt to configure any customized curve. Not what I expected out of the system, but it is what it is.

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I'm probably not being realistic about the ability of the cold plate to pull heat out of the CPU. If coolant does not get above 30C then there is not enough swing between idle and full tilt to configure any customized curve. Not what I expected out of the system, but it is what it is.

 

Your missing the point... if the coolant isn't heating up a lot, then the radiator and fans are already dumping most of the heat at the current fan/pump speeds. It doesn't need to speed up. Metals are metals and their properties known. Everyone scraps to make a block that is 0.5C better than someone else. It is small margins.

 

All of us are voltage->CPU limited, no matter how big your radiator and how many fans you have. If I give you a 120mm radiator and a 2m panel with 16x120mm fans, both coolers will give you exactly the same CPU temp in the first 10 seconds of Prime 95. The difference is the 120mm will start to take more heat than it can expel within 30 seconds or so and the temp of the coolant rises. The 2m panel is also hot at the CPU from the first second, but the coolant will never rise as the massive panel dumps every bit of heat on each pass. Coolant temp is baseline or lowest possible CPU temp. For each +1 coolant rise, your CPU temp goes up +1C as well. The 120mm cooler will see rising CPU temps over time at 100%. The 2m panel has a flat CPU temp from second 0 to the end. The relevant measure of CPU energy is watts and that can be converted into a 1C/1mL of water kind of measurement. However, it is most definitely not 1C of CPU temp = X degrees of coolant.

 

Bigger radiators get you slightly better temps, with a lot less fan speed. But there are no miracles and you can't run 1.50v and still be under most people's safe zone. Voltage is the limiting factor.

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As c-attack stated, you want your fan curves to be based off coolant temperature and not CPU temperature. After all, your radiator/fans are essentially performing the task of keeping the coolant in check who's job is to draw heat from the CPU via the cold plate. Safe coolant temperatures for an CLC (below a temperature where the tubes may begin to permeate fluid) is in reality sub 50°C. If on the other hand you decide to use the CPU temperature (incorrectly in popular opinion) as a basis for fan speed, you'll be hearing the fans bouncing up and down through their (fan curve set) RPM range almost continuously when the CPU is in reality doing next to nothing.

 

As an example, I run a full custom loop and below is one of my custom fan curves for a ML-120 fan (let's call it "My Balanced" - a compromise of noise vs. performance) from my Commander Pro:

 

No code has to be inserted here.

 

As you can see, the highest coolant temperature I'm concerned about is 40°C. In fact, all my curves are built using 40°C as a maximum with the fan speeds set according to how aggressive I want the cooling to be performed. Once my loop normalises, my coolant temperature never exceed 5~10°C above ambient temperature anyway but I do have 900mm worth of radiators to exchange heat between the coolant and the atmosphere.

 

Finally, users may find a need to tweak the base temperatures for their fan curve depending on ambient temperatures (be-it the season or where they live in the world) to suit. For example; somebody living through a Siberian winter compared to another residing in Singapore during summer (air-conditioning not withstanding).

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