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Another question about the H115i RGB Platinum


TioDrakul
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Okay, now I have the new hardware working and because it is completely different from what I used to have before I would like, if possible, to have indications if the readings I am getting are as expected or if they indicate problems.

 

Using a Ryzen 3900X with what I think is stock settings (2200MHz at idle, most cores at 4500MHz at full load and one or two at 4600MHz), I have three CPU temperature readings I think are the internal controller, CCX1 and CCX2 (in order):

 

Idle: 40, 32, 32

Full load (some gaming): 72, 70, 68

 

These temperatures are much higher than I'm used to seeing on a desktop, are they normal? Everything seems to be working but I'm kind of worried about seeing 70ºC on something that isn't overclocked.

 

As an experiment I have installed iCue and so far it is working (but I have taken some steps to ensure this), and its sensor indicates a temperature of 28ºC on the coolant after computer startup and 32ºC after a couple of hours playing. Is normal for the coolant temperature difference to be so small between idle and full load?

 

Finally, when setting the pump speed to "extreme" I started to hear sometimes noise int the pump, as if I had a small object circling inside it. While if I put the pump in "quiet" the noise stops. Would this be normal or I really have some kind of object inside the loop?

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There's nothing here that seems out of the ordinary.

For your Ryzen, the thing to look at is the vCore (or, in iCUE, vCPU). Some motherboards overclock out of the box and that will tell the tail. vCore for a Ryzen should top out at 1.4V, IIRC.

And yes, the coolant temps don't rise much. That's the point of liquid cooling - liquid has a much higher heat capacity so it takes more energy to raise the coolant by 1C. While there may be some things that you can do to keep it even lower, I can't tell at this point because we'd need the details of your install. But ... just to note ... one thing that's very common is to see coolers configured as exhaust. This will, in most cases, wind up pushing GPU heat through the cooler, causing the liquid temperature to rise when it shouldn't.

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There's nothing here that seems out of the ordinary.

For your Ryzen, the thing to look at is the vCore (or, in iCUE, vCPU). Some motherboards overclock out of the box and that will tell the tail. vCore for a Ryzen should top out at 1.4V, IIRC.

And yes, the coolant temps don't rise much. That's the point of liquid cooling - liquid has a much higher heat capacity so it takes more energy to raise the coolant by 1C. While there may be some things that you can do to keep it even lower, I can't tell at this point because we'd need the details of your install. But ... just to note ... one thing that's very common is to see coolers configured as exhaust. This will, in most cases, wind up pushing GPU heat through the cooler, causing the liquid temperature to rise when it shouldn't.

 

Hm... Ok, I was wondering this because with the CPU reaching 70ºC I was expecting the coolant temperature would rise to well above 30ºC, I was even worried that the cooler was not working properly (blockage maybe) or not seated correctly on the CPU (poor heat transfer).

 

So, in short 70ºC under load for a Ryzen 3900X is normal, I understand correctly? As for the voltage I believe I got it right, it ranges from 1.3V ~ 1.47V under load to 0.8V ~ 0.9V at idle. (funny enough, when I am in the BIOS the voltage appears to be constant 1.47V and yet the temperature is below 34ºC, I have never seen it before)

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1.47V seems like an overclock. It'll increase the heat.

As for the temps - well, the heat is generated at the pins. It can only transfer to the cooler so quickly. Coolant temp does matter but the specific heat of the coolant is much higher. That means it takes more wattage to increase the temp. Coolant temps typically don't vary more than 5-9C, depending on conditions.

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