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Fan curve for Corsair H115i Pro using iCUE (how high should the RPM go?)


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I've had my custom fan curve set up for some time now, but I want to cool my PC down even more. This is what I normally run. However my PC was still getting fairly hot so I updated it to this last night . Is if safe to run the fans like that? Can they go faster and still be in an ideal range?

 

  • I feel like I can set my fans to higher RPMs but I don't know what's safe. In the picture, it goes up to 4000 RPM, is that safe?

  • According to how the custom graph in the image looks, how would I set up my fan profile? I want them to be at 40% when my CPU is at 40c, then 50% at 50c, 60% at 60c, and then close to 100% for 70c. Would this be a good fan curve?

  • Any reason fans 4 & 5 are at a lower RPM than the other fans? Is it becasuse they're the H115i Pro fans?

  • Side question: I recently replaced my fans on my H115i Pro with LL140s and it shows the fans under the fan section instead of the cooler section. Normal?

 

Thanks!

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1) Your fan maximum speed is going to be limited by the motor specifications. The iCUE speed range does not automatically adjust for every fan. The max speed is on the box and has a +-10% variance. If fans 4 & 5 are on the radiator, they will not run as fast as fan in free air with no resistance. The radiator reduces the fan speed and somewhere in the 1300s is normal for a LL140 on that radiator. Also, LL120 and LL140 fans will have different maximum speeds.

 

2) There probably isn't a good reason to run the radiator fans from the Commander Pro and that is also why they no longer appear in the cooler section. The fan controller on the H115i Pro is the native source and will control the fans with or without the software active. The control source for the fan on the cooler is the coolant temperature. This is how cooling works. Your fans do not cool the underside of your CPU. They help remove heat from the coolant stream by blowing air over a radiator as the heat passes though. Your CPU can be -10 or 100C, but you don't need more fan speed until the coolant begins to heat up. That is a slow process and does not require rapid fan response.

 

CPU heat is transmitted into the coolant stream via the block and through the CPU material itself after the voltage is applied at the pins. There is no control over this and the rate is fixed by the materials and their conductivity. That part is what it is and why your CPU temp when starting a stress test would be exactly the same with a 120mm cooler versus a 10m cooling panel the size of a wall. The difference is the coolant in the small heater will start to warm within 30 seconds. The wall sized one likely never changes. This is how coolant temperature fits in: +1C rise in coolant temp = +1C rise in CPU temp. Coolant temperature is the minimum or baseline CPU temperature. Your haven't listed your specifications, but a normal rise in coolant temperature may be 5-8C, depending on what you are doing. Yes, that's not a lot and why you want a larger cooler. You really shouldn't need anything past 1000 rpm on the H115i Pro, but if you can stand it, you can experiment with those last 200-300 rpm to see how much it reduces the coolant. In my experience, it is rarely worth the 1-2C reduction (at best).

 

3) The default fan control variable on the Commander Pro fan headers is hidden for the Quiet/Balanced/Extreme presets, but it is CPU temperature. However, this is only chosen because it the one thing every CPU must have. There are definitely better choices and you do not need to change your case fan speed when CPU fluctuates, which is about every nanosecond. Depending on the fan's location, GPU temperature or H115i Pro Temp (coolant temperature) are likely better choices for your curve. Rear exhaust is an obvious one for GPU temp. The front/bottom fans are usually your intake and you are aiming to have the intake volume of air match the exhaust (roughly). That means you can use either to help balance the other fans. You will need to make your range accordingly.

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