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Corsair 500D reference build suggestion - question


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I am not sure that's how I would do it, but perhaps only relevant if you were really going to use 1x360, 1x240, 1x120. I am not sure I would do the single 120mm unless I had a really heavy TDP CPU. Given the constraints listed, I would probably do front 360 in, top/rear 240+120 out.
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  • 1 month later...
I saw that on the bottom of my reference build. I am doing 2x280 radiators. I am doing the top as exhaust and the front as intake. Talking with some people about that reference instruction, it is claimed that the negative pressure all exhaust system gets better temperatures. I can only think that would work in extreme build situations, which is why I am setting up one rad as intake and the other as exhaust. That and it looks better in my 500.
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I saw that on the bottom of my reference build. I am doing 2x280 radiators. I am doing the top as exhaust and the front as intake. Talking with some people about that reference instruction, it is claimed that the negative pressure all exhaust system gets better temperatures. I can only think that would work in extreme build situations, which is why I am setting up one rad as intake and the other as exhaust. That and it looks better in my 500.

 

Yeah but you'll end up with dust getting in via all the gaps in the case (that is not filtered). I'm on an overclocked 9900k with SLI'ed 1080TI's and haven't seen a difference between the two airflow scenarios.

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Hi,

 

Recommendation for such fan configuration is based on results of thorough internal testing.

 

When all of the major components are water cooled (CPU + GPUs), full negative pressure setup provides the most efficient cooling performance and lower internal case temperatures. This creates a healthier environment for VRMs, memory, PSU (if it's in the same chamber), hard drives etc.

 

Overall, such configuration creates conditions for a quieter / better performing system.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Hi,

 

Recommendation for such fan configuration is based on results of thorough internal testing.

 

When all of the major components are water cooled (CPU + GPUs), full negative pressure setup provides the most efficient cooling performance and lower internal case temperatures. This creates a healthier environment for VRMs, memory, PSU (if it's in the same chamber), hard drives etc.

 

Overall, such configuration creates conditions for a quieter / better performing system.

buMping this since it's still from this month.

 

 

Would the same still hold true with a blower style 5700 XT card and someone putting together a loop while patiently awaiting the release of that block? 500D SE and not the D though - not that I believe that makes much difference here. Seems logical to me, but could see how it may not work as well too.

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Reference build guide applies to both models, the 500D and 500D RGB SE.

 

Since you plan to have a block on the graphics card I would recommend to utilize recommended fan configuration from build guide. Just to avoid additional work of fliping the fans around once the block for 5700 XT arrives.

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Reference build guide applies to both models, the 500D and 500D RGB SE.

 

Since you plan to have a block on the graphics card I would recommend to utilize recommended fan configuration from build guide. Just to avoid additional work of fliping the fans around once the block for 5700 XT arrives.

 

Ok. Thanks bud!

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I think their reference design makes a lot of sense ... the heat from the two main heat-generating components gets transferred via the cooling liquid to the radiators that are on the outside and the fans blow it out of the case ... the remaining components remain in the relatively cool environment (probably about 30 degrees) that is left behind. I've been surprised by how I've had to actually lower the intake fan RPMs on my 500d to keep case temps lower. One tip: If you have a commander pro, then use the temp sensors around the inside of your case ... it's a real eye-opener.
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