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How to remove thermal pads on Corsair XG7 RGB


Nelly92
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So I did something dumb and tried to peel off top layer on the pre applied thermal pads. I have always thought that something will be on it to prevent dust and such to collect on it. According to the tutorials and youtube videos most people just leave it and go straight to mounting the GPU onto the waterblock. Anyone know how to remove the thermal pads on the XG7 GPU waterblock? It isn't like regular thermal pads and its stuck on as if there is glue underneath it. Can I just scrap it or rub it off?
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Why do you want to take the rest of it off? Are their spares in the box? Either way it it is usually just contact paper and when you put it together and screw everything down, it will be smooshed firmly in place. You'll need to be a pretty precise dropping the block onto the GPU board (or vice versa), but then that is generally a good idea regardless.
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I peeled off like a good amount of the thermal pad on one of the memory modules and was paranoid that it won't get good contact, but regardless I tried to heat it up and it came off easy followed with some IPA to clean off residue. The idea of leaving it and have it smush together was what I thought in the first place but I didn't want to risk anything and ruin my gpu. I'm going to apply the new thermal pad and see how it goes with that
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Here some pictures. I stoped tightening down as soon as i noticed the bending of the PCB and backplate.

 

I had to splice down the thermal pads and cut the pins of the powersupply pins on the graphic card. Maybe you can see it on the attached pictures.

 

Same problem with the CPU block. It was touching the condensators around the CPU und didn't really touch the CPU. So I had to grind down the bracket and a part of the acrylic RGB part to make it fit proberbly. I'm running it on a direct die setup, so this is no big problem for me. Because it's maybe not ment to be used this way.

 

There are even more small issues with my Hydro X parts and iCUE itself, but thats maybe to much for now.

 

I'm a huge Corsair Fan and got nearly everthing in my system you guys offer. But these issues are really disappointing.

 

-Mainboard is an MSI MEG ACE Z390

-GPU is a Gainward Pheonix GS RTX2080TI

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  • Corsair Employees

I'm sorry to hear about the issues.

Can you also take a full front picture of graphics cards PCB and a full front and side picture of GPU water block so we can thoroughly check.

 

For the CPU water block. Running direct die significantly reduces height, the CPU water block and mounting mechanism is not meant to be used like that.

How are the temperatures with direct die setup?

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Sorry I can't offer more pictures becuase the Computer is already put together. I modded everything to fit. Even with thermal pads on rear of the VRMs, because this is quiet important in my opinion.

 

Here are some more pictures of the CPU issue. About the temperatures i'm quiet happy. With GPU under full load I end up with 42°C on the GPU and 50°C on the CPU (While true gaming szenario).

Stress testing the CPU (9900k) ends up with 76-82°C with all cores at 5.2Ghz.

I had a realy lucky CPU before. As it went with 5.0Ghz on your guys AiO with no problem staying under 80°C.

 

But I have to mention, that I run liquid metal on CPU and GPU.

 

The temperatures are not controlled! That means, that I have keep the pump running with full speed. As I don't have the option to control it with iCue.

 

 

We are loosing the topic here. So maybe one of you Corsair guys can contact me, so we can solve all the problems together. I think this would help a lot of people to have fun with their build

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The temperatures are not controlled! That means, that I have keep the pump running with full speed. As I don't have the option to control it with iCue.

 

 

What do you mean the temperatures are not controlled? Erratic? Escalating?

 

Which port did you plug the pump into on the Commander Pro?

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Good job on the modding! Looking sleek and with great temperatures.

 

As for the issue with iCUE.

Can you please open a support ticket.

This way, it'll get immediate attention of our iCUE experts.

 

Thank you :)

 

I did a little bit more research. I hooked the pump up to the mainboards pump header. Via BIOS settings it's possible to control the pumps rpm. But even there it doesn't show any rpm. So I assume that there is something wrong with the pump itself.

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What do you mean the temperatures are not controlled? Erratic? Escalating?

 

Which port did you plug the pump into on the Commander Pro?

 

Sorry I'm not a native english speaker.

Not controlled like, full rpm on fans and pump. So with controlled rpms the whole system temperatures will be slightly higher.

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