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Hot temperatures H115i? - 9900k - 280x


Newbuilder1
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Hey Everyone,

 

I was just curious if my temps were normal or if I should remove the stock thermal paste or do something different.

 

I currently have the 280x with a 280mm AIO radiator up top (exhaust) and the two stock case fans in the front(intake).

 

The AIO fans are set to extreme with the pump set to balance in the Icue software.

 

in the BIOS I have the two fans as well as the AIO fans in smart fan mode.

 

Perhaps should I make an steeper curve?

 

 

I have firefox open, several tabs open, downloading a game on steam, and itunes playing in the background. I feel this is not a huge load.

 

My CPU "package" temps read 60-63 degrees Celsius

 

All cores are around 40-45 degree Celsius however I have one core

 

(core5) hitting 61 degree Celsius. Is this normal? should I re-paste?

 

I don't have any OC and everything is set to auto.

 

my ram is just set to ddr4 3000 preset in the msi bios ram pre set.

 

Are these temps normal? I feel for what is in the background shouldn't warrant such high temps. or am i wrong?

 

my graphics card is just idling at 34 degrees. I am nervous when I play my first game because the GPU isn't even putting out heat yet

 

Thank you.

Edited by Newbuilder1
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You likely would want to do a more controlled test before doing anything like remounting. A bad mount is bad all the time. You don’t need multiple programs to identify it. Unfortunately where things get tricky is recent cpus ramp up the frequency aggressively and Windows power management is a bit mysterious. There is the application side as well. iTunes is often a pig and does things a program should not. If you can tell me why it grabs and holds focus for multiple clicks after launch, please let me know. I have seen 25% CPU usage on 8700K playing music with no other active voluntary programs.

 

Fan speed won’t help with this, contact problem or just aggressive core allocation. Your coolant temperature is the fan and pump variable. That won’t show much change for what your describing. You should expect a +6-8C rise in 10-15 min on a stress test.

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You likely would want to do a more controlled test before doing anything like remounting. A bad mount is bad all the time. You don’t need multiple programs to identify it. Unfortunately where things get tricky is recent cpus ramp up the frequency aggressively and Windows power management is a bit mysterious. There is the application side as well. iTunes is often a pig and does things a program should not. If you can tell me why it grabs and holds focus for multiple clicks after launch, please let me know. I have seen 25% CPU usage on 8700K playing music with no other active voluntary programs.

 

Fan speed won’t help with this, contact problem or just aggressive core allocation. Your coolant temperature is the fan and pump variable. That won’t show much change for what your describing. You should expect a +6-8C rise in 10-15 min on a stress test.

 

 

Interesting okay.

 

Playing PUBG on max settings my GPU is at 65 degrees Celsius and my cpu is at 60-63 package with the other cores around 55-60.

 

the glass side panel is pretty warm if not slightly hot

 

Is that normal?

 

Thank You for your help!

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You would need to do a CPU only test.

And ... more importantly, you've not included the single most important factor to help us determine the issue - what is the vCore (vCPU in iCUE)??

 

at idle with just firefox and icue open i am at 1.08-1.14V

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Usually, on-line shops such as overclockers, always give a warning that a 360 AIO is needed when fitting a i9.

 

I have the i9 myself and it took a bit of fiddling even with a H150i AIO to get my temps to a reasonable level. I actually regret buying the i9 because of the ridiculous temperature they get up to.

Edited by FlashCW
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Hmm well what do I do? Add some exhaust fans on the back of the case and two on the bottom for Intake? It idles around 32-35 which is fine and I thought 60 degrees gaming with maxed out settings was pretty good right?

 

I just didn’t like it was high with a low load but it’s just iTunes being a poorly written program.

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I don’t see an issue with the cooling. You may need some more time with your 9900K to learn it’s behavior. As Intel stretches out this 14nm platform as far as they can, clock speeds and response time are quick and often seemingly frantic. The old days of your 2600 sitting at 700MHz like a placid lake are done. These current ones never sit still and respond full throttle to everything. The idea of a “no load” or low load level doesn’t really exist any more, at least without turning on every power saving mode you have — with clear consequences. Give it some time. Note the Vcore level. It’s going to be at the highest setting a lot.
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Your temp seems a touch high for no OC set, but since I don't have that particular case I would chalk it up to airflow most likely. And the vCore you report is the same I was seeing thereabout when I was letting the CPU run stock settings. Don't recall temps but they weren't that high.

 

I9-9900K running 5/all at 1.23 vCore, I've taken it to 5.3 with 1.26 vCore but at that point need to start looking at a CL. That said my temps at idle are 45-46c on the package, ignore the core temps in this instance since you want to cool the CPU not a single core. The package temp gives you the right reading. Under a load I see temps around 60c max. The H115i does a fine job keeping it under control.

 

Play with the fans or add another one for exhaust. The other thing you should consider doing is filling out the system specs under your name. Helps to know MB and stuff like that as well. Cheers.

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Thank you for all of your responses. The fans are set at extreme using icue for the AIO and the pump is set to balance ( should I set it to extreme? ) I don’t want the pump to die sooner than it’s life expectancy. Also I have the AIO plugged into the CPU fan on the motherboard.

 

I will set a steeper curve for the system fans though.

 

However I think it’s warmer because the AIO is set to exhaust so that warm internal air is blowing into the radiator. I feel like I’ve been told this answer but why can’t I just run it in reverse? The AIO sits on top of the case intaking and the two front fans exhaust? I feel like that would help

Edited by Newbuilder1
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Thank you for all of your responses. The fans are set at extreme using icue for the AIO and the pump is set to balance ( should I set it to extreme? ) I don’t want the pump to die sooner than it’s life expectancy. Also I have the AIO plugged into the CPU fan on the motherboard.
Set your pump to Extreme. It helps my 9900K's temperatures a bit. And no, it won't die prematurely, they are designed to run at Extreme speed. The 9900K still is a very hot CPU, though.

Plugging in the CPU fan header to the motherboard is always a good idea. If you have a newer, SATA powered cooler like the H115i RGB Platinum or Pro, it will only be used to tell the mainboard that the pump is still working (by reporting RPM), though, which can be handy if your mainboard has a CPU fan warning. Older coolers that were powered by the fan header need to be plugged in for them to even work.

 

However I think it’s warmer because the AIO is set to exhaust so that warm internal air is blowing into the radiator. I feel like I’ve been told this answer but why can’t I just run it in reverse? The AIO sits on top of the case intaking and the two front fans exhaust? I feel like that would help
Hot air rises. That's why you usually want the exhaust to be on top (or at the very least higher than the intake). It also depends on the design of the case, though. You can try it out, but check what it does with your airflow and the temperature of the rest of your components.

 

What I'd suggest to do if your case allows it is mount the radiator in the front intake. If you have no additional intake fans (or even if you do), I'd recommend a pull configuration pulling in cool air or - more ideally - a push/pull configuration (those two options should keep airflow inside the case better than push through the radiator). Use the Exhaust location for regular fans.

 

For me, buying the i9 was a mistake. I feel like I have gone back to my old red hot AMD days. My biggest reason for swapping over to intel was because they ran ice cold compared to AMD.
Even early reviews indicated this thing was running hot, thus it wasn't really a surprise to me (and it's predecessors ran kinda hot as well, although not to that level, but they also had less cores at lower clockspeeds). That may have been the case with older AMD CPU Generations compared to older Intel CPU generations. AMD CPUs with the ZEN architecture actually run much cooler (depends on cores, clockspeed, voltage, etc.. of course). Things should improve even more with the Ryzen 3000 series. Intel is pushing the limits of their aged manufacturing process/node nowadays since they can't compete with AMD in that regard and the 9900K is a hot mess due to it. Edited by Glzmo
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Due to the dimensions on the 280X I doubt a push/pull config on the front is doable if they have a big GPU. 680X and if I mounted the radiator and fans on the front it would be nearly touching the leading edge of the 2080Ti.

 

Interestingly I was seeing idle temps on a stock R7 2700 almost 50% higher than the I9. Though that could have been because the cooler was having a fit. . .among other things.

 

While I normally don't advocate for people who aren't sure what they are doing, this might be one of those times to look at playing with the VCore and seeing how low you can take it while still remaining stable. If I set the I9 to 5G/all and leave it at that it will hit 90c and keep going. Though I could have just gotten a good piece of silicone as this one is happy to run 5G all day long at 1.23. But that is probably going to net him the best reduction.

796262215_ICueVcore.thumb.jpg.04ca43973f325f4a7a22c3bc15f24f7c.jpg

AISuiteVcore.thumb.jpg.95978e17e0bbb0b157e78a82bb7d855c.jpg

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Hot air rises. That's why you usually want the exhaust to be on top (or at the very least higher than the intake). It also depends on the design of the case, though. You can try it out, but check what it does with your airflow and the temperature of the rest of your components.

 

Let's qualify this a bit because this piece of misunderstanding is all over the place. First, "hot air" doesn't rise. Heavier air sinks. All other things being equal (e.g. humidity, etc), cooler air will be heavier. It is, however, very possible that warmer, more humid air will sink under a cooler, drier, layer of air. This does happen. A lot, in fact.

 

Now, that's also (and most importantly) without circulation. So unless you are running your case without any fans at all - like we did back in the early 90's when the only fans were in the PSU - then it's a completely pointless statement. Put so much as a single case fan in there and that statement is completely pointless. It is absolutely valid in some builds to have intake on the top.

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Let's put this into some form of real world context...

 

Here is what my PC is currently monitoring with AIDA64 at idle, whilst I am typing this post...

 

Mobo: Aorus Master F9b

Case: Fractal Define R6

CPU: i9-9900K

OC: 5.1GHz / 4.3GHz all cores (no voltage mods)

RAM: PC3200 OC: PC3400

GPU: Radeon R9 270X

Ambient temp measured at intake: 20C

Case temp measured at rear exhaust: 26C (32C)

CPU package temp: 26C (81C)

GPU temp: 29C (67C)

VRM temp: 33C (54C)

PCH temp: 33C (38C)

Intake fans: front x 4 (through rad) and base x 2

Exhaust fans: top x 2 and rear

H115i Pro location: case front, push/pull

H115i Pro pump profile: Balanced

H115i Pro coolant temp: 24C (32C)

HX850i PSU temp: 21C (23C)

NVMe max drive temp: 33C (45C)

Highest fan speed: 700RPM (PSU & base intake) (1800RPM front)

No of fans: 11 !

Noise level: low (barely audible) (Moderate)

 

This is idle at 20C ambient, so you can scale the figures up if your room temp is higher. I have a lot of fans in my case, but they all run at low speed unless the system is under extreme stress. This gives good airflow through the case, keeping all of the non-CPU components cool.

 

Figures in red are during an AIDA64 stress test with all components selected. Even under these extreme condiditions, the H115i Pro is more than capable of keeping the i9-9900K temps in check with no CPU thermal throttling.

 

Fact, this is an example of what can be achieved with the i9-9900K / H115i Pro combo, without too much effort, using a well designed case. In fact, the most effort was spent setting up all of the fan profiles ;):

Edited by Yemble
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When it comes to air flow you would want it take the path of least resistance. Threw up a pic of the setup with arrows showing the path of stuff. I could have done a better job but this will get the point across. A couple things have been changed from when I took this but the path hasn't. Should give you an idea of one possible airflow setup.

 

The three 120's on the front and the two 140's on the bottom are the intakes, which only come on once the temp on the RAM hits 60c for the fronts, and the bottom start if the GPU RAM goes past 65c. CPU cooler is always running at ~800rpm on the two and the rear kicks on at 50 on the GPU. I point to my temps in a previous post as an example of what you can do if you take care to dial things in.

 

When it comes to the cooler for the CPU I could probably get a couple degrees cooler if I had it as an intake and not an exhaust but I'm reasonably certain it would only be an improvement of 2-3c. And I've taped off the unused PCI ports in the back under the card. That was to keep the system from pulling air through them, and also to keep the airflow where I want it going. It isn't anything you need to worry about just a thing I have done for a while.

 

One piece of advice I should give you though with that 2080Ti. She is a thirsty beast and should have individual cables instead of the daisy chain one you see in that picture. Figured almost 400w through the one was a little sketchy.

 

The system RAM is actually the hottest part of the system at idle sitting at 50-51c give or take.

 

Also what motherboard are you using?

680XAirflow.thumb.jpg.abfa91186ad9595085af163940067fac.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...
Due to the dimensions on the 280X I doubt a push/pull config on the front is doable if they have a big GPU. 680X and if I mounted the radiator and fans on the front it would be nearly touching the leading edge of the 2080Ti.

 

Interestingly I was seeing idle temps on a stock R7 2700 almost 50% higher than the I9. Though that could have been because the cooler was having a fit. . .among other things.

 

While I normally don't advocate for people who aren't sure what they are doing, this might be one of those times to look at playing with the VCore and seeing how low you can take it while still remaining stable. If I set the I9 to 5G/all and leave it at that it will hit 90c and keep going. Though I could have just gotten a good piece of silicone as this one is happy to run 5G all day long at 1.23. But that is probably going to net him the best reduction.

I've got the 680x and the RTX 2080--noticed the tight squeeze in the front panel also...did you end up front-mounting your radiator or take a different approach? Curious to hear how you went about it as I'm trying to make this decision in my own build.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

EDIT: Read a little further and saw the picture of your build--thanks a million!

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I've got the 680x and the RTX 2080--noticed the tight squeeze in the front panel also...did you end up front-mounting your radiator or take a different approach? Curious to hear how you went about it as I'm trying to make this decision in my own build.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

EDIT: Read a little further and saw the picture of your build--thanks a million!

 

NP and hope it helped. As for how I went about it, I did not. Corsair did. Per my instructions. Would have liked to since the build is part of the fun but due to certain circumstances it was better to have them do it.

 

And another piece of the puzzle I have been leaving breadcrumbs for is laid bare.

 

And for the record letting things more or less idle on the machine here's what I am seeing (red under 100% load):

 

I9-9900K 5/all VCore 1.24: 47-50°C (83-85°C Loaded)

Dominator Platinum DDR-3600 (Running at 3466 due to the IMC freaking out with 64Gb of RAM at rated speed. Also temp is the hottest stick the rest are cooler but to be expected): 44°C (50-52°C)

HX1200i: 33°C (this just doesn't heat up past there even when its supplying almost 700w)

EVGA 2080Ti FTW3 Ultra Hybrid OCd to 2175 GPU and 17600 RAM: 37°C (59°C rock solid stable even with those settings and could go higher still but would need a custom BIOS on the card and possibly some soldering because as Scotty would say "She's givin' it all she's got Cap'n")

Samsung 970 Pro 1Tb: 40°C (50-55°C)

H115i Platinum: 31°C (34°C)

Internal Chassis Temps: 27-35°C (That's because I am lazy and haven't put the AC in yet in the office, really should look at plumbing this room for the central)

Ambient Temp: 33°C

Edited by Waukeen
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