Jump to content
Corsair Community

[Help] iCue Fan Curve H115 and case fan


tommy2911
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I'm trying to set up a custom fan curve with iCue for the new PC.

I connected to the Corsair Commander Pro there's the H115i and 4 fans (3 frontal, 1 exaust).

Rest of the buid: https://it.pcpartpicker.com/list/zCDg6s

 

Right now I set all the fans to follow the CPU package temperature with a custom curve and the pump to a balanced profile.

However, it's a bit noisy since there's instant spikes in package temperature forcing fans to constantly increase and reduce speeds and the temperature of the case is quite low.

The temperature provided from the H115i is the temperature of the coolant? Should I set the AIO fan speed considering it? Any good curve to share?

For the case fans with temp should I use as reference?

 

Thanks for the help

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The AIO should absolutely use the coolant temperature. See the Liquid Cooling FAQ for tips on creating the fan curve.

 

For case fans, I like to use the sensors that come with the CoPro to measure internal case temps and adjust fan speeds accordingly. You'll want to use a similar methodology to that described in the Liquid Cooling FAQ for that as well, but referencing the case temperature. Pay particular attention to the impact that your GPU has on internal case temperatures - it can be quite substantial with a high-end GPU. My primary sensor for this is about 4" above my GPU.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The AIO should absolutely use the coolant temperature. See the Liquid Cooling FAQ for tips on creating the fan curve.

 

For case fans, I like to use the sensors that come with the CoPro to measure internal case temps and adjust fan speeds accordingly. You'll want to use a similar methodology to that described in the Liquid Cooling FAQ for that as well, but referencing the case temperature. Pay particular attention to the impact that your GPU has on internal case temperatures - it can be quite substantial with a high-end GPU. My primary sensor for this is about 4" above my GPU.

 

Just to have an idea; after 1h on idle the coolant temperature is fixed at 28.3°C with the standard balanced profile (roomT is 21°C). It's too high for idle? (9700k-5GHz)

I put the CoPro sensor: close to VRM, between gpu and ram, below the GPU and close to the HDD.

I set the GPU fans to work starting from 25°C at low rpm, this way I can keep the T below it a decent value otherwise they grow up to 45°C.

Maybe I can use the T of one of the first two sensor I placed or it'0s better to use the socket T provided by the mobo?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The coolant temperature sounds fine.

As for the case fan control temp - the socket temperature is largely irrelevant for managing case temperatures. That heat is handled by the cooler; it's not being dumped into the case. The sensor close to the VRM is probably the best for controlling the case fans - you want to be focused on that internal case temperature.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks for the help!

Just a last thing; do you have a curve for the H115i to share?

Or a general idea for some points of the curve.

 

This is always going to be system and environmentally dependent. Your baseline coolant temperature is usually ambient room temp +4-7C, depending on the case size, layout, etc. Or another way to look at is the coolant temp cannot be lower than the internal air temp surrounding it in the case. As tedious as that sounds, power on the PC and pull up this site while listening to some music. Whatever it says 10 minutes later is your baseline. Set the fans to a quiet level around that temperature. For most people, that means something like 500-600 rpm on 140s.

 

Next figure out the maximum coolant temperature you see. You could run a stress test for 10-15 minutes and find out, although if you do a lot of mixed CPU+GPU loads (gaming/renders), the better assessment is doing that. Take note of the peak value across all your games/programs. Set the fans to the highest level your are comfortable with and before the sound becomes irritating. For most people, this is going to be in the 900-1100 rpm range.

 

In between those two points, you can straight line it, although I will suggest your leave yourself about 2-3C of flat line at the bottom after the baseline temp. A room temp change of +1C will means a +1C rise in coolant. You don't want/need a fan response as the room or case temp changes by 1 degree, especially at idle.

 

The very last dot you can put a bit out of range and at max speed. If things get out of the normal range, you will probably hear it before you see it, especially if using 2000 rpm fans.

 

Now the somewhat fiddly part in all of this is room temp baseline + small temp range for the device means you are going to need seasonal curves, unless you are in a perfectly climate controlled space. In Winter, you might be running between 18-28C, while in Summer 27-37C. The room temp swings can be as large as the device temp change. I save three "ranges" in my fan profiles and select the one I need.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...