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Thermistor Placement


kevdog
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Ive read some other posts regarding this topic. I have a LianLi PC-O11Dw case with no front intakes. I have 3 side and 3 bottom intakes and a H150i Pro cooler at the top running the 3 stock fans with the unit. Unfortunately there is no rear fan -- only a grill. In terms of thermistor placement I was thinking of putting the thermistors in the following configuration

 

1. Outflow side of H-150i Pro radiator

2. Outflow side of bottom intake case fans

3. Outflow side of side intake case fans

4. ??? Not sure where to put fourth thermistor

 

Any other recommendations?

 

What is best way to attach thermistors to the surface? Small piece of electrical tape?

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1. Outflow side of H-150i Pro radiator - good. Equivalent to coolant temp but will always work even without iCUE. This is likely your control sensor for the intake fans.

 

2. Outflow side of bottom intake case fans - for informational purposes. Top/bottom case temp differences.

 

3. Outflow side of side intake case fans - informational again. Not sure how much value it will have. Could also use it in the back chamber near drives/psu.

 

4. ??? - I would put in on the back side of the empty 80mm grate in the rear of the case to measure exhaust air temp. With 6x120 in and 3x120 radiator restricted fans out, a lot of air will be passively pushed out this opening. It will give you a contrast point between top of case air temp (exhaust) and the 360mm radiator exhaust temp of air + CPU heat. Effectively a measure of cpu heat added in degrees. Also could be used as intake fan control source.

 

 

Yes, just tape them.

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Thanks for suggestions

 

Regarding #3

 

I have nvME drive and an SSD. The SSD is a backup drive so I'm not necessarily worried about the heat here. The NVMe is covered by a typical metal heat spreader. I'm not sure if there would be any value taping it to the heat spreader however maybe I'm totally wrong about this. Access to this drive is kind of difficult because of the video card that sits over it so I'm not sure if the measurement in this area is going to measure NVMe heat or combination of Graphics Card and NVMe.

 

Thanks for suggestion on #4

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The NVME m.2 drive will have its own temp reading in iCUE, although you will manually need to add it. It's temperature reading is most definitely internal and there is little point and possible some risk in taping the sensor end to it. To be safe, you want to avoid sensor to metal contact on things like your VRM heak sink, PCH, etc. The chances of creating an electrical circuit are low, but then all of these have their own internal sensors anyway.

 

If you can't come up with a 4th logical place, just go with three. It's one less wire to manage. However, as someone who also runs a two compartment case, I occasionally get interested to know what's going on back there. You can park one sensor on the other half to see what happens under load. Your PSU is likely semi-passive and will radiate heat when the fan is not engaged. That may affect general drive temps and help you sort an environmental change versus a hardware or usage based temp increase. Another option is one I used until just recently. I taped one sensor to the exhaust on my Seasonic Prime. It is also passive, so the temp sensor would read room temp when the fan was not running and the exhaust temp when it was. This was a backdoor way of creating 30 min to 1 hr graphs in iCUE to measure how often my PSU fan was running. A year on I realized this PSU is reliable, the temps don't vary, and the performance is solid, so this place went to one of my water sensors instead.

Edited by c-attack
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