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CMK32GX4M2K4133C19 unstable!


MyPC8MyBrain
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this is my second kit in a row after support told me first kit was defective and i should RMA it,

 

as a side rant Corsair in this day and age expecting a customer to RMA memory kit worth almost $700 has many implication you conveniently neglect to address with this RMA method; this means someone will be out of a system for the duration in this day and age it is simply unacceptable as most system accommodating a $700 pair of ram sticks are not your run of the mill systems you can expect downtime to be ok with,

 

back to the issue at hand which im at my whits end at this point after wasting so much time and money just to be in the same predicament all over again with more money spent and more time wasted; all on my expense :mad:

 

i have im my possession two kits atm; one from Corsair to replace the first faulty Corsair CMK32GX4M2K4133C19 kit provided, which is still failing to work at their advertised speeds on ASUS z390i with i9 9900k,

 

at this point i am giving up on Corsair DDR4 RAM!

yes i said it when i contact support and have to wait days just to hear some generic call center personnel respond with textbook response "its defective, send it in we will RMA it" like i have time for these games,

 

i tried my best to give it another shoot as the first Corsair kit didn't even boot with its XMPII profile; the second kit does boot into windows but keeps getting errors,

 

if Corsair wants to win my trust again here is your chance,

i will not chase you just to hand you $700 for a none working computer parts,

you will... if you want me as a customer thats is,

or even a more basic requirement from just about any customer...

win my trust again at this point!

 

worst case ill just buy a low cost generic pair and have a stable system i can trust to work for us on a daily basis,

i just dont have time or patience for this nonsense deceitful false advertising!

 

 

TIA

Chris

Edited by MyPC8MyBrain
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  • 1 month later...
  • Corsair Employees

Hello Chris,

 

Sorry for the late reply. I'm sorry I missed your post. When it comes to high speed kits (anything above 3600mhz on Z270 and above) there is a lot more at play than just enabling XMP because the memory controller is built into the CPU. With high speed kits, depending on the IMC (integrated memory controller) quality, voltages may need to be increased on the CPU to maintain stability at the rated frequency.

 

If two separate kits are having the same issue, this is likely the cause. For a turn key solution, a kit rated at 3600mhz or below should have no issue on your board. However, it is definitely possible that you could still get the rated frequency.

 

Our memory specialist has taken over your ticket. If you would like to communicate with him directly, please reach out. I believe will be responding to your ticket letting you know this. Either way, I am here to help in any way I can!

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  • 1 month later...

I have the similar problem. Motherboard Asus WS Z390 Pro, CPU Intel Core i9-9900K. DDR4 CMK32GX4M2K4133C19 is advertised to work at 4133Mhzh. But I managed to run ONLY at 3333Mhz relatively stable (didn't test much, as don't have OS yet). The Maximum what I could reach is 3600Mhz - very unstable (boot time to time) and only with ONE DIMM !

 

Any idea what can I tweak?

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You both are on 9900K and Z390 boards. You may want to google around a bit looking for 4000+ MHz speeds and your hardware. There a lot of people struggling with that combination, professionals included. I won't make any declarations about the root cause of the issue since I don't have the Z390, but if everyone is using different brand RAM kits and different motherboards, then the you need to look at something else. Most of them will express their opinion clearly in their posts.

 

@Opechunka -> Presumably you are using the board to calculate secondary and tertiary timings for you. That's fine, but don't crank down on them with any of the Asus Tweak settings. I am not sure if the WS board even has that, but I just finished a long discussion with someone else on this issue. Are you locking up during memory training (pre-BIOS splash screen)? Does it return to the BIOS window or you have to force a reset?

 

Primary timings, leave Commander Rate at T2 (CR2) for now, DRAM voltage, VCCIO and VCCSA voltage. Asus tend to clock IO and SA too high on default, but I would not expect this to be problematic on the training level.

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According to the following website i9 9900k "This chip supports up to 64 GiB of dual-channel DDR4-2666 memory".

With this spec keep in mind you are attempting to run an overclock. There are a lot of factors that will come into play and you may run into limitations depending the cpu-motherboard-ram combination.

https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/intel/core_i9/i9-9900k

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Are you locking up during memory training (pre-BIOS splash screen)? Does it return to the BIOS window or you have to force a reset?

 

The motherboard has a function MemOK. It actually boots a few cycles trying to adjust some parameters until the memory works. If not, then it just boots to recovery mode by applying SPD profike (2133Mhz). If MemOK if off (controllable by switch on the board), then it just hangs and I have to reset the bios settings or turn on MemOK.

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So you need to hit the MemOK switch to return to the BIOS? It does not cycle around back the "boot error" American Megatrends BIOS "F1" screen on its own? All the shuffling pre-BIOS screen is the memory training. It is trying to find working values for the subtimings. It's not making it. If it feels like this happens no matter what speed you pick from 2400-4000, then I would suggest going down to the end of the Advanced BIOS and hitting "load optimal defaults". I had a weird experience earlier today with using XMP on my Z370. I rarely ever use it and always go higher or tighter than the XMP settings. My new Domiantor RGB kit cleanly booted at XMP 3600 every time, but if I tried to manually run slower and tighter or faster and looser, I was failing training on settings that should have worked. After resetting the BIOS and NOT activating XMP, all of the prior settings worked and I am up to 4000 17-18-39-T2 at 1.375v. If you reset the BIOS, you will need to redo ALL of your settings, including fan training, boot order, etc., just like when you flash a new version. I suspect the Asus Z390 behavior is quite similar to the Z370. Something was getting flipped at XMP I did not want, but could never find it to undo it -- and I know my BIOS well.

 

Try these settings after the BIOS wipe. Manual OC tuning at the top. BCLK 100.

 

3466 frequency -> Adv RAM timings -> 16-18-36-T2 (Com Rate 2 or AUTO). DRAM voltage 1.35. Leave all secondary and tertiary timings on auto.

 

If that works, you can try 17-19-39-T2 and 1.375v for 3733. This is a 2x16GB kit, right? Beyond this is were things typically get difficult and not everyone has the stomach for hand tuning every timing. Not sure I do either.

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An Update...

As I've mentioned before, I managed to make it work only at 3333 Mhz. I talked to Corsair support, and they tried to convince me, that it's not a memory problem, but my motherboard (Asus WS Z390 Pro) and CPU (i9-9900k).

Amazon replaced the memory sticks with another one. So now it's running at 3600 Mhz. So still not good memory, than CPU and motherboard, right? But anyway, I've paid for 4133 Mhz but not for 3600. So I'm going to send it back to Amazon. Then buy G.Skill 64G (instead of 32G) 3733 Mhz as cannot get 4133 anyway.

Edited by opechunka
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Well, you can do as you like but I think you are missing the point. The fact the motherboard manufacturer lists the maximum memory frequency the BIOS will support, does not mean you can run it, anymore than having a preset for 4266 MHz or 5.5GHz on your CPU means you can do that. It's still overclocking and there are no guarantees. If you don't like how the industry markets their product specifications, well a lot of people may agree with you, but that does not change the obstacles you're facing or the reality of possible settings.

 

I am not sure of your prime purpose for this machine. It's a WS board, so presumably it is along those lines. If you actually can use 64GB of RAM, then go for it. However, doubling down on the density will not make the overclocking any easier and likely the opposite. This also brings things back around to your primary purpose. Most people who run memory sucking professional apps don't push their memory frequency to the limit for a good reason. You may need to make an assessment of your expectations versus what you can actually use.

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I am not sure of your prime purpose for this machine.

 

Well I'm a professional C++ developer. My office machine conf is two Intel Xeon of 20 core each, RAM 64 Gb. Full C++ solution build takes more than an hour. Well, maybe I'm not going to make a build on my home PC. But probably it'll give you some insights why it makes sense to me to build a top performance PC.

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Well I'm a professional C++ developer. My office machine conf is two Intel Xeon of 20 core each, RAM 64 Gb. Full C++ solution build takes more than an hour. Well, maybe I'm not going to make a build on my home PC. But probably it'll give you some insights why it makes sense to me to build a top performance PC.

 

Yeah, I get it. Now ... here's the thing to think about ... when you do a build in C++, is your build time bound by memory speed?

It's not.

Your biggest constraint, especially with large projects, is the disk speed. You'll get more build improvement (and a lot less headache) with striped NVMe SSDs.

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Yeah, I get it. Now ... here's the thing to think about ... when you do a build in C++, is your build time bound by memory speed?

It's not.

Your biggest constraint, especially with large projects, is the disk speed. You'll get more build improvement (and a lot less headache) with striped NVMe SSDs.

 

You are right about SSD. As I said my target is not just C++ compilation, as it's still home PC. But still I feel more comfortable when my home PC is able (or very close to) do what my office PC does. Definitely price has to be reasonable and "reasonable" is my subjective perception :) What I'm going to target currently in this thread, it's just RAM, not other components. The idea is why to pay 600-700 Euro per 32Gbyte 4133Mhz RAM, if the maximum what I could gain on my PC is just 3600Mhz. So I want to try 64 Gbytes 3733Mhz for 800 Euro hoping that it still runs at 3600Mhz at least. Am I naive? :)

Edited by opechunka
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No... that’s what we were trying to get at. A 64GB kit XMP preset 3600 MHz and the expectation to run it at 3600 or thereabouts makes perfect sense. Doubling density on the module and hoping to overclock it to 4000 does not. Even at 32GB, I don’t see a lot of advantage on that specific platform to pushing the maximum memory frequency as high as you can. Stable and not ever losing a run is probably far more important.
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